Stanford alum returns to campus as visiting artist to explore connections between his art and other disciplines

When artist Will Clift, BS ’02, MS ’03, was at Stanford, his course load included classes on nearly everything but making art. As an undergraduate he majored in integrative design, an individually designed program that combined engineering, philosophy and psychology. He then earned a master’s degree in management science and engineering. With the exception of…

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Exhibit explores the intersection of art and engineering and its impact on California’s water history

The archive of HELEN and NEWTON HARRISON is featured in an interdisciplinary exhibit now on display at the Green Library. Terraforming: Art and Engineering in the Sacramento Watershed is on view in the Peterson Gallery, Green Library Bing Wing, through April 30. Curated by PhD candidates LAURA CASSIDY ROGERS (Modern Thought and Literature) and EMILY…

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Camille Utterback: “Sustaining Presence” at the Stanford Art Gallery

The Department of Art & Art History at Stanford University presents Sustaining Presence, on view from January 24 to March 26, 2017 with a reception on Thursday, January 26, from 5-7 PM, at the Stanford Art Gallery. This solo exhibition by Camille Utterback, Assistant Professor in Art & Art History, highlights computationally generated and interactive…

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Stanford physicist makes speed-of-light art

On Oct. 28, THOMAS JUFFMANN, a postdoctoral fellow in physics, will present at Vision+Light: Extending the Senses, an event at UC Berkeley that celebrates the intersection of art and science. Juffmann, who works with Phillip Haslinger of UC Berkeley and artist Enar de Dios Rodríguez of the San Francisco Art Institute, uses advanced imaging technology…

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Yellow is the new orange

 stanfordarts. Jennie Yang, ’19, has long loved science and art. She explains in a post for Cross-Sections, @CantorArts’s art-conservation blog, “I would take all sorts of math-y science-y classes in high school, but I’d be painting and playing the viola at the same time.” Now she’s a student in the Materials Science and Engineering Department, and…

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High school students plunge into history, philosophy, art and science

Each summer, high school students fill the halls of the Stanford Humanities Center to grapple with questions that have dogged humankind for millennia: whether ideas create social change, or if the collective good trumps individual rights, for example. Such fundamental questions animate the Summer Humanities Institute, which welcomed 135 students this summer – up from…

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Stanford students replicate museum objects from the Cantor Arts Center

What is the most important aspect of a replica? Physical attributes or capturing the maker’s intent? Stanford students from two spring courses explored this question with the help of the Cantor Arts Center’s Art + Science Learning Lab. Kristen Haring’s history students and Hideo Mabuchi’s applied physics students 3-D printed and hand-built from clay two…

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Finalists announced for Stanford’s 2016 Art of Neuroscience competition

Eleven images representing a broad cross section of neuroscience research have been chosen as finalists in the Stanford Neuroscience Institute’s Art of Neuroscience competition. Submitted by students, faculty, postdoctoral scholars and other scientists, the images range from the intricately detailed, such as a spider-like neurons or arrays of cells that send visual signals to the…

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Living, learning together while immersed in art at Stanford

After a year of living and learning together, students in ITALIC (Immersion in the Arts: Living in Culture) inhabit the Cantor Arts Center for an afternoon of critical expression. Their capstone project encouraged students to search for an inspiring piece of art or physical environment and then respond in an analytical and aesthetically expressive manner.…

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Stanford Arts Institute fellows examine the role of art in cities

Beijing, Mexico City and Mumbai are cities whose recent histories have notably been reconsidered, and are being rebuilt with art as a central lens. According to two new Stanford Arts Institute (SAI) fellows, Detroit and New Orleans belong on that list of cities as well. The scholars will be researching the role that arts are…

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Comics like Hellboy produce a heightened adventure of reading, Stanford scholar says

The Hellboy comics – about a demon who tries to resist his predestined role to destroy our world – provide a powerful vantage point from which to view the extraordinary and unique powers of the comic book medium, a Stanford scholar suggests. That is the viewpoint of Scott Bukatman, a Stanford professor of film and…

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The Live Context of War

Imagine a world in which the barriers between art and society, university and community, and mind and heart are erased, and creative synthesis becomes the norm. Such is the vision from which Stanford Live’s Live Context: Art + Ideas was born. This season’s two extraordinary Live Context: Art + Ideas series, War: Return & Recovery and Arts & Social Change,…

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Warrior’s view of the Battle of the Little Bighorn on display at Stanford’s Cantor Arts Center

A rare exhibition of 12 drawings by acclaimed artist Red Horse, a Sioux warrior who fought against George Armstrong Custer and the U.S. Cavalry at the Battle of the Little Bighorn in 1876, is on display at Stanford’s Cantor Arts Center through May 9. Exhibition of 12 drawings by Red Horse, a Minneconjou Lakota Sioux…

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Stanford Library Blog: Opern-Typen: opera meets the comics

Opern-Tÿpen consists of six volumes of chromolithographic plates depicting scenes from 54 operas popular in 19th century Germany. Each opera plot has been distilled into a mere six frames, with liberally adapted accompanying text. The visual charms of Opern-Typen are evident. The plates reveal a sophisticated understanding of the effective use of line, gesture, and composition…

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Stanford students take listeners on a voyage of discovery

While studying “sky burials” in Mongolia, Reade Levinson amassed 20 hours of recordings, including interviews with Tibetan Buddhist lamas, conservation biologists and vulture experts, and the sound of dogs barking, monks praying and cars honking. Levinson, a senior majoring in Earth systems, spent last summer researching the funeral practice, in which monks place corpses –…

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Film director Werner Herzog visits Stanford to talk about literary classic on peregrine falcons

J.A. Baker wrote The Peregrine at a precarious moment in environmental history: By the 1960s, the falcons had almost vanished entirely from the English countryside, thanks to aggressive use of pesticides. Baker’s response, an ecstatic panegyric to peregrines, stunned critics with its originality, power and beauty. The little-known 1967 masterpiece will be the subject of…

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