ArtsWest symposium calls for greater representation of women in the arts

Women artists are dramatically underrepresented at many levels of the art world from art showings to museum management, a Lane Center survey has found. A keynote address by Arnold J. Kemp MFA ’05 and an influential panel of arts insiders shined a light on the survey’s sobering results. The ArtsWest symposium “Women Who Transformed Art…

Read More

New Stanford student group bridges the arts, sciences and engineering

The group’s first art exhibition reflects knowledge-gathering and knowledge-making that are hallmarks of the university.

When two students saw more division than unity between the different academic disciplines on Stanford’s campus, they decided to build a community and call it ArtX. Katherine Yang is the co-founder of the ArtX student organization. (Image credit: L.A. Cicero) Launched in 2017 by Stanford students Ramin Ahmari, BS ’18 and MS ’18, and Katherine Yang,…

Read More

Art + Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-thon focuses on making a difference

The Bowes Art & Architecture Library will host an Art + Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-thon on Thursday, March 8, which is also International Women’s Day. Students, faculty, staff and community members are encouraged to drop in anytime between 9:30 a.m. and 5 p.m. to participate. Turns out that less than 10 percent of Wikipedia contributors identify…

Read More

Humanity, technology join hands in Life/Art/Science/Tech Festival at SLAC

Part of Stanford's celebration of Frankenstein@200, the fifth LAST Festival brings together artists and scientists for two days of exhibitions and talks that ponder the growing intersections of man and machine.

In the sculpture Feast of Eternity, salt crystals form delicate patterns along a 3D printed lattice that mimics the growth of stem cells to create bone. The hauntingly beautiful object resembling a human skull was designed by bioartist Amy Karle with the idea of “healing and enhancing a future body.” Karle uses medical technologies in…

Read More

Stanford undergraduates perform an adaptation of the 17th-century Spanish play Life Is a Dream with a new ending

Under the guest direction of Tony Award-winner Dominique Serrand, Stanford cast and crew explore age-old themes from a 17th-century Spanish play while incorporating modern questions of gender and ambiguity.

When adapting a play about destiny, changing the ending might seem like tempting fate, especially when that play is considered one of the greatest of the Spanish Golden Age. But for guest director Dominique Serrand, reimagining the classic tale Life Is a Dream for an audience of today means not only exploring timeless themes, but also transforming…

Read More

Neuroscience and music: A conversation with opera singer Renée Fleming

About a month before she opens on Broadway in the revival of Rodgers and Hammerstein’s Carousel, Renée Fleming is sitting in a broadcast booth talking to me about neuroscience and music. I’m able to grab time with the celebrated soprano to discuss Sound Health: Music and the Mind, a collaboration between the Kennedy Center, the National Institutes of Health, and the National Endowment for the Arts,…

Read More

Art collector and Stanford donor Harry “Hunk” Anderson dies at 95

The longtime friend of the university welcomed Stanford graduate students to study the art in his home and office, and then he and his family made the collection accessible to the world through a transformative gift.

Stanford neighbor, friend and philanthropist Harry W. “Hunk” Anderson died on Feb. 7 at his Bay Area Peninsula home surrounded by his family. He was 95. Harry W. “Hunk” Anderson(Image credit: L.A. Cicero) Anderson was the founder of the food service company Saga Corporation and, with his wife, Mary Margaret “Moo,” and daughter, Mary Patricia…

Read More

Stanford students take master class with L.A. Dance Project’s David Adrian Freeland Jr.

On Jan. 25, L.A. Dance Project’s David Adrian Freeland Jr. taught a master class for students at Roble Gym. Stanford Live sponsored the class and presented the company at Memorial Auditorium on Jan. 26 and 27. After a warmup based in Horton technique, the dancers moved across the floor with small jumps. Freeland taught a…

Read More

Stanford’s winter quarter guest artists

Stanford in winter is a hotbed of creativity and artistic expression. The extensive roster of guest artists on campus includes actor/alum Sterling K. Brown, recent winner of the Golden Globe for best actor in a TV drama series and the first African-American male in history to do so, with fellow actor/alum Ryan Michelle Bathe performing…

Read More

Take an art break at the Stanford museums

The Anderson Collection and the Cantor Arts Center are open during the winter break except on Christmas Day, with special holiday hours on Christmas Eve and New Year’s Eve only.

There are things to see and hear, inside and outside, at the Stanford art museums during the holiday season.  While the rest of the campus is closed from Dec. 23 through Jan. 7, the Anderson Collection and the Cantor Arts Center welcome visitors to enjoy both wide-ranging temporary exhibitions and the museums’ stellar permanent collections.…

Read More

GSE tells the story of Paul Hanna and Hanna House, designed by Frank Lloyd Wright

Enterprising education professor bequeathed to Stanford a Frank Lloyd Wright showplace and a growing role in U.S. and global affairs

Enterprising education professor bequeathed to Stanford a Frank Lloyd Wright showplace and a growing role in U.S. and global affairs Stanford University Archives Nestled into a hill of faculty housing on Stanford’s Frenchman’s Lane, Frank Lloyd Wright’s 1937 Hanna House is a hexagonal hive of redwood and glass. It is internationally known — and on the National Register…

Read More

At Stanford in Washington, arts are inside and outside the classroom

SIW’s public exhibition grapples with issues of politics and the press, and students consider memorials, the American flag and censorship in the arts.

Questions about the role of the press and social media, history and memory, ideological past and future are all rich subjects to explore in a classroom in the nation’s capital. They are also the questions that artist Xiaoze Xie, the Paul L. and Phyllis Wattis Professor of Art at Stanford, poses in his public exhibition Confrontation and…

Read More

Three wise women meet the baby King in Stanford production

What if when the Magi went off to Bethlehem to meet the prophesied King, three wise women stayed behind and ended up meeting the baby King in a shared dream vision? This is the premise of Conrad Susa’s one-act opera The Wise Women: A Christmas Mystery Fable, presented by the Department of Music and the Office…

Read More

Education Professor John Willinsky rocks free sharing in music and scholarship

Prof. John Willinsky rocks free sharing in music and scholarship When John Willinsky, the Khosla Family Professor of Education, came to Stanford a decade ago from Vancouver, Canada, he brought his leadership of the Public Knowledge Project, which promotes and studies the sharing of research and scholarship as a public good. He also brought his electric guitar. Today, Willinsky’s…

Read More

President Tatertot-Lasagna saves Gaieties from the evil Oski

President Marc Tessier-Lavigne made an unexpected appearance at Gaieties this year, saving the production from the evil Oski.

Surprise cameo appearances by university administrators have come to be a tradition for Gaieties, the annual student-written, musical extravaganza that makes fun of all things Cal. The Gaieties performance, produced by Ram’s Head, takes place in the week leading up to Big Game and is one of many events meant to rouse school spirit. Last week,…

Read More

New exhibition at Hoover Institution and Cantor Arts Center marks centenary of 1917 Russian Revolution

A joint exhibition at the Hoover Institution Library & Archives and the Cantor Arts Center highlights Stanford’s rich collections of materials on the history of late imperial and early Soviet Russia.

Drafts of the last Russian czar’s abdication letter, painted portraits of Russian rulers from the 18th and 19th centuries, photographs of massive street demonstrations in Petrograd and Moscow in 1917, and early Soviet-era propaganda posters – these are just some of the artifacts on display at the Hoover Institution Library & Archives and the Cantor Arts Center as part…

Read More