Loading Events
Find Events

Event Views Navigation

Upcoming Events › International

Events List Navigation

September 2018

Public Tour: Painting Nature in the American Gilded Age

September 20 12:30 pm - 1:30 pm

Public Tour: Painting Nature in the American Gilded Age Thursday, Saturday, and Sunday at 12:30pm Drawing from the Cantor’s permanent collection, this exhibition considers how nature was depicted by American artists from the 1880s to 1910, an era of unprecedented industrialization and urban development. Through landscapes, portraits, and still lifes, the exhibition highlights the importance of nature for artists and the public, both of whom increasingly were affected by machines, cities, and crowds.

Find out more »

Public Tour: Painting Nature in the American Gilded Age

September 22 12:30 pm - 1:30 pm

Public Tour: Painting Nature in the American Gilded Age Thursday, Saturday, and Sunday at 12:30pm Drawing from the Cantor’s permanent collection, this exhibition considers how nature was depicted by American artists from the 1880s to 1910, an era of unprecedented industrialization and urban development. Through landscapes, portraits, and still lifes, the exhibition highlights the importance of nature for artists and the public, both of whom increasingly were affected by machines, cities, and crowds.

Find out more »

Public Tour: Painting Nature in the American Gilded Age

September 23 12:30 pm - 1:30 pm

Public Tour: Painting Nature in the American Gilded Age Thursday, Saturday, and Sunday at 12:30pm Drawing from the Cantor’s permanent collection, this exhibition considers how nature was depicted by American artists from the 1880s to 1910, an era of unprecedented industrialization and urban development. Through landscapes, portraits, and still lifes, the exhibition highlights the importance of nature for artists and the public, both of whom increasingly were affected by machines, cities, and crowds.

Find out more »

Cien Años de Alegría: Celebrating Fernando Alegría’s Centennial

September 26 4:00 pm - 7:00 pm

Fernando Alegría (1918-2005), Stanford Professor of Latin American Literature, award-winning novelist, poet, and literary critic, spent much of his life away from his native Chile, living and teaching in the United States. Special screening of Viva Chile M…! The film follows Alegria’s life through his poetry,with testimonials from those who knew him best. Followed by Q & A with the film producer Marcia Campos Free and open to the public but MUST reserve HERE.

Find out more »

Contact Warhol: Photography Without End

September 29 11:00 am - 5:00 pm

See the first public display of images from the Cantor’s remarkable archive of Andy Warhol’s photographic contact sheets, along with other examples of the artist’s iconic work. This exhibition and accompanying catalogue are organized by the Cantor Arts Center. We gratefully acknowledge support from The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts and the Office of the President, Stanford University. Please be advised that some images in this exhibition may not be appropriate for young viewers. IMAGE: Andy Warhol (U.S.A.,…

Find out more »
October 2018

“The Book of Ruth and the Question of Migration: From S.Y. Agnon to Adi Nes” with Ilana Pardes

October 9 5:30 pm

Ilana Pardes is the Katharine Cornell Professor of Comparative Literature at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and the Director of the Center for Literary Studies. Her work has focused on the nexus of Bible, literature, and culture as well as on questions of aesthetics and hermeneutics. She is the author of Countertraditions in the Bible: A Feminist Approach (Harvard University Press, 1992), The Biography of Ancient Israel: National Narratives in the Bible (University of California Press, 2000), Melville’s Bibles (University…

Find out more »

Kickstart Your Social Impact Career

October 9 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm

Kickstart Your Social Impact Career / October 9, 2018 / 6:00 – 8:00 P.M. A Cardinal Careers Event Come and learn how to turn your interests into social impact into a job after you graduate!  Meet with leaders from a wide spectrum of social impact organizations to get first-hand insight into their career paths, their organization’s work and their fields more generally.  Come away with strategies and contacts for your job search.  (This is NOT a jobs/recruiting fair.) 6:00 – 8:00 PM   Career conversations with…

Find out more »

Film Screening of “The Shepherdess of the Glaciers” with Discussion by Filmmaker, Stanzin Dorjai Gya

October 9 7:30 pm - 9:30 pm

The Shepherdess of the Glaciers (La Bergère des Glaces) 2015, Stanzin Dorjai and Christiane Mordelet India/France, 74 min, (English subtitles)  On a rock-strewn mountain in the Himalayan region of Ladakh, lives shepherdess Tsering. Her flock of 250 sheep and cashmere goats are her only companions, except for the troubling presence of wolves and a snow leopard; her only link to the outside world is a small transistor radio. This documentary presents an intimate portrait of a disappearing way of life –…

Find out more »

Exhibit Reception – “East Asia at Hoover” & “Hand and Eye”

October 10 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

Please RSVP here. Join us for a reception to celebrate two exhibits and two anniversaries.  The reception will begin at Hoover Tower with a viewing of the “East Asia at Hoover: Collections of War, Revolution, & Peace” exhibit, in celebration of Hoover Institution’s 100th anniversary this year.  Then we will walk to the East Asia Library (approximately 5-7 minutes) to view the “Hand and Eye: Contemporary Reflections of East Asian Ceramic Traditions” exhibit, in celebration of the Center for East Asian…

Find out more »

Book Talk: With Open Eyes

October 11 6:30 pm - 8:00 pm

Zakaria Hashemi is an acclaimed director, novelist, documentary filmmaker for television, and the lead actor in Ebrahim Golestan’s “Brick and Mirror.” He discusses his book With Open Eyes (2004), a memoir-like novel describing his experiences as a filmmaker intimately involved in the Iran-Iraq war. Hashemi was discovered by Farough Farrokzad and introduced to Mr. Golestan; their collaboration has continued for the last half century.  Event is in Farsi.  To find out more about Iranian Studies events please join our mailing…

Find out more »

Lecture: Blackboard

October 11 7:00 pm - 8:00 pm

Curator Yinshi Lerman-Tan, PhD candidate in the Department of Art and Art History, speaks about the exhibition Blackboard, which brings together works that imitate, resemble, or feature a blackboard, to consider the relationship between art and education. The “blackboards” on view interrogate schooling, authority, literacy, form, and color. Blackboard will be a part of the 50 State Initiative organized by For Freedoms, a platform for artists and museums to encourage civic engagement. IMAGE: Claes Oldenburg (U.S.A., b. Sweden, b. 1929), M.…

Find out more »

Book Talk: Moon Brow

October 16 6:30 pm - 8:00 pm

Shahriar Mandanipour discusses his new book Moon Brow, about a young soldier who reemerges from the Iran-Iraq war missing a limb and most of his memory. He is haunted by the vision of a mysterious woman whose face he cannot see. Shahriar Mandanipour is one of the most accomplished writers of contemporary Iranian literature, the author of nine volumes of fiction, one nonfiction book, and more than 100 essays in literary theory, literature and art criticism, creative writing, censorship, and…

Find out more »

Halting Exchange: The Travel Ban’s Cultural Effects

October 18 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm

Inspired by the Kronos Quartet’s performance Music For Change: The Banned Countries, Stanford Live is partnering with the Hamid and Christina Moghadam Program in Iranian Studies to bring together artists and Stanford foreign relations experts to discuss the impacts of the 2017 Executive Orders that limit travel from Muslim-majority countries to the US. How are these orders affecting the institutions that provide much needed cross-cultural exchange and understanding—from higher education to formal diplomacy—and how do we move forward? Professor Abbas Milani (Director, Iranian Studies) will lead the panel…

Find out more »

Curator Talk: Queer Warhol

October 21 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

The program examines Andy Warhol’s wide-ranging participation in the gay culture of the 1970s, from photographs of drag queens to sexually explicit imagery. A presentation by exhibition co-curator Richard Meyer, Robert and Ruth Halperin Professor in Art History, will be followed by spotlight tours in the galleries. In the exhibition Contact Warhol, see the first public display of images from the Cantor’s remarkable archive of Andy Warhol’s photographic contact sheets, along with other examples of the artist’s iconic work. This…

Find out more »

Populist Challenges to Democracy

October 23 5:30 pm - 6:45 pm

How do populism and nationalism challenge democracy? Can they instead help to sustain it? This panel explores the causes of the global populist upsurge, from popular discontent to economic shocks. Nationalism and populism are powerful, compatible, and resonant ideologies. As a result, they can legitimate leaders and mobilize citizens – and pose dramatic challenges to liberal democracy.  This is the first of three public symposia during the 2018-19 academic year to be hosted by the Center for Advanced Study in…

Find out more »

Hadi and His Alam

October 25 6:30 pm - 8:00 pm

Hadi Khorsandi is a UK-based, exiled Iranian satirist and poet. He published “Asghar Agha” weekly for 30 years. He is the recipient of several awards and continues to perform comedy shows in Europe and the US. His new book The Fake Diaries of Alam is a spoof on The Diaries of Alam, one of the best-selling Iranian books in recent years by the powerful court minister Asadollah Alam about his relationship with the Shah. Khorsandi will read excerpts from the…

Find out more »

Gallery Talk Series: Painting Nature in the American Gilded Age

October 26 12:30 pm - 1:00 pm

Curator Melissa Yuen, curatorial fellow for American and European art to 1900, discusses the exhibition, which considers how nature was depicted by American artists from the 1880s to 1910, an era of unprecedented industrialization and urban development. Through landscapes, portraits, and still lifes, the exhibition highlights the importance of nature for artists and the public, both of whom increasingly were affected by machines, cities, and crowds. TALKS IN THIS SERIES: Friday, September 14, 12:30 PMFriday, October 26, 12:30 PM IMAGE: William…

Find out more »
November 2018

Eric Huntington: “On Buddhist Images: Materiality and Constructedness in Religious Representations”

November 1 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

Abstract: Common to many Buddhist images is a purported activity of representation—of directing a viewer toward a subject other than the materials and conformation of the object itself, for example the no-longer-accessible human Buddha of the distant past. Such representational activity is often approached through theories of semiotics or cognitive and affective response, with special emphasis also being placed on the rituals of consecration in which the manufactured image is understood to become, in some ways, the subject it depicts. This presentation looks earlier into the…

Find out more »

Emily Greenwood (Yale), “Troubling the Classical Commonplace: Reading Ancient Athenian Legal Speeches After Frederick Douglass”

November 2 5:30 pm - 7:30 pm

This lecture will explore the relationship between narration, subjecthood, embodiment, and identity in extant Athenian legal oratory in dialogue with the writings and speeches of Frederick Douglass and subsequent African American thought, opening up critical questions about the role of readers and audiences in shaping the Classics that we read. Emily Greenwood is Professor of Classics and Chair of the Department of Classics at Yale University. Her research focuses on Ancient Greek Historiography (Herodotus and Thucydides) and the complex dialogue…

Find out more »

When and Where was Hindustan?

November 29 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Manan Ahmed, Associate Professor, is interested in the relationship between text, space and narrative. His areas of specialization include Muslim intellectual history in South and Southeast Asia; critical philosophy of history, early modern and modern South Asia. His first monograph, A Book of Conquest: The Chachnama and Muslim Origins in South Asia (Harvard University Press, 2016) is an intellectual history of a text— the early thirteenth century Persian history called Chachnama— and a place— the medieval city of Uch Sharif…

Find out more »

The Next Revolution Will be Led by Women

November 29 6:30 pm - 8:00 pm

Masih Alinejad is an Iranian journalist, women’s rights activist, TV host of Tablet satirical news program and author of the memoir The Wind in My Hair. In 2014, Alinejad launched the “My Stealthy Freedom” campaign, one of the many such efforts inside and outside Iran against the oppression of women in the Islamic Republic. She discusses her memoir and her experience in this movement.   The Stanford Bookstore will have copies of The Wind in My Hair available for purchase…

Find out more »

Gallery Talk: Contact Warhol: Photography Without End

November 30 12:30 pm - 1:00 pm

Lexi Johnson and Jon Davies, PhD candidates in the Department of Art and Art History, will lead a gallery talk through the exhibition Contact Warhol. See the first public display of images from the Cantor’s remarkable archive of Andy Warhol’s photographic contact sheets, along with other examples of the artist’s iconic work. This exhibition and accompanying catalogue are organized by the Cantor Arts Center. We gratefully acknowledge support from The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts and the Office of…

Find out more »
February 2019

Wooden Fish Ensemble – NEW DATE!

February 9, 2019 2:30 pm - 4:00 pm

Wooden Fish Ensemble performs works by Hyo-shin Na along with Japanese and Korean folk songs. | This event was rescheduled from Feb. 8 at 7:30 p.m.

Find out more »
April 2019

Venerable Tathālokā: “Powerful Challenges, Powerful Rewards Women Awakening Via the Renunciant Path in 21st Century Buddhism”

April 11, 2019 6:00 pm - 7:30 pm

Abstract: What was the Buddha’s unique and successful Middle Way vision of nekkhamma—“renunciation” which led to his goal of liberation? And why are an increasing number of 21st century women freely choosing such a renunciate path, aspiring to and entering Buddhist monastic life—and ordaining as bhikkhunīs—in light of all obstacles and hurdles, even with no traditional religious, social or family compulsion to do so? Ayyā Tathālokā will speak of the challenges, the rewards, and the surprising insights revealed in  thirty years of monastic life, as founding teacher of the first Theravāda Buddhist bhikkhunīs…

Find out more »

Michael Radich: “The Mahāparinirvāṇa-mahāsūtra in the Religion of Sixth-Century China, as Glimpsed through ‘Sengchou’s’ Cave at Xiaonanhai”

April 18, 2019 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

Abstract: The Mahāparinirvāṇa-mahāsūtra (particularly in the version entitled Da banniepan jing 大般涅槃經 T374, translated by Dharmakṣema ca. 421-432) was one of the significant texts in fifth- and sixth-century Chinese Buddhism, and had a tremendous impact on the formation of distinctive currents in Chinese and East Asian Buddhism over a much longer term. However, too little is still known about the way the text was received, and the way it figured in the religious life of Chinese Buddhists during this period.…

Find out more »
+ Export Listed Events