Humanities

Science meets art at Stanford

Science and art are often regarded as distinct – either a person can’t be serious about both or an interest in one must relate somehow to work in the other. In reality, many scientists participate in and produce art at all levels and in every medium. Here are just a few of these people –…

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Stanford community participates in intuitive/rational creative exercise

The intersection of science, music, art and improvisation has long fascinated experimental artist Pamela Davis Kivelson. Her latest foray into the busy intersection – Drawing with Gravitational Waves – reaches out of this world. Video by Kurt Hickman Artist Pamela Davis Kivelson created a participatory performance piece with violinist and scientist Lucy Liuxuan Zhang and creative coder…

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Three wise women meet the baby King in Stanford production

What if when the Magi went off to Bethlehem to meet the prophesied King, three wise women stayed behind and ended up meeting the baby King in a shared dream vision? This is the premise of Conrad Susa’s one-act opera The Wise Women: A Christmas Mystery Fable, presented by the Department of Music and the Office…

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Education Professor John Willinsky rocks free sharing in music and scholarship

Prof. John Willinsky rocks free sharing in music and scholarship When John Willinsky, the Khosla Family Professor of Education, came to Stanford a decade ago from Vancouver, Canada, he brought his leadership of the Public Knowledge Project, which promotes and studies the sharing of research and scholarship as a public good. He also brought his electric guitar. Today, Willinsky’s…

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Associate Professor Anna Schultz receives H. Colin Slim Award

Anna Schultz, Associate Professor (Ethnomusicology), was recently presented with the H. Colin Slim Award by the American Musicological Society during their annual meeting in Rochester, NY. The H. Colin Slim Award honors each year a musicological article of exceptional merit. For the year 2016, that honor has gone to “Sentimental Remembrance and the Amusements of Forgetting in Karl and Harty’s ‘Kentucky’,” by Sumanth Gopinath and Anna Schultz, published in…

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Stanford’s innovative program advancing the arts of the American West returns

Encouraged by standing-room-only attendance at last year’s ArtsWest public programs, the Bill Lane Center for the American West is continuing its series that celebrates and explores the rich cultural legacy of the region. This hand-colored portrait shows an actress in traditional Chinese theater costume. (Image credit: May’s Photo Studio, Stanford Department of Special Collections and University…

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20.8% of the 2017 MacArthur Fellows were Stanford guest artists within the last year

Stanford congratulates the MacArthur Foundation “genius grant” winners who recently spent time on campus engaging with students, faculty and the public. Nigerian-born, Los Angeles-based artist NJIDEKA AKUNYILI CROSBY, whose work tells elaborate and delicate stories of her life, was in conversation with Jodi Roberts, the Robert M. and Ruth L. Halperin Curator for Modern and…

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Stanford team brings medieval texts to a contemporary audience

The Middle Ages produced a staggering wealth of literary works, spanning dozens of languages and nearly 1,000 years. The question today is how to bring these texts to a modern audience who may not have specialized knowledge of medieval languages and contexts. The illustration depicts King Henry II of England demanding that the Arthurian romances…

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Stanford literary scholars reflect on Jane Austen’s legacy

Two centuries after Jane Austen’s death, the early 19th-century English author’s words persist in our culture. This drawing of Jane Austen was made by her sister, Cassandra, around 1810. (Image credit: National Portrait Gallery, London) Austen, who died on July 18, 1817, at 41, is known for her six completed novels, among them the highly adapted Pride…

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