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November 2017

Gallery Talk: Nina Katchadourian: Curiouser

November 24 11:30 am - 12:30 pm

Please join Veronica Roberts, Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art at the Blanton Museum of Art, for a Gallery Talk in Nina Katchadourian: Curiouser. Roberts was the curator of Curiouser at the Blanton, where the show originated. Nina Katchadourian: Curiouser explores several major bodies of work by celebrated Stanford-born, Brooklyn-based artist Nina Katchadourian including video, photography, sculpture, and sound art. Katchadourian’s work reveals the creative potential, to use the artist’s words, that “lurks within the mundane.” Using ingenuity and humor, her practice…

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Football and Mental Functioning: An Observational Study

November 27 1:10 pm - 2:30 pm

The Data, Society, and Inference Seminar Series is pleased to announce a talk by:   Dylan Small Statistics Department at The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania Abstract: Tackle football is the largest participation sport in US high schools. Recently, many have expressed concern about the sport’s safety with some even calling for banning youth and high school football. The sport also has staunch defenders. In this contested area, we conducted an observational study to examine the effect of playing high school…

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Publishing – Building Resonance with Players

November 28 4:30 pm - 6:00 pm

Dean Takahashi, Publishing – Building Resonance with Players. In this talk, Dean will provide an overview of the history of games journalism and highlight examples where developers have been particularly successful (and unsuccessful) at marketing their games. Dean will discuss strategies to build resonance with an audience and how developers can draw the right kind of attention to their games. Dean Takahashi is lead writer for GamesBeat at VentureBeat. He has been a tech journalist for more than 25 years,…

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Our Bodies Our Selves: Reproductive Rights at the January 21, 2017 Women’s March

November 28 5:15 pm - 7:00 pm

Part of American Studies 2nd Art & Social Criticism Lecture Series… This lecture takes a critical look at the proliferation of outspoken, unflinching, DIY signs on reproductive rights—expressions of agency and exuberant creative energy—at the January 21, 2017 Woman’s March. Hertz asks compelling questions about the imagery on these signs and what they communicate about reproduction,gender, and sexuality. The lecture takes stock of what we do and do not have in common, culturally and biologically, across various social markers including…

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How to Write Epic Fellowship Applications (Workshop #1)

November 28 5:30 pm - 6:30 pm

Join Hume Writing Center staff at the Haas Center for an evening of brainstorming and essay drafting. A great cure for writer’s block, this workshop will help you develop pages of ideas, a new set of writing tools, and the redefined focus and perspective you need to write a personal statement and essays for Post-Graduate Fellowship and Cardinal Quarter applications.

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Séverine Ballon, cello: Works for cello and multichannel electronics – NEW DATE!

November 28 7:30 pm - 9:00 pm

Séverine Ballon‘s work focuses on regular performance of key works of the cello repertoire, as well as numerous collaborations with composers; in addition, her research as an improviser have helped her to extend the sonic and technical resources of her instrument. She studied the cello at the Hochschule für Musik in Berlin and in Lübeck with Joseph Schwab and Troels Svane. During 2004-05, she was an academist at the Ensemble Modern (Internationale Ensemble Modern Akademie). She perfected her contemporary cello…

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A Conversation with Victoria Hanna

November 29 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Please note that this conversation will be in Hebrew Jerusalem-based Victoria Hanna is known for mesmerizing interpretations of traditional Jewish texts (both Hebrew and Aramaic) that combine traditional Middle Eastern sounds with contemporary genres, such as rap and hip-hop. But it was her first official video single, “Aleph-Bet,” that garnered more than 68,000 views in the first week, signaling that her unique, experimental sound is perhaps going more mainstream.

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NOON CONCERT: Flute Students of Greer Ellison

November 29 12:30 pm - 1:30 pm

Flute students are featured in this noontime concert. (Program TBA.) 

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DLCL Fall Film Series: Thin Red Line (1998) Terrence Malick

November 29 6:30 pm - 9:00 pm

Malick’s Thin Red Line pushes the concept of a nature film to its limits, as we explore the role of nature in the story of the Battle of Mount Austen in the Pacific Theater of World War II, originally written by James Jones.  With an all-star cast and lush scenery, Malick explores the deep resonances between the beauty of the Pacific, the intense subjectivity of battle, and the collective experience of an environment transformed by war.

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Victoria Hanna

November 29 7:00 pm - 8:30 pm

Jerusalem-based Victoria Hanna is known for mesmerizing interpretations of traditional Jewish texts (both Hebrew and Aramaic) that combine traditional Middle Eastern sounds with contemporary genres, such as rap and hip-hop. But it was her first official video single, “Aleph-Bet,” that garnered more than 68,000 views in the first week, signaling that her unique, experimental sound is perhaps going more mainstream. In the Bing Studio, she performs her existing repertoire and new work she is developing at the Magnes Collection of…

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“Her” and “Ex Machina”

November 29 7:30 pm - 9:45 pm

Film Studies 119/319 “Synthetic Humans” presents the critically acclaimed film Her and Ex Machina as part of the Frankenstein@200 Film Festival.

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Ancestral Cartographic Rituals (work-in-progress) | James Luna and Denise Uyehara

November 29 7:30 pm - 8:30 pm

What happens when Indigenous artists test their DNA? How do their findings confirm, authenticate, or contradict traditional creation stories?  In this new interdisciplinary work-in-progress, award-winning performance artists James Luna and Denise Uyehara investigate “cultural authenticity,” as it relates to Pacific Rim, evolution and migration, and the here and now. Ancestral Cartographic Rituals responds indirectly to current-day tribal DNA testing, incorporating live performance, video and original music which interweaves the past and present, autobiography and cultural identity, with poignancy and humor.…

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University Singers

November 29 7:30 pm - 9:00 pm

Robert Huw Morgan directs the University Singers’ performance of Brahms’ German Requiem, Op. 45, arranged for two pianos. Kumaran Arul and George Barth – both Department of Music faculty – are the collaborative pianists, while soprano Jasmine Ying Miller and baritone Kenneth Goodson are the featured soloists.

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The Evasive Bodies of May’s Photo Studio: Images from Chinatown

November 30 4:15 pm - 6:00 pm

Note the new time: begins at 4:15pm Join us for a lecture presented by Professor Marci Kwon (Art & Art History) as part of the Bill Lane Center for the American West’s ArtsWest series. As described by Professor Kwon, “This lecture will explore the remarkable body of photographs produced by May’s Photo Studio, the first Chinese-run photography studio in San Francisco’s Chinatown. From its opening in 1923 until the mid-1960s, wife-and-husband Isabella May Lee and Leo Chan documented weddings, special events, Cantonese opera productions,…

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The Place of Woodblock Illustrations in the Late-Ming Media Landscape

November 30 4:30 pm - 6:00 pm

Free and open to the public.  Please RSVP here. About the talk: Block illustrations allow the reader of a printed book to experience a space of visual and tactile relishing, an actual or aspirational connoisseuristic gesture that renders information, texts, or knowledge in the form of beguiling “things.” The late Ming (mid-sixteenth to mid-seventeenth centuries) is known as the golden age of Chinese woodblock illustrations. What claims on viewer-consumers’ attention and behavior were made by these illustrations, and how? This…

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Intersections: Artist Talk: Mary Weatherford with John Zurier

November 30 6:00 pm - 7:00 pm

Artist Mary Weatherford, whose piece black painting was gifted to the museum, will discuss her work and process with contemporary California abstract painter John Zurier. Mary Weatherford possesses a remarkable ability to overlap deep, sultry colors in abstract paintings that radiate light, energy and movement. Critics have praised the artist, born in 1963 in Ojai, Calif., for her achievements in layering vinyl-based acrylic paint known as Flashe, and for her distinctive use of deliberately draped neon lighting tubes that further electrify her…

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The Wise Women – Free preview for Stanford students, staff, and faculty

November 30 7:30 pm - 8:30 pm

Conrad Susa’s The Wise Women (A Christmas Mystery Fable) explores the Nativity story through the perspective of Three Wise Women. Left behind while the Wise Men journey with the guidance of the Star of Bethlehem, the Wise Women instead experience a shared vision of the Holy Mother and Child. Susa’s one-act church opera premiered in 1994; the libretto is by Philip Littell. Students from the Department of Music, as well as faculty, staff, and community members, perform The Wise Women in the glorious…

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PRODUCTION | FOUR: New Dances by Diane Frank, Aleta Hayes, Alex Ketley, and Ronnie Reddick

November 30 8:00 pm - 9:00 pm

FOUR: New Dances by Diane Frank, Aleta Hayes, Alex Ketley, and Ronnie Reddick brings together the original works of TAPS’ four faculty artist-choreographers in a concert of dance, live music, video art, and found objects. Showcasing a range of choreographic styles, movement, and visions, the pieces coalesce into a singular evening of dance that makes the case for movement, each one enacting a premise that originates through the body.  Frank’s dance, with its cool textures, decor, and deceivingly pedestrian objects, investigates…

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December 2017

Face/Interface: Type Design and Human-Computer Interaction Beyond the Western World

December 1 9:00 am - 5:30 pm

SCHEDULE* *Subject to Change FRIDAY DECEMBER 1, 2017 9:00-9:30: WELCOME Thomas S. Mullaney (Stanford University)Opening Remarks and Logistics 9:30-11:00 Fiona Ross, “Informing and Inspiring Non-Latin Type Design through Collections-based Research – with particular focus on South Asian Scripts” Thomas Huot-Marchand, “From the Imprimerie Nationale to ANRT (France): a Tradition of Designing Non-Latin Types for Scholarly Purpose” Craig Eliason, “The Picasso of Type: How ‘Exotic’ Scripts Catalyzed Bodoni’s Modern-Face Types” Introduction by Thomas S. Mullaney 11:00-11:15: COFFEE BREAK 11:15-12:45 Bruce Rosenblum,…

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NOON CONCERT: Piano Studio of George Barth and Kumaran Arul

December 1 12:30 pm - 1:30 pm

Piano students of George Barth and Kumaran Arul will be featured in this noontime recital. (Program TBA.) 

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Stanford Symphony Orchestra

December 1 7:30 pm - 9:30 pm

The Stanford Symphony Orchestra welcomes its new conductor, Paul Phillips! The SSO opens its 2017-18 season with music from France and Russia, along with a work by the acclaimed Finnish composer Kaija Saariaho, a Helsinki native who has lived in Paris since 1982, bridging both musical worlds. Her “oceanic” tone poem, Ciel d’hiver (“Winter Sky”), beautifully complements Debussy’s La Mer. Berlioz’s Roman Carnival Overture and Tchaikovsky’s “Rococo” Variations, performed by Concerto Competition winner Danna Xue, round out the program. Program Hector…

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CANCELED – Voice Studio of Kathryne Jennings

December 1 7:30 pm - 9:00 pm

This event has been rescheduled on December 3rd.

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The Wise Women

December 1 7:30 pm - 9:00 pm

Conrad Susa’s The Wise Women (A Christmas Mystery Fable) explores the Nativity story through the perspective of Three Wise Women. Left behind while the Wise Men journey with the guidance of the Star of Bethlehem, the Wise Women instead experience a shared vision of the Holy Mother and Child. Susa’s one-act church opera premiered in 1994; the libretto is by Philip Littell. Students from the Department of Music, as well as faculty, staff, and community members, perform The Wise Women in the glorious…

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Mia Farinelli, soprano: Voice Recital – NEW DATE!

December 1 7:30 pm - 9:00 pm

Mia Farinelli’s program will feature songs and arias. She will be accompanied by Kevin Tang, clarinet, and others to be announced. | Note: This concert has been rescheduled from Nov. 11. Program Mozart: An ChloëKovàcs: Hommage à Manuel de Falla Hahn: À Chloris, L’heure éxquise, and Quand je fus pris au PavillonMozart: Parto, parto, ma tu ben mioSchumann: Three RomancesBellini: Vaga luna che inargentiMoore: Dearest MamaSchubert: Der Hirt auf dem Felsen

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Betty Buckley

December 1 8:00 pm - 9:00 pm

In an award-winning career that has encompassed TV, film, stage, and concert work around the globe, Betty Buckley is probably best known as the quintessential musical theater actress with her legendary performances in 1776, Cats, and Sunset Boulevard to name a few. It’s no wonder she’s been dubbed the “Voice of Broadway.” At the Bing, the Tony winner will walk us through highlights from Broadway and beyond in her new album Story Songs.

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CANCELED – Victor Arnautoff and the Politics of Art at Stanford

December 2 10:30 am - 12:00 pm

Speaker: Robery W. Cherny, Professor Emeritus of History, San Francisco State University Robert Cherny’s talk will cover Victor Arnautoff’s life and career, with special attention to his 24 years as a faculty member of the Stanford Art Department. Arnautoff (1896-1979) was brought before the House Un-American Activities Committee in 1956 and took the 5th Amendment. Cherny will focus on Arnautoff’s experience with Wallace Sterling and the Stanford Advisory Board in the mid-1950s against the context of this controversy. He will…

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Talking about a Revolution: Gallery Talk Series

December 2 12:00 pm - 12:30 pm

The Brave New World of Soviet Political Posters This gallery talk with Bertrand Patenaude, research fellow, Hoover Institution Library & Archives, highlights how the new Soviet regime pioneered the political propaganda poster and examines recurring themes, symbols, and messages. MORE TALKS IN THIS SERIES: OCTOBER 19, 12PM, An Introduction to The Crown under the Hammer: Russia, Romanovs, Revolution with Jodi Roberts, Robert M. and Ruth L. Halperin Curator for Modern and Contemporary Art, Cantor Arts Center OCTOBER 21, 1PM, Russia’s Crown under Armand HAMMER!  with Edward Kasinec, visiting…

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Gallery Talk: Nina Katchadourian: Curiouser

December 2 2:00 pm - 2:30 pm

Please join Jennifer Carty, Associate Curator at Cantor Arts Center, for a Gallery Talk in Nina Katchadourian: Curiouser. Katchadourian: Curiouser explores several major bodies of work by celebrated Stanford-born, Brooklyn-based artist Nina Katchadourian (b. 1968), including video, photography, sculpture, and sound art. Katchadourian’s work reveals the creative potential, to use the artist’s words, that “lurks within the mundane”. Using ingenuity and humor, her practice encourages us to reinvigorate our own sense of curiosity and creativity, and to see our everyday…

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Gallery Talk: Nina Katchadourian: Curiouser

December 2 2:00 pm - 2:30 pm

Please join Jennifer Carty, Assistant Curator at Cantor Arts Center, for a Gallery Talk in Nina Katchadourian: Curiouser. Nina Katchadourian: Curiouser explores several major bodies of work by celebrated Stanford-born, Brooklyn-based artist Nina Katchadourian including video, photography, sculpture, and sound art. Katchadourian’s work reveals the creative potential, to use the artist’s words, that “lurks within the mundane.” Using ingenuity and humor, her practice encourages us to reinvigorate our own sense of curiosity and creativity, and to see our everyday surroundings as a…

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Play: The War Owl

December 2 6:30 pm - 8:00 pm

The War Owl looks at the evils of war as initially rendered in Iran’s grand epic poem, Shahnameh, and revisited by Bahar, the country’s twentieth century master lyricist. The play is written and directed by Reza Allamehzadeh, with the solo performance of Hamid Abdolmaleki and live musical accompaniment by Faramarz Aslani.  Part of the Stanford Festival of Iranian Arts

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Fleet Street: Winter Show 2017

December 2 6:30 pm - 8:00 pm

The time-honored “Winter Show” showcases the wacky antics and mellifluous voices of Stanford’s favorite comedy a cappella group. The performance will feature Fleet Street originals including never-before-heard arrangements, never-before-seen videos and live skits, and a touch of holiday music (with a twist!). The show is family-friendly and fun for people of all backgrounds.

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The Haydn Project

December 2 7:30 pm - 9:00 pm

Take four musicians, ninety-three string quartets, and the genius of Franz Josef Haydn: Stir vigorously and applaud wildly. San Francisco Chamber Orchestra All-Stars Ben Simon, Robin Sharp, Julie Kim, and Hannah Addario-Berry are the Haydn Project, launched in September 2013 to boldly go where few quartets have gone before—a journey of exploration into the mostly brilliant, always inventive, enormously engaging ninety-plus string quartets of “Papa” Haydn. This special event will include a short presentation about Haydn by San Francisco Chamber…

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Stanford Afro-Latin Jazz Ensemble: Fall Concert

December 2 7:30 pm - 9:30 pm

The ensemble presents a unique blend of traditional and contemporary songs spanning the entire scope of the Afro-Latin genre, mixed together in new and exciting ways. The evening includes songs composed or performed by greats such as Celia Cruz, Sonora Ponceña, Issac Delgado, Rubén Blades, and the Spanish Harlem Orchestra.  There is something for everyone — American jazz standards, rumba, classic salsa, Cuban timba and Latin jazz — and you will definitely *feel* the rhythm! Directed by Murray Low, the…

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Stanford Symphony Orchestra

December 2 7:30 pm - 8:30 pm

The Stanford Symphony Orchestra welcomes its new conductor, Paul Phillips! The SSO opens its 2017-18 season with music from France and Russia, along with a work by the acclaimed Finnish composer Kaija Saariaho, a Helsinki native who has lived in Paris since 1982, bridging both musical worlds. Her “oceanic” tone poem, Ciel d’hiver (“Winter Sky”), beautifully complements Debussy’s La Mer. Berlioz’s Roman Carnival Overture and Tchaikovsky’s “Rococo” Variations, performed by Concerto Competition winner Danna Xue, round out the program. Program Hector…

Find out more »

The Wise Women

December 2 7:30 pm - 9:00 pm

Conrad Susa’s The Wise Women (A Christmas Mystery Fable) explores the Nativity story through the perspective of Three Wise Women. Left behind while the Wise Men journey with the guidance of the Star of Bethlehem, the Wise Women instead experience a shared vision of the Holy Mother and Child. Susa’s one-act church opera premiered in 1994; the libretto is by Philip Littell. Students from the Department of Music, as well as faculty, staff, and community members, perform The Wise Women in the glorious…

Find out more »

Rolston String Quartet

December 3 2:30 pm - 4:00 pm

Rising Canadian stars the Rolston Quartet (Luri Lee, violin; Jeffrey Dyrda, violin; Hezekiah Leung, viola; and Jonathan Lo, cello) came together in Banff in 2013, eventually winning first prize at the prestigious Banff International String Quartet Competition in 2016. That same year, the ensemble won the John Lad Prize, which brings it to the Stanford Live stage. On the program: works by Beethoven, Tchaikovsky, and Canadian composer and educator R. Murray Schafer.

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Voice Studio of Kathryne Jennings

December 3 7:00 pm - 8:30 pm

Students in Katheryne Jennings’ voice studio present a recital (Program TBA.) This event was rescheduled from December 1st.

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Ranch de Love

December 4 12:00 am

The Hybrid Print 2017 The works in this exhibit explore hybrid artistic processes that tie together contemporary digital practices and traditional printmaking. Collographs, dye sublimation, monographs, 3-d printing, pigment prints, and vinyl cuts all collide and converge in these works of art. Curated by: Amber Imrie-Situnayake & Gail Wight Works by: Eleanor Brock, Harry Cole, Ryan Fong, Connor Gilmore, Nicolette Grabiec, Daniel Hills-Bunnell, Vivienne Le, Annie Ng, Loren Pilorin, Olivia Popp, Emily Rapada VISITOR INFORMATION: The Mohr Student Gallery is located on…

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The Ghost Ship Fire. One Year Later

December 4 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

A Conversation about the Hazards of Starting out as an Artist. Featuring:Cynthia Daignault, Stanford B.A., 2001Kamau Patton, Stanford M.F.A., 2007Michelle Kuo, Stanford B.A., 1999Alexander Nemerov, Moderator Image: Gustave le Gray. Brig in Moonlight.  VISITOR INFORMATION: Oshman Hall is located in the McMurtry Building on Stanford’s campus, at 355 Roth Way. Visitor parking is free after 4pm on weekdays, except by the oval. Alternatively, take the Caltrain to Palo Alto Transit Center and hop on the free Stanford Marguerite Shuttle. Subscribe to announcements alike

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How to Write Epic Fellowship Applications (Workshop #2)

December 4 5:30 pm - 6:30 pm

Join Hume Writing Center staff at the Haas Center for an evening of brainstorming and essay drafting. A great cure for writer’s block, this workshop will help you develop pages of ideas, a new set of writing tools, and the redefined focus and perspective you need to write a personal statement and essays for Post-Graduate Fellowship and Cardinal Quarter applications.

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Apologizing for Genocide: In/Justice, Reconciliation, and Indigenous Peoples in Australia (and the United States)

December 4 6:30 pm - 8:00 pm

Image credit: Barbara Ries © 2013 On February 13, 2008, as his first official act as Prime Minister, Kevin Rudd formally apologized to the country’s indigenous communities for their prolonged maltreatment. In particular, in “the Apology” Rudd brought attention to Australia’s infamous “Stolen Generations,” countless Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (ATSI) children kidnapped from their families by the government and placed with whites in an effort to “modernize” and “civilize” them. In asking indigenous Australians to forgive the unforgiveable, to begin healing the unhealable, Rudd also looked ahead, adding “The…

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Designing for Feeling

December 5 4:30 pm - 6:00 pm

Robin Hunicke, Designing for Feeling. Robin will describe how to put the final polish on a great player experience and a call to action of what to do with the game after it’s complete. This talk will also cover Robin’s personal path, lessons learned from Journey, and leadership at Funomena. Robin Hunicke is the Co-Founder of the independent game studio Funomena, which creates experimental games for Console, PC, VR & AR platforms (Luna, Woorld and Wattam) in the heart of…

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Human Cities Expo 2017

December 6 12:00 am

Free and open to the public.  Please RSVP here.  Join us for the annual Stanford Human Cities Expo, a day-long celebration bringing together interdisciplinary perspectives on advancing a human-centered approach to cities. The Fall 2017 Expo features interactive exhibits, presentations from Human Cities Initiative classes, and keynotes from distinguished scholars and practitioners. Special highlights include an interactive project Fluid Cities, and community-based projects in Hong Kong, Beijing, and the San Francisco Bay Area. Exhibition hall open from 11am-6pm Schedule: 11am-12:00pm: Carol Mancke…

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Talking about a Revolution: Gallery Talk Series

December 6 12:00 pm - 12:30 pm

Hidden in Plain Sight Learn behind the scenes stories of some of the objects on view in the exhibition with Marissa Schleicher Rhee, project archivist for exhibitions, Hoover Institution Library & Archives. MORE TALKS IN THIS SERIES: OCTOBER 19, 12PM, An Introduction to The Crown under the Hammer: Russia, Romanovs, Revolution with Jodi Roberts, Robert M. and Ruth L. Halperin Curator for Modern and Contemporary Art, Cantor Arts Center OCTOBER 21, 1PM, Russia’s Crown under Armand HAMMER!  with Edward Kasinec, visiting fellow, Hoover Institution Library & Archives  …

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NOON CONCERT: SLSQ Emerging String Quartet Program – Tesla Quartet

December 6 12:30 pm - 1:30 pm

Praised for their “superb capacity to find the inner heart of everything they play, regardless of era, style or technical demand” (The International Review of Music), the Tesla Quartet — named for the inventor and futurist Nikola Tesla — brings refinement and prowess to both new and established repertoire. The Tesla Quartet was recently announced as the winner of this year’s John Lad prize, presented annually by the St. Lawrence String Quartet to exceptional emerging chamber ensembles. “Though free to think and…

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DLCL Fall Film Series: Samsara (2011) Ron Fricke

December 6 6:30 pm - 9:00 pm

Ron Fricke’s visual spectacle Samsara harkens back to the tradition of silent nature films while incorporating the specific imagery and anxieties of the twenty-first century.  Filmed in 25 countries around the world over the course of five years, Samsara probes tensions between the sublimity of faith, modern technology, and natural wonders, and the mundanity and ferocity of everyday human experience that only film, with a variety of cutting-edge cinematographic techniques and technologies, can capture.

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Fall Chamber Music Showcase

December 6 7:30 pm - 9:00 pm

Ensembles from the Stanford Chamber Music program perform works by Arensky, Beethoven, Brahms, Dvořák, Haydn, Mendelssohn, Mozart, Schubert, Schumann, Shostakovich, and Stravinsky.

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“Westworld”

December 6 7:30 pm - 9:45 pm

Film Studies 119/319 “Synthetic Humans” presents portions of the critically acclaimed series Westworld as part of the Frankenstein@200 Film Festival.

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Early Music Singers: Music of the Reformation

December 6 7:30 pm - 9:00 pm

William Mahrt directs the Early Music Singers’ program, “Music of the Reformation,” which marks the 500th anniversary of the Reformation with music by Ludwig Senfl, Johann Walter, Hans Leo Hassler, Michael Praetorius, and Heinrich Schütz.

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A Bridge Taken for a Wall, a Wall Taken for a Bridge: On Persian Art, Poetry, and Translation

December 7 6:30 pm - 8:30 pm

Jahan Ramazani is University Professor and Edgar F. Shannon Professor of English at the University of Virginia. He is currently writing a book on poetry in a global age. This talk on poetry, art, and East-West translation ranges from ancient Iran to medieval Byzantium and the Abbasid era to modern Iran and Ireland. The lecture is in three parts. The first looks at the Persian artistic influences via Byzantium on a modern Irish poet that have passed largely unrecognized (a bridge…

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Open Studios: Fall | 2017

December 8 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Open Studios is a self-guided art tour of our undergraduate student showcase from the Fall 2017 Art Practice courses: Drawing, Painting, Printmaking, Digital Art, Sculpture, Film and more..! This is a rare opportunity to see student artwork in the studios in which it was created. Previous, Open Studio, photos can be viewed here VISITOR INFORMATION:The McMurtry Building is located on Stanford’s campus, at 355 Roth Way. The Stanford Art Gallery, room AG110 is located at the rear of the Art Gallery…

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The Red Violin

December 8 7:30 pm - 9:30 pm

Canadian violinist Lara St. John, with the help of members of the Stanford Philharmonia, performs the score at a screening of The Red Violin, an engaging film about an antique instrument made in Cremona, Italy. The story follows this violin’s odyssey from Europe to modern Montreal, tracing its path through four centuries and five countries and bringing ill fortune to all who play it. Can the curse be broken? This film is rated R

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Stanford Flute Ensemble

December 8 7:30 pm - 9:00 pm

Karen Van Dyke directs the Stanford Flute Ensemble’s program of works by Bizet, McMichael, Pixinghina, and others.

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A Festival of Lessons and Carols

December 8 7:30 pm - 9:00 pm

All are welcome to this Service of Advent and Christmas readings and music, based on the famous Lessons and Carols Service held annually at King’s College, Cambridge. Festive music will be sung by the Memorial Church Choir and the Stanford Chamber Chorale.

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Gallery Talk: Rodin: Shock of the Modern Body

December 9 2:00 pm - 2:30 pm

Melissa A. Yuen, Curatorial Fellow for American and European Art to 1900, discusses Rodin’s working process in Rodin: Shock of the Modern Body. At the time of his death, Auguste Rodin (France, 1840-1917) was counted among the most renowned artists in the world. A century later, after numerous reassessments by generations of art historians, Rodin continues to be recognized for making figurative sculpture modern by redefining the expressive capacity of the human form. This installation spans three galleries and features nearly…

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Friends of Music Holiday Musicale – NEW TIME!

December 9 2:30 pm - 4:00 pm

The Friends of Music at Stanford present their annual holiday showcase in Memorial Church featuring the Stanford Chamber Chorale, members of the Stanford Symphony Orchestra, and organist Adrienne Kelly Lim. Featured will be Corelli’s beloved Christmas Concerto; seasonal carols by Gjeilo and Rutter; and the choral-orchestral version of Fauré’s haunting Pavane. Adrienne Kelly LimBach, Chorale Prelude on “In dulci jubilo” and more TBA Chamber ChoraleGjeilo: Spotless RoseTraditional, arr. Davies: Christmas is comingRutter: There is a flowerTraditional, arr. Kay: Somerset WassailPierpont,…

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A Festival of Lessons and Carols

December 9 7:30 pm - 9:00 pm

All are welcome to this Service of Advent and Christmas readings and music, based on the famous Lessons and Carols Service held annually at King’s College, Cambridge. Festive music will be sung by the Memorial Church Choir and the Stanford Chamber Chorale.

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The Hot Sardines’ Holiday Stomp

December 9 7:30 pm - 9:00 pm

Dance ‘til you drop to a yuletide blend of hot jazz, including swinging renditions of classics like The Nutcracker Suite and “White Christmas” and less traditional tunes like Ella Fitzgerald’s “Santa Claus Got Stuck in My Chimney.” All this and the Hot Sardines, too, full of the brass and dazzle of their New York home and a year of sold-out engagements. Join us on the dance floor and shimmy your way to the holidays in style.

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Second Sunday: Family Day

December 10 11:00 am - 4:00 pm

SECOND SUNDAY is a free, family-focused day of art talks, hands-on art making, and gallery adventures for visitors of all ages. Registration is not required and families can tailor their museum experience based on their schedule and the activities that interest them most. CANTOR & ANDERSON Drop-in Studio: Experiment with art materials and new techniques by participating in a hands-on art making experience. All visitors, regardless of age, ability, or familiarity with the creative process, are encouraged to participate. Art Packs: Check out an…

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Saxophone Choir Concert

December 10 2:30 pm - 4:00 pm

The Sax Choir’s program will freature works by Leroy Anderson, Gustav Holst, and others.

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Selected Shorts

December 10 2:30 pm - 4:30 pm

Holiday Stories is the theme for Selected Shorts at Stanford University, and the nostalgia of the holidays takes center stage. Kirsten Vangsness (Criminal Minds) leads a cast of actors from stage and screen, including Tate Donovan (The Man in the High Castle) and Christina Pickles (Friends, Break a Hip), who will perform tales about returning home, running away, uninvited guests, and unexpected gifts. The program will include stories by Laurie Notaro, Jeanette Winterson, and Kurt Vonnegut.

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Stanford Baroque Soloists: Italy Before Corelli – NEW DATE!

December 11 7:30 pm - 9:00 pm

Anthony Martin directs the Stanford Baroque Soloists’ program, “Italy Before Corelli,” featuring string music mostly from Venice in the 17th century composed by Castello, Marini, Gabrieli, Rossi, Monteverdi, Farina, and Corelli. Note: This event has been rescheduled from the previously announced date of Dec. 9.

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A Chanticleer Christmas

December 13 7:30 pm - 9:30 pm

It wouldn’t be December at Stanford without the annual concert of this beloved a cappella male choir, filling Memorial Church with sound and hearts with joy. Since its 1978 founding in San Francisco by Louis Botto, Chanticleer has toured the world, winning bravos from the capitals of Europe to the greenways of Central Park, where the group has sung alongside the New York Philharmonic. Who knows? Your first visit may launch a family tradition.

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The Klezmatics

December 14 7:30 pm - 9:00 pm

Woody Guthrie and Hanukkah? Who knew? Almost nobody. But in 1998 his daughter Nora discovered a trove of songs that the celebrated folksinger wrote in the 1940s. The Grammy-winning Klezmatics riff off Guthrie’s original melodies and create new tunes in this unremittingly cheerful fusion of Klezmer music and American sounds.

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Annual Messiah Sing / Play Along – NEW DATE!

December 15 7:30 pm - 9:00 pm

This annual “sing and play it yourself” celebration of Handel’s masterwork, conducted by Stephen M. Sano, is a favorite of campus and community! Orchestral parts will be provided, and singers may purchase scores at the door or bring their own.

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An Evening with Brandi Carlile

December 15 7:30 pm - 9:30 pm

The Grammy–nominated singer-songwriter, whose career was launched with the 2007 LP The Story, comes to Stanford with longtime bandmates Tim and Phil Hanseroth (aka “the Twins”) as part of their winter holiday tour. Carlile’s newest album, Cover Stories, celebrates the 10th anniversary of her breakout album with a few notable “heroes and friends” covering her songs: Dolly Parton, Adele, Pearl Jam, the Avett Brothers, and the Indigo Girls, to name a few. Proceeds from the album benefit War Child UK.  OPENING…

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Holiday Organ Recital: Robert Huw Morgan

December 17 1:30 pm - 2:30 pm

Dr. Robert Huw Morgan, university organist, presents his annual holiday recital. 

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Film Screening: Louise Bourgeois: The Spider, the Mistress and the Tangerine

December 28 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm

As an artist, Louise Bourgeois was been at the forefront of successive new developments, but always on her own powerfully inventive and disquieting terms. In 1982, at the age of 71, she became the first woman to be honored with a major retrospective at New York’s Museum of Modern Art. In the decades since, she has created her most powerful and persuasive work that has been exhibited, studied and lectured on worldwide. Filmed with unparalleled access between 1993 and 2007, Louise…

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January 2018

Essays in Sight and Sound

January 12, 2018 12:00 am

This exhibition showcases student works produced in FILMSTUD 50Q – “The Video Essay: Writing with Video about Film and Media” (Fall 2017). These videos explore what it means to “write with video” (rather than text alone) about historical and contemporary audiovisual media. They experiment with a variety of formal, aesthetic, and rhetorical strategies for communicating through video, and they utilize digital editing software as their primary medium through which to construct arguments, analyses, and interpretations of film, television, video games,…

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Talking about a Revolution: Gallery Talk Series

January 13, 2018 12:30 pm - 1:00 pm

Russia’s Crown Reprised   Lascelle Meserve and Nicolas de Basily collected and cherished old Russia and its art. This gallery talk with Edward Kasinec, visiting fellow, Hoover Institution Library & Archives, highlights their gifts to the Hoover Institution Library & Archives that make up part of the institution’s impressive holdings on the Russian Revolution and Imperial Russia. MORE TALKS IN THIS SERIES: OCTOBER 19, 12PM, An Introduction to The Crown under the Hammer: Russia, Romanovs, Revolution with Jodi Roberts, Robert M. and Ruth L. Halperin Curator for Modern…

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NOON CONCERT: Debra Fong, violin, and Lori Lack, piano

January 17, 2018 12:30 pm - 1:30 pm

Department of Music faculty members Debra Fong, violin, and Lori Lack, piano, present a noontime performance of Beethoven’s Sonata No. 9 for Piano and Violin in A Major, Op. 47 (“Kreutzer”).

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Gallery Talk: Rodin: Shock of the Modern Body

January 18, 2018 12:00 pm - 12:30 pm

The MonumentsPlease join Melissa A. Yuen, Curatorial Fellow for American and European Art to 1900, for a discussion about The Burghers of Calais and Monument to Balzac in Rodin: Shock of the Modern Body. At the time of his death, Auguste Rodin (France, 1840-1917) was counted among the most renowned artists in the world. A century later, after numerous reassessments by generations of art historians, Rodin continues to be recognized for making figurative sculpture modern by redefining the expressive capacity of the…

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Becoming Frankenstein: On Risky Aspirations

January 18, 2018 6:00 pm - 7:00 pm

2018 is the 200th anniversary of the publication of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein. This Pegasus Physician Writers reading will be part of the celebration of this event at Stanford called Frankenstein@200 that is being coordinated by Medicine and the Muse. Frankenstein has been called the first new myth since ancient times. We all know the story, but in brief, Shelley relates the story of a young medical student who, after a traumatic loss, decides to take up the ultimate challenge of…

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Claire Messud Reading, part of the Lane Lecture Series

January 22, 2018 8:00 pm - 9:00 pm

Claire Messud is a recipient of Guggenheim and Radcliffe Fellowships and the Strauss Living Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Author of six previous works of fiction including her most recent novel, The Burning Girl, she lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts, with her family.

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Heterogeneous Critique; A Proposal from a Latin American(ist) Point of View

January 26, 2018 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Speaker: Dr. Friedhelm Schmidt-Welle By introducing the concept of “heterogeneous critique”, I propose a theoretical and methodological framework and an alternative to universalist approaches in literary and cultural criticism, approaches which even include the trend to apply Anglo-Saxon postcolonialist positions on Latin American cultures. I will analyze the decline of universalist theory exemplified by the crisis of literary history and the emergence of a new regionalism in Latin American cultural critique which tries to overcome the invisibility of local theoretical…

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A Jewish Musical Journey with Yanky and Shulem Lemmer

January 31, 2018 7:30 pm - 9:00 pm

Jewish Community Federation and Endowment Fund Lecture This concert will be followed by a conversation with Mark L. Kligman, Professor and  Mickey Katz Endowed Chair in Jewish Music in Ethnomusicology and Musicology at UCLA. Mark Kligman specializes in the liturgical traditions of Middle Eastern Jewish communities and various areas of popular Jewish music.  He has published on the liturgical music of Syrian Jews in Brooklyn in journals as well as his book, Maqām and Liturgy: Ritual, Music and Aesthetics of Syrian Jews…

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February 2018

Stanford Engaged Scholarship Conference: (Re)Thinking Engaged Scholarship and Participatory Citizenship

February 1, 2018 10:00 am - 3:00 pm

The 3rd Annual Stanford Engaged Scholarship Conference highlights engaged scholarship and scholar-activism in institutions of higher education and in the community. We define engaged scholarship as diverse research, pedagogy, and creative performance—conducted in partnership with public, non-profit, or private stakeholders—focused on addressing critical social issues and contributing to the public good. This year’s conference theme focuses on the relationships between engaged scholarship and participatory citizenship, while highlighting interdisciplinary and intersectional approaches. Panel presentations will speak to questions and topics of inquiry…

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The Matter of Photography in the Americas

February 7, 2018 11:00 am - 5:00 pm

Featuring artists from twelve different countries, this exhibition presents a wide range of creative responses to photography as an artistic medium and a communicative tool uniquely suited to modern media landscapes and globalized economies. The artists in this exhibition resist the impulse to “document” or “photograph anew” the world immediately around them. Instead, they employ a wide range of materials — from prints and drawings to photocopies and audio installations — to highlight the ways in which photography shapes our…

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NOON CONCERT: Flute Students of Melody Holmes

February 7, 2018 12:30 pm - 1:30 pm

Flute students from Melody Holmes’s studio are featured in this noontime concert. (Program TBA.) 

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St. Olaf College Choir Concert

February 7, 2018 7:30 pm - 9:30 pm

The St. Olaf Choir, with 75 mixed voices, is the premier a cappella choir in the United States. For over a century, the choir has set a standard of choral excellence and remained at the forefront of choral artistry. Conducted since 1990 by Anton Armstrong, the St. Olaf Choir continues to develop the tradition that originated with its founder,F. Melius Christiansen. Since its founding in 1912, the St. Olaf Choir has set a standard in the choral art, serving as…

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Phillip E. Bloom: “Born in the Latter Days of the Dharma: Ecology and Eternity in a Song-Dynasty Buddhist Monastery”

February 8, 2018 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

Abstract: What are the spatial and temporal environments of a Chinese Buddhist monastery? What place does nature hold therein? To answer these questions, this talk will examine Shizhuanshan (Dazu County, Chongqing Municipality), a hilltop sanctuary in southwestern China constructed by a wealthy layman in the late eleventh century. It will argue that at Shizhuanshan, architecture, image, and text work together to transform the natural environment itself into a site for the eternal performance of Buddhist ritual. Bio: Phillip E. Bloom…

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Darlene Love

February 9, 2018 7:30 pm - 9:00 pm

For more than 50 years, singer Darlene Love has been making rock and roll’s world go ‘round. In the early 1960s, she was part of Phil Spector’s Wall of Sound for “He’s a Rebel,” doing backing (as well as uncredited lead) vocals for “Da Doo Ron Ron,” “Be My Baby,” and scores of other hits. With the 2013 documentary Twenty Feet from Stardom, she became the best-known unknown in rock history. Joined for part of the program by the Stanford Symphony…

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Talking about a Revolution: Gallery Talk Series

February 14, 2018 12:00 pm - 12:30 pm

Love & Revolution This Valentine’s Day gallery talk with Samira Bozorgi, assistant archivist for exhibitions, Hoover Institution Library & Archives, focuses on some of the couples who appear in the exhibition including Catherine the Great and Peter III, Nicolas and Lascelle de Basily, and Soviet avant-garde artist couple Valentina Kulagina and Gustav Klutsis. MORE TALKS IN THIS SERIES: OCTOBER 19, 12PM, An Introduction to The Crown under the Hammer: Russia, Romanovs, Revolution with Jodi Roberts, Robert M. and Ruth L. Halperin Curator for Modern and Contemporary…

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Gallery Talk: Rodin: Shock of the Modern Body

February 14, 2018 2:00 pm - 2:30 pm

The MonumentsPlease join Melissa A. Yuen, Curatorial Fellow for American and European Art to 1900, for a discussion about The Gates of Hell in Rodin: Shock of the Modern Body. At the time of his death, Auguste Rodin (France, 1840-1917) was counted among the most renowned artists in the world. A century later, after numerous reassessments by generations of art historians, Rodin continues to be recognized for making figurative sculpture modern by redefining the expressive capacity of the human form. This installation…

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Studio Lecture Series: Manuel Rocha Iturbide

February 15, 2018 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

Sonic Intermidia. The woks of Manuel Rocha Iturbide. In this lecture, the composer and artist Manuel Rocha Iturbide will talk about his different works (composition, sound sculpture and sound installation, conceptual art, graphics, etc) both in the fields of visual art and music, focusing his attention on leading concepts that drive his ideas such as complexity, deconstruction, emptiness and chance, and giving utterance to the different elements that conform a transkdisciplinary work or art, like context, time, space and intermediality…

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Pioneers in Educational Globe-trotting: Stanford Travel/Study at 50

February 20, 2018 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm

Speaker: Brett S. Thompson, Director, Stanford Travel/Study Program

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The Stanford Shakespeare Company Presents: Romeo and Juliet

February 21, 2018 8:00 pm - 10:00 pm

From forth the fatal loins of these two opposéd jazz clubs, the Stanford Shakespeare Company brings back to life this famous tale of star-crossed lovers. At the Blue Note Verona, Romeo and Juliet fall in love at first sight, only to learn that they are mortal enemies. Romeo, abandoning his buddies, jumps the Capulet wall to find Juliet on her balcony, where they exchange proclamations of love and decide to marry. With the help of Friar Laurence and the Nurse,…

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Heather Blair: “What Counts? Buddhism, Picturebooks, and Japanese Culture”

February 22, 2018 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

Abstract: Jokes about hell, fake sutras that, though specious, exert miraculous effects, and stories about a bodhisattva who is as well loved for his failures as for his assistance. These and other playful engagements with Buddhist ideas and imagery pervade picturebooks from Japan’s secular mainstream. But do they count as Buddhist? Focusing on picturebooks published for children from the 1960s to the present, this talk asks what it might mean to be culturally—without necessarily being confessionally—Buddhist. It presents an argument…

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Family Weekend Concert

February 23, 2018 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

Enjoy a free concert and experience the acoustics of Stanford’s state-of-the-art Bing Concert Hall. Learn more about the hall and Stanford Live.

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NOON CONCERT: Harpsichord Studio of Elaine Thornburgh

February 23, 2018 12:30 pm - 1:30 pm

Harpsichord students of Elaine Thornburgh will be featured in this noontime recital. (Program TBA.) 

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Takács Quartet

February 23, 2018 7:30 pm - 9:30 pm

Blessed with a nigh-otherworldly gift for chamber artistry, the Takács Quartet, in the latest of its highly anticipated visits to the Bing, partners with Canadian piano virtuoso MarcAndré Hamelin for the Dohnányi Piano Quintet No. 1. Beethoven’s Opus 131 Quartet and Schubert’s Quartettsatz are also on the program for this Boulder, Colorado–based quartet.

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Bing Concert Hall Tour

February 24, 2018 10:00 am - 11:00 am

Take a behind-the-scenes tour of Bing Concert Hall. Since it opened in January 2013, Bing has transformed the practice, study, and experience of the performing arts on the Stanford campus. Its 842 seats envelope the stage—none of which are farther than 75 feet away—bringing the first row very nearly toe-to-toe with the artists. Bing is a showcase for an array of performance styles—a seamless integration of architecture, acoustics, and technology. It’s no wonder the New York Times called it “the…

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Talking about a Revolution: Gallery Talk Series

February 24, 2018 2:00 pm - 2:30 pm

The Brave New World of Soviet Political Posters  This gallery talk, with Bertrand Patenaude, research fellow, Hoover Institution Library & Archives, highlights how the new Soviet regime pioneered the political propaganda poster and examines recurring themes, symbols, and messages.  MORE TALKS IN THIS SERIES: OCTOBER 19, 12PM, An Introduction to The Crown under the Hammer: Russia, Romanovs, Revolution with Jodi Roberts, Robert M. and Ruth L. Halperin Curator for Modern and Contemporary Art, Cantor Arts Center OCTOBER 21, 1PM, Russia’s Crown under Armand HAMMER!  with Edward…

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Bing Concert Hall Tour

February 24, 2018 2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

Take a behind-the-scenes tour of Bing Concert Hall. Since it opened in January 2013, Bing has transformed the practice, study, and experience of the performing arts on the Stanford campus. Its 842 seats envelope the stage—none of which are farther than 75 feet away—bringing the first row very nearly toe-to-toe with the artists. Bing is a showcase for an array of performance styles—a seamless integration of architecture, acoustics, and technology. It’s no wonder the New York Times called it “the…

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Stanford Philharmonia

February 24, 2018 7:30 pm - 9:30 pm

Lyric for Strings, George Walker’s best-known work, opens this Philharmonia program conducted by Paul Phillips. Walker, now 95 years old, won the Pulitzer Prize in 1996 and is often dubbed the dean of African-American composers. Music for Strings, Percussion, and Celesta, a milestone of 20th-century music by Béla Bartók, follows, and Concerto Competition winner Patrick Worasaran performs Chopin’s Piano Concerto No. 1 to end the program. Program – George Walker: Lyric for Strings– Béla Bartók: Music for Strings, Percussion, and Celesta–…

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Stanford Philharmonia

February 25, 2018 2:30 pm - 4:30 pm

Lyric for Strings, George Walker’s best-known work, opens this Philharmonia program conducted by Paul Phillips. Walker, now 95 years old, won the Pulitzer Prize in 1996 and is often dubbed the dean of African-American composers. Music for Strings, Percussion, and Celesta, a milestone of 20th-century music by Béla Bartók, follows, and Concerto Competition winner Patrick Worasaran performs Chopin’s Piano Concerto No. 1 to end the program. Program – George Walker: Lyric for Strings– Béla Bartók: Music for Strings, Percussion, and Celesta–…

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NOON CONCERT: Flute Students of Greer Ellison

February 28, 2018 12:30 pm - 1:30 pm

Flute students from Greer Ellison’s studio are featured in this noontime concert. (Program TBA.) 

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March 2018

Barbara Rossetti Ambros: “On Talking Terms with Mihotokesama: Material and Bodily Practices of a Jōdo Shin Healer”

March 1, 2018 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

Abstract:  The life story of Takumi Toyoko (b. 1929) illustrates the material and corporeal practices of popular Jōdo Shin in the Hokuriku region. At the intersection between a secret Jōdo Shin confraternity and a healer with an open clientele, Takumi and her devotees challenge stereotypical notions of Jōdo Shin as being opposed to magic and folk traditions. Rather than emphasizing scriptural authority, Takumi communicates directly with the Buddha Amida and wields her own body as a vehicle of salvation. Yet Amida…

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NOON CONCERT: Voice Students of Nova Jiménez

March 2, 2018 12:30 pm - 1:30 pm

Voice students from Nova Jiménez’s studio perform in this noon-time recital. (Program TBA.)

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Talking about a Revolution: Gallery Talk Series

March 3, 2018 12:00 pm - 12:30 pm

Hidden in Plain Sight Learn behind the scenes stories of some of the objects on view in the exhibition with Marissa Schleicher Rhee, project archivist for exhibitions, Hoover Institution Library & Archives. MORE TALKS IN THIS SERIES: OCTOBER 19, 12PM, An Introduction to The Crown under the Hammer: Russia, Romanovs, Revolution with Jodi Roberts, Robert M. and Ruth L. Halperin Curator for Modern and Contemporary Art, Cantor Arts Center OCTOBER 21, 1PM, Russia’s Crown under Armand HAMMER!  with Edward Kasinec, visiting fellow, Hoover Institution Library & Archives  …

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NOON CONCERT: Cello Students of Stephen Harrison

March 7, 2018 12:30 pm - 1:30 pm

Cello students are featured in this noontime concert. (Program TBA.)

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Rev. Shojun Ogi: “Re-Focusing Buddhism in Modern Japanese Society: New Dimensions in Contemporary Japanese Buddhism”

March 8, 2018 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

Abstract: Historically, especially after World War II, Japanese Buddhist temples became focused mainly on conducting funeral rituals, various commemorative memorials, the selling of talismans, and conducting prayer rituals in the name of good fortune, happiness and safety. This led Japanese society, including both Buddhist priests and public at large to come to believe that Buddhism was only relevant regarding death or wishes. However, recognizing the declining position of Buddhism in contemporary Japan, some Buddhist priests have begun creating and implementing…

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NOON CONCERT: Piano Studio of George Barth and Kumaran Arul

March 9, 2018 12:30 pm - 1:30 pm

Piano students of George Barth and Kumaran Arul will be featured in this noontime recital. (Program TBA.) 

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A Conversation with Aimee Bender

March 12, 2018 7:00 pm - 8:30 pm

Aimee Bender is the author of five books: The Girl in the Flammable Skirt (1998) which was a NY Times Notable Book, An Invisible Sign of My Own (2000) which was an L.A. Times pick of the year, Willful Creatures(2005) which was nominated by The Believer as one of the best books of the year, The Particular Sadness of Lemon Cake (2010) which won the SCIBA award for best fiction, and an Alex Award, and The Color Master, a NY Times Notable book for 2013. Her books have been translated…

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April 2018

Health Humanities Consortium Conference

April 20, 2018 12:00 am

A three-day celebration of the 200th anniversary of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein through an exploration of medically-based ethical dilemmas and an examination of the relevance of Frankenstein in moral imagination today.

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James A. Benn: “Controversies in the Doctrine and Practice of Self-immolation in Medieval China”

April 21, 2018 12:00 am

Abstract: In this seminar we will read selected passages from the chapter on self-immolation (sheshen pian 捨身篇) in the seventh-century Chinese Buddhist compendium Fayuan zhulin 法苑珠林. We will see how the compiler of the work—Daoshi 道世 (596?–683) places a range of somatic practices including burning the body within the context of the propagation of Buddhism. We will note how he deploys key jātaka tales and Mahāyāna sutras as scriptural supports for the practice, and reflect on his choice of hagiographical material from China. Bio: James A. Benn…

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Hisham Matar Reading, part of the Lane Lecture Series

April 23, 2018 8:00 pm - 9:00 pm

Photo by Diana Matar Part of the Lane Lecture Series Hisham Matar was born in New York City to Libyan parents, spent his childhood in Tripoli and Cairo, and has lived most of his adult life in London. His critically acclaimed 2016 memoir The Return: Fathers, Sons and the Land in Between won the Pulitzer Prize for Autobiography and received the PEN America Book of the Year Award. In The Return, he recounts his search for his father, who was…

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Sundays with the St. Lawrence

April 29, 2018 2:30 pm - 4:00 pm

Returning to its roots, the St. Lawrence performs music by Canadian composer R. Murray Schafer, in addition to Haydn’s String Quartet in C Major, op. 33, no. 3, and Erich Wolfgang Korngold’s Opus 15 Piano Quintet with longtime collaborator Stephen Prutsman.

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May 2018

Tim H. Barrett: “A Possible Buddhist Influence on Chinese Political Thought”

May 3, 2018 6:00 pm - 7:30 pm

Abstract: Much work has been done in recent decades on the way in which Chinese rulers made use of Buddhism to bolster their power, but in fact some Buddhist ideas concerning kingship found in South Asian materials were quite negative. China was in imperial times an autocracy in which such negativity towards kingship generally did not flourish. But if we look carefully, is there really no trace at all of these Buddhist ideas entering the Chinese tradition of political thought? …

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47th Annual Stanford Powwow and Art Market

May 11, 2018 5:00 pm - 10:00 pm

A celebration of Native American cultures including dance and music with more than 100 artist, food and information booth vendors. Booth vendors will begin opening by 5:00pm and Intertribal and competition dancing continues 7:00pm-11:00pm on Friday, Noon-10:00pm on Saturday, and Noon-6:00pm on Sunday. The 22nd Annual Stanford Powwow Fun Run/Walk will take place at 8:00am on Saturday, May 12.  These outdoor events will continue “rain or shine!”

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47th Annual Stanford Powwow and Art Market

May 12, 2018 10:00 am - 10:00 pm

A celebration of Native American cultures including dance and music with more than 100 artist, food and information booth vendors. Booth vendors will begin opening mid-morning and Intertribal and competition dancing continues 7:00pm-11:00pm on Friday, Noon-10:00pm on Saturday, and Noon-6:00pm on Sunday. The 22nd Annual Stanford Powwow Fun Run/Walk will take place at 8:00am on Saturday, May 12.  These outdoor events will continue “rain or shine!”

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47th Annual Stanford Powwow and Art Market

May 13, 2018 10:00 am - 6:00 pm

A celebration of Native American cultures including dance and music with more than 100 artist, food and information booth vendors. Booth vendors will begin opening by mid-morning and Intertribal and competition dancing continues 7:00pm-10:00pm on Friday, Noon-10:00pm on Saturday, and Noon-6:00pm on Sunday. The 22nd Annual Stanford Powwow Fun Run/Walk will take place at 8:00am on Saturday, May 12.  These outdoor events will continue “rain or shine!”

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NOON CONCERT: Flute Students of Melody Holmes

May 16, 2018 12:30 pm - 1:30 pm

Flute students from Melody Holmes’s studio are featured in this noontime concert. (Program TBA.) 

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Rupert Gethin: “On Death and Rebirth, and What Happens in Between: Two Buddhist Accounts of Why it Matters”

May 17, 2018 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

Abstract: Ancient Indian Buddhist thinkers for the most part took it as given that death was followed by rebirth, but they disagreed on whether death was followed immediately by rebirth or by an in between state (antarābhava). The lecture will consider two accounts of death and rebirth, both from the fourth to fifth centuries CE but representing the traditions of two different schools: (1) the account found in Vasubandhu’s Abhidharmakośa, which presents the traditions of the Sarvāstivāda school and advocates an in between state, and (2) the account found in the…

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NOON CONCERT: Cello Students of Stephen Harrison

May 23, 2018 12:30 pm - 1:30 pm

Cello students are featured in this noontime concert. (Program TBA.)

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Oliver Freiberger: “Lines in Water? On Drawing Buddhism’s Boundaries in Ancient India”

May 24, 2018 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

Abstract: This talk explores the ways in which religious agents – and modern scholars – distinguish religions. Illustrated by examples from ancient India, it will problematize the popular notion of blurred boundaries and suggest a multilayered approach for analyzing religious boundary-making. The paper argues that scholars should be prepared to find, even within one religious community, numerous and possibly conflicting ways of drawing a boundary between “us” and “them.” Bio: Dr. Oliver Freiberger is associate professor of Asian Studies and…

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NOON CONCERT: Flute Students of Greer Ellison

May 30, 2018 12:30 pm - 1:30 pm

Flute students from Greer Ellison’s studio are featured in this noontime concert. (Program TBA.) 

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June 2018

NOON CONCERT: Piano Studio of George Barth and Kumaran Arul

June 1, 2018 12:30 pm - 1:30 pm

Piano students of George Barth and Kumaran Arul will be featured in this noontime recital. (Program TBA.) 

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