Afro Pop dancing with a master

Philip Amo Agyapong brought the theory and practice of African traditional dance forms to Stanford students.

For a dance student, the master class is a rare and treasured opportunity. It is a chance to not only observe an expert demonstrating a particular art, but also to physically engage with the expert. Over 20 Stanford students had that opportunity in Roble Gym with Afro Pop dance master Philip Amo Agyapong. Originally from…

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British novelist Zadie Smith to speak at Stanford

This year’s Stanford Presidential Lecture in the Humanities and Arts will feature acclaimed British author Zadie Smith on March 7.

Zadie Smith, a prize-winning British novelist, essayist and short-story writer, will speak at Stanford to deliver the 2019 Stanford Presidential Lecture in the Humanities and Arts on Thursday, March 7. As part of the event, Smith will read from one of her works and then converse with Harry Elam Jr., vice president for the arts…

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Stanford University announces Stanford Live partnerships with Goldenvoice and the San Francisco Symphony

The partnerships at Frost Amphitheater will include rock, pop and classical concerts as well as spoken-word performances in the inaugural season of this newly renovated venue in the university’s arts district.

When Frost Amphitheater reopens in the spring, the Stanford and South Bay community will again be able to enjoy live music on the terraced lawn. And thanks to Stanford Live’s two new musical partnerships, the performance offerings are richer than ever. Frost Amphitheater will reopen this spring after an extensive renovation project that includes the…

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“Sequence” returns

After being indoors at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art for the last three years, Richard Serra’s sculpture Sequence has returned to the Cantor Arts Center to stand again in the open air.

Sometimes a work of art leaves both metaphorical and physical marks, causing us to consider the physical space it occupied, as well as its impact, long after it’s gone. Such is the case with Richard Serra’s massive steel sculpture Sequence, one of the distinguished artist’s greatest achievements. Video by Kurt Hickman Timelapse video shows reinstallation of…

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Stanford’s Frost Amphitheater renovation on pace

The university is upgrading the 82-year-old facility while preserving its iconic past.

In the summer of 2017, renovation construction began on Frost Amphitheater, a venue that holds a special place in the hearts of all those who were lucky enough to attend an event there since its opening in 1937. The goal of the project is to build a state-of-the-art stage and introduce other back-of-house amenities, as…

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Gilded frames enhance paintings from the Gilded Age at the Cantor Arts Center

Museum framer creates gilded frames using squirrel hairs, agate stones and recipes found in a 15th-century manual.

During the holiday season, the whole world seems more luminous and shinier, from sparkling lights to beautifully wrapped gifts. Sparkle and shine are also on view at Stanford’s Cantor Arts Center this season, particularly in the exhibition Painting Nature in the American Gilded Age. That’s because the word “gilded” in the title of the exhibition…

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Exhibition “Hand and Eye” celebrates East Asian ceramic traditions

The exhibition "Hand and Eye: Contemporary Reflections of East Asian Ceramic Traditions," on view through Dec. 14 in the East Asia Library, features historic and contemporary works by Japanese, American and Stanford artists.

A new campus ceramics exhibition that displays many works produced in wood-burning kilns – including sculptures, jars and tea sets – shows that the ceramic traditions of East Asia are alive and evolving in contemporary Japan and United States – and at Stanford. A mere 1 percent (by weight) of iron oxide in an otherwise…

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Cantor Arts Center and Stanford Libraries collaborate to make Warhol photography archives publicly available

Searchable databases allow researchers and Andy Warhol fans worldwide to examine over 130,000 photographs taken by the iconic artist.

For those who ever wondered about the exact design of John Lennon’s iconic glasses or what it would have been like to have had a front-row seat at Maria Shriver’s wedding to Arnold Schwarzenegger, the newly accessible archive of Andy Warhol’s photography provides a rare opportunity to get up close and personal with the social…

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Stegner Fellow Jamel Brinkley’s novel named a Finalist for the National Book Award

Jamel Brinkley is a graduate of Columbia University and the Iowa Writers’ Workshop. He has received fellowships from Kimbilio Fiction, the Wisconsin Institute for Creative Writing, and Stanford University where he is currently a Stegner Fellow. A Lucky Man is his first book. He lives in California.

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Stanford unveils new Presidential Residencies on the Future of the Arts and welcomes international guest artists

Guest artists from around the world bring vitality and variety to campus in the fall.

Artists from across the globe come to Stanford to perform, create and engage. The 80-plus guest artists visiting campus this fall are hosted by over 20 Stanford departments, centers and programs. Some of the artists will be at Stanford for a single public event and others will stay for an extended visit for deep engagement…

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Unparalleled collection of Warhol’s photography at Stanford University includes images never exhibited before

In an interactive element of the photo exhibit at the Cantor Arts Center, visitors can zoom in on the artist’s contact sheets and create their own Warhol-inspired digital prints on screen.

Photographs by Andy Warhol that have never publicly been displayed are the heart of the new exhibition, Contact Warhol: Photography Without End, on view Sept. 29, 2018, through Jan. 6, 2019, at the Cantor Arts Center at Stanford University. The show traces Warhol’s artistic process from the most fundamental level of a photo negative to its transformation…

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Sculpture installed at Stanford University’s Denning House anchors new art collection

The 17-foot bronze sculpture is by Ursula von Rydingsvard, who will visit campus next month for a formal dedication of the artwork and to speak with students.

When the inaugural cohort of Knight-Hennessy Scholars arrive to Stanford, they will be greeted by a new sculpture in front of Denning House, their program’s new home. The sculpture, MOCNA, by Ursula von Rydingsvard, was commissioned as the first piece in Denning House’s art collection, which plans to acquire one piece every year from emerging and established…

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New on the Shelf: Rare Books & Artists’ Books

A new exhibition in Stanford’s Green Library offers a window into recent acquisitions in Special Collections. Books—both manuscript and print—are the focus of the display on the second floor of the Bing Wing, on view September 4, 2018 through January 6, 2019. Cases in the Peterson Gallery, adjacent to the Special Collections Reading Room, feature…

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Learning en plein air

At Stanford University, gardens beckon visitors to learn en plein air – about small-scale sustainable farming, about sun-loving desert plants, and about sculpture, ranging from works carved in wood and stone by village artists from Papua New Guinea to bronzes created by the renowned French sculptor Auguste Rodin. The gardens are open to the people…

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Stanford museums are always free and are perfect places to visit on a summer day

Summer is the perfect time to explore exhibitions at the Anderson Collection and the Cantor Arts Center that highlight art in various mediums from around the country and the world. Two special exhibitions are in their final weeks, so plan to visit soon. Closing soon: Irene Chou 周綠雲 (China, 1924–2011), Untitled, 1995. Ink and color…

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Stanford Repertory Theater brings legendary women of ancient Greece to the stage

In "Hecuba/Helen," Stanford Repertory Theater brings together two iconic heroines for the first time. The play opens Thursday, July 26, in Roble Studio Theater. Performances will be held at 8 p.m. Thursday through Saturday, and at 2 p.m. on Sunday, through Aug. 19.

In a new adaptation of two plays by Euripides, the Stanford Repertory Theater presents the stories of women on opposite sides of the Trojan War – Hecuba of Troy, a fallen queen facing a life of slavery, and Helen of Sparta, a renowned beauty plotting a reunion with her long-lost husband. Video by Kurt Hickman Stanford Repertory…

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