New Stanford student group bridges the arts, sciences and engineering

The group’s first art exhibition reflects knowledge-gathering and knowledge-making that are hallmarks of the university.

When two students saw more division than unity between the different academic disciplines on Stanford’s campus, they decided to build a community and call it ArtX. Katherine Yang is the co-founder of the ArtX student organization. (Image credit: L.A. Cicero) Launched in 2017 by Stanford students Ramin Ahmari, BS ’18 and MS ’18, and Katherine Yang,…

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Humanity, technology join hands in Life/Art/Science/Tech Festival at SLAC

Part of Stanford's celebration of Frankenstein@200, the fifth LAST Festival brings together artists and scientists for two days of exhibitions and talks that ponder the growing intersections of man and machine.

In the sculpture Feast of Eternity, salt crystals form delicate patterns along a 3D printed lattice that mimics the growth of stem cells to create bone. The hauntingly beautiful object resembling a human skull was designed by bioartist Amy Karle with the idea of “healing and enhancing a future body.” Karle uses medical technologies in…

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Infectious-disease expert explains data via sculptures, contraptions

Many infectious diseases, including malaria, are marked by cyclical ups and downs. David Schneider takes a creative approach to making sense of those ups and downs.

On a wall-mounted shelf in the office of David Schneider sit two-dozen or more empty Diet Coke bottles of varying shapes and sizes. They’re emblazoned with various languages, testifying to all the places he’s downed one of the beverages. He’s not a coffee drinker. There’s also a nice bug collection displayed on the wall. Schneider, PhD, professor…

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Neuroscience and music: A conversation with opera singer Renée Fleming

About a month before she opens on Broadway in the revival of Rodgers and Hammerstein’s Carousel, Renée Fleming is sitting in a broadcast booth talking to me about neuroscience and music. I’m able to grab time with the celebrated soprano to discuss Sound Health: Music and the Mind, a collaboration between the Kennedy Center, the National Institutes of Health, and the National Endowment for the Arts,…

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Science meets art at Stanford

Science and art are often regarded as distinct – either a person can’t be serious about both or an interest in one must relate somehow to work in the other. In reality, many scientists participate in and produce art at all levels and in every medium. Here are just a few of these people –…

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Stanford community participates in intuitive/rational creative exercise

Artist and lecturer Pamela Davis Kivelson conducts a group draw.

The intersection of science, music, art and improvisation has long fascinated experimental artist Pamela Davis Kivelson. Her latest foray into the busy intersection – Drawing with Gravitational Waves – reaches out of this world. Video by Kurt Hickman Artist Pamela Davis Kivelson created a participatory performance piece with violinist and scientist Lucy Liuxuan Zhang and creative coder…

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New exhibition at Hoover Institution and Cantor Arts Center marks centenary of 1917 Russian Revolution

A joint exhibition at the Hoover Institution Library & Archives and the Cantor Arts Center highlights Stanford’s rich collections of materials on the history of late imperial and early Soviet Russia.

Drafts of the last Russian czar’s abdication letter, painted portraits of Russian rulers from the 18th and 19th centuries, photographs of massive street demonstrations in Petrograd and Moscow in 1917, and early Soviet-era propaganda posters – these are just some of the artifacts on display at the Hoover Institution Library & Archives and the Cantor Arts Center as part…

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Stanford dance class brings performance to the Anderson Collection

Students in Stanford’s dance improvisation lab take their inspiration from The Anderson Collection at Stanford.

The latest Dance Improv Strategies Lab taught students that performance can happen anywhere at anytime. It could be at a theater or dance hall, or a less traditional venue like a museum or even a city street. For their final project, students chose any area in or around the Anderson Collection at Stanford University and…

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Stanford literary scholars reflect on Jane Austen’s legacy

English Professor Alex Woloch and two doctoral students discuss author Jane Austen’s writing style and why her novels still dominate literary and popular culture 200 years after her death.

Two centuries after Jane Austen’s death, the early 19th-century English author’s words persist in our culture. This drawing of Jane Austen was made by her sister, Cassandra, around 1810. (Image credit: National Portrait Gallery, London) Austen, who died on July 18, 1817, at 41, is known for her six completed novels, among them the highly adapted Pride…

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Stanford Libraries’ rare score of Giuseppe Verdi’s opera Aida provides clues to the past

The 1876 manuscript is believed to be the only surviving score from a performance conducted by Italian composer Giuseppe Verdi and presents a unique research opportunity for historians and musicologists.

A rare, orchestral score of Italian composer Giuseppe Verdi’s opera Aida has become a valuable source of instruction and inspiration for Stanford scholars. The handwritten manuscript, used in Aida’s Paris premiere in 1876, appears to be the earliest surviving copy of the famous opera’s full score – and the only surviving score from a performance…

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Thousands of Rome’s historical images digitized with help of Stanford researchers

Researchers digitized thousands of pieces from 19th-century archaeologist Rodolfo Lanciani’s collection to help scholars across the world study Rome’s transformation.

A team including Stanford researchers created a new digital archive to study Rome’s transformation over the centuries. The exhibit, which went online in the spring, consists of almost 4,000 digitized drawings, prints, photographs and sketches of historic Rome from the 16th to 20th centuries. The pieces were collected by renowned Roman archaeologist Rodolfo Lanciani, who…

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Dance faculty member seeks common ground in the rural West

Alex Ketley's film documents his research about the role dance plays in rural life and challenges the "urban/rural prejudice" commonly found in urban environments.

In 2012, Alex Ketley identified a pattern in his work as a dancer and choreographer: he had worked almost exclusively in urban centers and performed for city-based audiences – most of whom were already accustomed to modern dance. “It was almost like preaching to the choir,” Ketley mused. Creating work for like-minded patrons in art-saturated…

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Faculty and students at Stanford argue for increased study of games and interactive media

Faculty, staff and students are pushing the Stanford community to embrace and pursue the study of games and interactive media, an interdisciplinary, applicable and socially relevant topic.

Three years ago, a group of Stanford faculty and staff came together to discuss the scholarly value of games and interactive media. These discussions resulted in the weekly Interactive Media and Games Seminar Series, which is open to students, the Stanford community and the public. Led by Ingmar Riedel-Kruse, an assistant professor of bioengineering, and…

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Stanford Mohr Visiting Artist Majel Connery reimagines the string quartet

A team of visiting artists teach the theatricality of musical performance.

What happens when you imagine the string quartet as a theatrical genre? How can the inherent showmanship of the four musicians expand to interact with voice, acting and operatic performance? These are the questions Mohr Visiting Artist Majel Connery examined in her winter class, Theatricality and the String Quartet, with help from Pulitzer Prize-winning composer…

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Stanford Live features world-class artists, integrates them into campus life

When the Danish String Quartet visited campus this past October, the members didn’t simply drop in for a public performance of Wallin, Janácek and Beethoven at Bing Concert Hall and head home. They also joined in a chamber music reading session with students and the St. Lawrence String Quartet, Stanford’s ensemble-in-residence. “They all read together…

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Stanford alum returns to campus as visiting artist to explore connections between his art and other disciplines

Sculptor Will Clift creates multiple intersections with a range of disciplines, including dance and music in a multimedia production in Bing Concert Hall’s Gunn Atrium.

When artist Will Clift, BS ’02, MS ’03, was at Stanford, his course load included classes on nearly everything but making art. As an undergraduate he majored in integrative design, an individually designed program that combined engineering, philosophy and psychology. He then earned a master’s degree in management science and engineering. With the exception of…

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