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September 2017

Film Screening: “Reza Abdoh: Theatre Visionary”

September 28 6:30 pm - 8:30 pm

Directed by Adam Soch, Reza Abdoh: Theatre Visionary (2015, 104 minutes) covers the extraordinary life of Iranian-born American theatrical maverick Reza Abdoh (1963-1995). Soch is an award-winning filmmaker and producer. Throughout the 1990s, he collaborated closely with Reza Abdoh on many of his most acclaimed productions, including Hip-Hop Waltz of Eurydice, Bogeyman, Tight Right White, and Quotations from a Ruined City. In many ways, Reza Abdoh resembles the seminal Romantic composer Franz Schubert. Both of these prodigiously talented artists reflected in…

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October 2017

Reiko Ohnuma: “When Animals Speak: Speaking Animals in the Pāli Jātakas”

October 5 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

Abstract: The Pali Jātaka collection contains many stories that might be described as “animal fables,” featuring highly anthropomorphized animal characters who think, speak, plan, and reason, much in the manner of human beings. Their use of human language and the fact that they speak, not only to each other but also (in many cases) to the human beings they encounter, sharply distinguishes them not only from the more naturalistic animals depicted elsewhere in Buddhist literature, but also from the Buddhist doctrinal…

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Shahnameh and its Oral Traditions

October 5 6:30 pm - 8:30 pm

Jalil Doostkhah is an eminent scholar of Iranian literature and culture, with an abiding interest in the country’s grand epic, Shahnameh. He has published extensively on different aspects of the country’s ancient culture and religion as well as on the textual history and meaning of Shahnameh. He will be discussing his research on some of the oral sources of Shahnameh as well as the role of the rich tradition of ritualized recitation of the text, or Naggali, in its preservation…

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Workforce & Learning Pathways In A Period Of Dynamic Change

October 6 8:30 am - 5:30 pm

The pipelines for highly skilled talent are global. Around the world, organizations compete aggressively to recruit the best and the brightest minds to invent a digital transformation. There is a shortage of highly skilled talent for the digital transformation. Older workers are now falling out of the workforce because they lack means to upgrade to the digital mindset and technologies. The pipeline of young STEM-savvy talent is not sufficient. Access to global talent, once a panacea for Silicon Valley and…

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Graduate Students Workshop: “Buddhist Theories of Embodiment”

October 7 9:00 am - 4:00 pm

Graduate Students Workshop: “Foul Wombs, Lacquered Devices, and the Ancient Tampon: Reading (Critically) for Female Agency in Indian Buddhist Texts” Abstract: Scholarly literature on the female body in Indian Buddhism has focused on the extreme negativity of its representations and usually posited its bad effects on women.  Vinaya scholarship on Buddhist monasticism has emphasized its paternalism, assuming the creation and implementation of vinaya to be elite, androcentric, and rigidly hierarchical. This paper reconsiders the question of the agentive female in…

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Design Your Social Impact Career

October 9 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm

Learn how to turn your interests in social impact into a job after you graduate!  Meet with leaders from over 50 social impact organizations to get first-hand insight into their career paths, their organization’s work, and their fields more broadly. Come away with strategies and contacts for your job search. While some organizations may be recruiting now or later in the year, note that this is not a jobs/recruiting fair.

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Ajahn Jayanto: “A Call of the Heart: A Monk’s Life Today”

October 17 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

Abstract: Ajahn Jayanto will offer reflections on his life as a Theravada Buddhist monk in England, Thailand, and the U.S., and why the ancient Buddhist monastic vocation has become meaningful to increasing numbers of people in our modern societies. Bio: Ajahn Jayanto was born in Boston in 1967. During his university years a period of world travel kindled a great interest in the spiritual life. In 1989 he joined the monastic community of Ajahn Chah and Ajahn Sumedho at Amaravati…

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The Buddha’s Word @ Stanford

October 18 11:00 am - 5:00 pm

This exhibition showcases Buddhist manuscripts and prints held at the Cantor and in Stanford libraries, ranging in dates from around the 11th century to the early 20th century, and coming from various parts of the traditional Buddhist world, from Sri Lanka to Japan. The Buddha’s Word highlights the written word not simply as the visual counterpart to speech but as a thing of beauty and sacredness in and of itself. IMAGE: Artist unknown (Nepal, 12th C.), Pages from a Manuscript of…

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The Crown under the Hammer: Russia, Romanovs, Revolution

October 18 11:00 am - 5:00 pm

Ruth Levison Halperin Gallery, Lynn Krywick Gibbons Gallery at the Cantor Arts Center and the Herbert Hoover Memorial Exhibit Pavilion Marking the centenary of the Russian Revolution of 1917 this exhibition examines the political, social, and cultural upheavals that transformed Russia in the final decades of the Romanov dynasty and the first years of Soviet Communism. Jointly organized by the Hoover Institution Library & Archives and the Cantor Arts Center, this dual-site exhibition features a wide variety of art objects and…

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Earthly Hollows: Cave and Kiln Transformations

October 18 11:00 am - 5:00 pm

This exhibition presents a focused look at caves and kilns, aka “earthly hollows,” as symbolic and physical passages of transformation. Drawing from Cantor’s rich collection of Chinese, Japanese, and Korean art, Earthly Hollows: Cave and Kiln Transformations examines the dynamic ways in which caves, be they mountain grottoes or kilns, tunnel-like chambers made of earth and clay, interface mundane and mystical realms. This exhibition presents a focused look at caves and kilns, aka “earthly hollows,” as symbolic and physical passages of…

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Launch Your Social Impact Career with a Post-Graduate Fellowship (Info Session #1)

October 18 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm

Attention Seniors! Passionate about serving in the public interest? Don’t have plans for next year? Explore our post-graduate fellowships: funded full-time opportunities to work with a mentor in a public mission-driven organization of your choosing. Come to our informational session to learn about former Fellows’ experiences and get insider tips on the application process.

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Anti-Clericalism in Medieval Persian Poetry

October 19 6:30 pm - 8:30 pm

Dr. Leonard Lewisohn is Senior Lecturer in Persian and Iran Heritage Foundation Fellow at the Institute of Arab and Islamic Studies of the University of Exeter where he teaches Islamic Studies, Sufism, history of Iran, as well as courses on Persian texts and Persian poetry in translation. He specializes in translation of Persian Sufi poetic and prose texts. He has authored many books including Beyond Faith and Infidelity: The Sufi Poetry and Teachings of Mahmud Shabistari (London: Curzon Press 1995), and…

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The Russian Revolution Comes to Stanford: Alexander Kerensky on Campus

October 26 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm

Speaker: Bertrand M. Patenaude, Research Fellow, Hoover Institution Alexander Kerensky was the charismatic leader of the Provisional Government that held a tenuous grip on power in Russia between the fall of the Romanovs in February 1917 and the storming to power of the Bolsheviks in the October Revolution. Kerensky first visited Stanford in 1955 and spent much of the next ten years on campus, conducting research in the Hoover Library & Archives, teaching seminars, giving guest lectures, and appearing on…

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Launch Your Social Impact Career with a Post-Graduate Fellowship (Info Session #2)

October 26 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm

Attention Seniors! Passionate about serving in the public interest? Don’t have plans for next year? Explore our post-graduate fellowships: funded full-time opportunities to work with a mentor in a public mission-driven organization of your choosing. Come to our informational session to learn about former Fellows’ experiences and get insider tips on the application process.

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Gallery Talk: In Dialogue: African Arts

October 26 6:00 pm - 6:30 pm

Amanda M. Maples, Curatorial Fellow for African and Indigenous American Art, discusses In Dialogue: African Arts. In Dialogue represents the vibrant and dynamic arts of the continent and its diasporas. Drawing primarily from the Cantor’s own collection, it considers the arts of Africa to be rooted in a deep and rich history that is locally, as much as globally, connected. The exhibition will prompt the viewer, both new to and familiar with African arts, to wonder — who, where, when, why and even…

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Launch Your Social Impact Career with a Post-Graduate Fellowship (Info Session #3)

October 30 7:30 pm - 8:30 pm

Attention Seniors! Passionate about serving in the public interest? Don’t have plans for next year? Explore our post-graduate fellowships: funded full-time opportunities to work with a mentor in a public mission-driven organization of your choosing. Come to our informational session to learn about former Fellows’ experiences and get insider tips on the application process.

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November 2017

About Face: Intimacy and Abstraction in Photographic Portraits

November 1 11:00 am - 5:00 pm

This exhibition considers the voyeuristic intimacy of the close-up portrait in thirteen photographs by celebrated photographers Ansel Adams, Imogen Cunningham, John Gutmann, Barbara Morgan, and Edward Weston. Dating from the 1920s to the early 1940s, each striking photograph captures a likeness and the mood set by the subject’s personality. Taken in close proximity  or  cropped  in the darkroom,  they present  their  subjects  in great detail but also allow passages of abstraction  to emerge from  the  clean  geometry of  the compositions.IMAGE:…

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In Search of Miki: Hayakawa, a “Forgotten” American/Japanese/Woman Artist in Pre-WWII California | ShiPu Wang

November 1 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

THE OTHER AMERICAN MODERNS: Matsura, Ishigaki, Noda Hayakawa ShiPu Wang, Associate Professor of Art History at the University of California, Merced, recounts his circuitous pursuit of the “lost” paintings of Hayakawa (ミキ早川, 1899-1953), a critically-acclaimed California artist who is largely unknown today. Through piecing together scattered details of Hayakawa’s enigmatic life, Wang recovers an Exclusion-era history of a vibrant, multi-racial/cultural artistic community in which the artist and her compatriots defiantly thrived. This talk is drawn from Wang’s new book, The…

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Whose city? Reclaiming public space as a step towards municipal approach to politics in Belgrade

November 2 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

Photographer Luka Knežević-Strika will deliver a lecture on the topic: “Whose city? Reclaiming public space as a step towards municipal approach to politics in Belgrade.” More details to be announced.

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Jenny Q Chai

November 2 7:30 pm - 9:00 pm

Please join us for an evening of multimedia works for piano, electronics, and video with Jenny Q Chai. An artist of singular vision, pianist Jenny Q Chai is widely renowned for her ability to illuminate musical connections throughout the centuries. With radical joie de vivre and razor-sharp intention, Chai creates layered multimedia programs and events which explore and unite elements of science, nature, fashion, and art. “Jenny Q Chai, who has studied with Pierre-Laurent Aimard, is following the more eclectic path…” – New…

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CBD 2017: Tea Ceremony: An experiential contemplative practice

November 5 2:30 pm - 4:30 pm

Enjoy the tranquility of the tea-brewing process and appreciate the history of Chinese tea ceremonies in this culturally rooted contemplative practice. Attendees will learn about the origins and related cultural activities of the Chinese tea ceremony, then participate in a ceremony themselves alongside a host. Learn how the simple act of making tea can become an experience of shared presence, relaxation, and honoring of tradition. The ceremony will also feature a contemplative performance from the Stanford Chinese Music Ensemble. Chairs…

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Gallery Talk: In Dialogue: African Arts

November 8 2:00 pm - 2:30 pm

Amanda M. Maples, Curatorial Fellow for African and Indigenous American Art, discusses In Dialogue: African Arts. In Dialogue represents the vibrant and dynamic arts of the continent and its diasporas. Drawing primarily from the Cantor’s own collection, it considers the arts of Africa to be rooted in a deep and rich history that is locally, as much as globally, connected. The exhibition will prompt the viewer, both new to and familiar with African arts, to wonder — who, where, when, why and even…

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“Daihannya Tendoku-e” Performed by Karyōbinga Shōmyō Kenkyūkai

November 10 7:00 pm - 8:30 pm

Kashōken, an internationally renowned ensemble of Japanese Shingon priests, will perform a Daihannya Tendoku, a “rolling reading” of the Great Sutra on the Perfection of Wisdom (Mahāprajñāpāramitā sūtra) at the Memorial Church of Stanford University. The Daihannya Tendoku is one of the most important rituals of Japanese Buddhism. It features the Great Sutra on the Perfection of Wisdom, one of the central texts of Mahayana Buddhism, and with 600 fascicles also the longest text in the Buddhist canon. Since the…

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Ani Choying Drolma: “Buddhist Chants and Songs”

November 11 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm

Choying Drolma was born in Kathmandu, Nepal to Tibetan refugee parents in 1971. Her education and spiritual training were supervised by the renowned meditation master, Tulku Urgyen Rinpoche. She was well-trained in Buddhist meditation, chants, rituals and ceremonies performance, and was quickly advanced to the position of chanting master in the nunnery. Her singing talent was first discovered by the famous American guitarist Steve Tibbetts, during his visit to Nagi Gompa. Thanks to Steve Tibbett’s effort, Ani Choying Drolma’s first…

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The Age of Irreverence: A New History of Laughter in China

November 13 4:30 pm - 5:30 pm

This event is for current Stanford students and faculty only. About the talk: China’s entry in to modernity was not just traumatic, but uproarious. As the Qing last dynasty fell, prominent writers compiled jokes to form collections called “histories of laughter.” In the first years of the republic, novelists, essayists, and illustrators used humorous allegories to make veiled critiques of the new government. Yet political and cultural discussion repeatedly erupted into invective, with critics gleefully jeering rivals in public. Farceurs…

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Building a Shared Urban Future: From Creative Democracy to Participatory Planning

November 13 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

With the growing changes in cities across the world, citizens are demanding and expecting new ways of engaging with their urban environments. This special evening panel will bring together interdisciplinary perspectives from design, public policy, and the arts to explore theories and framing of citizen participation and new possibilities for engaging the urban populace at large. From topics of creative democracy in public policy, participatory planning in public housing, to maker activities in public spaces, how might we build a…

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World of Thieves: A Global History of the Chinese Swindle Story

November 14 4:30 pm - 6:00 pm

Please RSVP here.  Free and open to the public. About the talk: Why do collections of swindle stories appear at certain times and places? In China, for example, the swindle story has experienced bursts of popularity during the late Ming, the early Republican era, the early Mao era, and during the last 20 years. And comparable works exist around the world. What, for example, do Zhang Yingyu’s Book of Swindles (Ming China, 1617), Richard King’s The New Cheats of London…

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Launch Your Social Impact Career with a Post-Graduate Fellowship (Info Session #4)

November 14 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm

Attention Seniors! Passionate about serving in the public interest? Don’t have plans for next year? Explore our post-graduate fellowships: funded full-time opportunities to work with a mentor in a public mission-driven organization of your choosing. Come to our informational session to learn about former Fellows’ experiences and get insider tips on the application process.

Find out more »

Gallery Talk: In Dialogue: African Arts

November 15 12:00 pm - 12:30 pm

Amanda M. Maples, Curatorial Fellow for African and Indigenous American Art, discusses Uwa by El Anatsui. In Dialogue represents the vibrant and dynamic arts of the continent and its diasporas. Drawing primarily from the Cantor’s own collection, it considers the arts of Africa to be rooted in a deep and rich history that is locally, as much as globally, connected. The exhibition will prompt the viewer, both new to and familiar with African arts, to wonder — who, where, when, why and even what is…

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Serve a Year, Fulfill a Mission: Service Year Programs

November 16 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Interested in education, the environment, disaster relief, health care, or any other imaginable pressing world issue? Consider taking a service year to help leading organizations achieve their missions. Service Year Alliance CEO Shirley Sagawa, along with representatives from a variety of service year programs, will share opportunities to spend a year doing meaningful work alongside diverse, driven people. CREAM will be served to those who RSVP.

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How to Write Epic Fellowship Applications (Workshop #1)

November 28 5:30 pm - 6:30 pm

Join Hume Writing Center staff at the Haas Center for an evening of brainstorming and essay drafting. A great cure for writer’s block, this workshop will help you develop pages of ideas, a new set of writing tools, and the redefined focus and perspective you need to write a personal statement and essays for Post-Graduate Fellowship and Cardinal Quarter applications.

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Séverine Ballon, cello: Works for cello and multichannel electronics

November 29 7:30 pm - 9:00 pm

Séverine Ballon‘s work focuses on regular performance of key works of the cello repertoire, as well as numerous collaborations with composers; in addition, her researches as an improviser have helped her to extend the sonic and technical resources of her instrument. She studied the cello at the Hochschule für Musik in Berlin and in Lübeck with Joseph Schwab and Troels Svane. During 2004-05, she was an academist at the Ensemble Modern (Internationale Ensemble Modern Akademie). She perfected her contemporary cello…

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December 2017

Face/Interface: Type Design and Human-Computer Interaction Beyond the Western World

December 1 9:00 am - 5:30 pm

In connection with the 2017-18 Stanford University Libraries exhibition, “Facing the World: Type Design in Global Perspective,” this international conference brings together scholars, designers, engineers, and technologists to explore Non-Latin type design, book design, interface design, and human-computer interaction beyond the Latin alphabetic world. CONFIRMED SPEAKERS Aaron BellBruce RosenblumC. Ryan PerkinsChuck BigelowCraig EliasonFiona RossGerry LeonidasJo De BaerdemaekerJohn BerryJohn HudsonJuan BruceKen LundeKris HolmesLara CaptanLiron Lavi TurkenichLiu ZhaoNeil PatelNeil TrujilloRamsey NasserScott KlemmerThomas Huot-MarchandThomas S. MullaneyZachary Scheuren REGISTRATION LINK: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/faceinterface-type-design-and-hci-beyond-the-western-world-tickets-37745774628

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How to Write Epic Fellowship Applications (Workshop #2)

December 4 5:30 pm - 6:30 pm

Join Hume Writing Center staff at the Haas Center for an evening of brainstorming and essay drafting. A great cure for writer’s block, this workshop will help you develop pages of ideas, a new set of writing tools, and the redefined focus and perspective you need to write a personal statement and essays for Post-Graduate Fellowship and Cardinal Quarter applications.

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A Bridge Taken for a Wall, a Wall Taken for a Bridge: On Persian Art, Poetry, and Translation

December 7 6:30 pm - 8:30 pm

Jahan Ramazani is University Professor and Edgar F. Shannon Professor of English at the University of Virginia. He is currently writing a book on poetry in a global age. This talk on poetry, art, and East-West translation ranges from ancient Iran to medieval Byzantium and the Abbasid era to modern Iran and Ireland. The lecture is in three parts. The first looks at the Persian artistic influences via Byzantium on a modern Irish poet that have passed largely unrecognized (a bridge…

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January 2018

Heterogeneous Critique; A Proposal from a Latin American(ist) Point of View

January 26, 2018 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Speaker: Dr. Friedhelm Schmidt-Welle By introducing the concept of “heterogeneous critique”, I propose a theoretical and methodological framework and an alternative to universalist approaches in literary and cultural criticism, approaches which even include the trend to apply Anglo-Saxon postcolonialist positions on Latin American cultures. I will analyze the decline of universalist theory exemplified by the crisis of literary history and the emergence of a new regionalism in Latin American cultural critique which tries to overcome the invisibility of local theoretical…

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February 2018

The Matter of Photography in the Americas

February 7, 2018 11:00 am - 5:00 pm

Featuring artists from twelve different countries, this exhibition presents a wide range of creative responses to photography as an artistic medium and a communicative tool uniquely suited to modern media landscapes and globalized economies. The artists in this exhibition resist the impulse to “document” or “photograph anew” the world immediately around them. Instead, they employ a wide range of materials — from prints and drawings to photocopies and audio installations — to highlight the ways in which photography shapes our…

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Phillip E. Bloom: “Born in the Latter Days of the Dharma: Ecology and Eternity in a Song-Dynasty Buddhist Monastery”

February 8, 2018 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

Abstract: What are the spatial and temporal environments of a Chinese Buddhist monastery? What place does nature hold therein? To answer these questions, this talk will examine Shizhuanshan (Dazu County, Chongqing Municipality), a hilltop sanctuary in southwestern China constructed by a wealthy layman in the late eleventh century. It will argue that at Shizhuanshan, architecture, image, and text work together to transform the natural environment itself into a site for the eternal performance of Buddhist ritual. Bio: Phillip E. Bloom…

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Pioneers in Educational Globe-trotting: Stanford Travel/Study at 50

February 20, 2018 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm

Speaker: Brett S. Thompson, Director, Stanford Travel/Study Program

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Heather Blair: “What Counts? Buddhism, Picturebooks, and Japanese Culture”

February 22, 2018 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

Abstract: Jokes about hell, fake sutras that, though specious, exert miraculous effects, and stories about a bodhisattva who is as well loved for his failures as for his assistance. These and other playful engagements with Buddhist ideas and imagery pervade picturebooks from Japan’s secular mainstream. But do they count as Buddhist? Focusing on picturebooks published for children from the 1960s to the present, this talk asks what it might mean to be culturally—without necessarily being confessionally—Buddhist. It presents an argument…

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March 2018

Barbara Rossetti Ambros: “On Talking Terms with Mihotokesama: Material and Bodily Practices of a Jōdo Shin Healer”

March 1, 2018 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

Abstract:  The life story of Takumi Toyoko (b. 1929) illustrates the material and corporeal practices of popular Jōdo Shin in the Hokuriku region. At the intersection between a secret Jōdo Shin confraternity and a healer with an open clientele, Takumi and her devotees challenge stereotypical notions of Jōdo Shin as being opposed to magic and folk traditions. Rather than emphasizing scriptural authority, Takumi communicates directly with the Buddha Amida and wields her own body as a vehicle of salvation. Yet Amida…

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Rev. Shojun Ogi: “Re-Focusing Buddhism in Modern Japanese Society: New Dimensions in Contemporary Japanese Buddhism”

March 8, 2018 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

Abstract: Historically, especially after World War II, Japanese Buddhist temples became focused mainly on conducting funeral rituals, various commemorative memorials, the selling of talismans, and conducting prayer rituals in the name of good fortune, happiness and safety. This led Japanese society, including both Buddhist priests and public at large to come to believe that Buddhism was only relevant regarding death or wishes. However, recognizing the declining position of Buddhism in contemporary Japan, some Buddhist priests have begun creating and implementing…

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April 2018

James A. Benn: “Controversies in the Doctrine and Practice of Self-immolation in Medieval China”

April 21, 2018 12:00 am

Abstract: In this seminar we will read selected passages from the chapter on self-immolation (sheshen pian 捨身篇) in the seventh-century Chinese Buddhist compendium Fayuan zhulin 法苑珠林. We will see how the compiler of the work—Daoshi 道世 (596?–683) places a range of somatic practices including burning the body within the context of the propagation of Buddhism. We will note how he deploys key jātaka tales and Mahāyāna sutras as scriptural supports for the practice, and reflect on his choice of hagiographical material from China. Bio: James A. Benn…

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Hisham Matar Reading, part of the Lane Lecture Series

April 23, 2018 8:00 pm - 9:00 pm

Photo by Diana Matar Part of the Lane Lecture Series Hisham Matar was born in New York City to Libyan parents, spent his childhood in Tripoli and Cairo, and has lived most of his adult life in London. His critically acclaimed 2016 memoir The Return: Fathers, Sons and the Land in Between won the Pulitzer Prize for Autobiography and received the PEN America Book of the Year Award. In The Return, he recounts his search for his father, who was…

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May 2018

Tim H. Barrett: “A Possible Buddhist Influence on Chinese Political Thought”

May 3, 2018 6:00 pm - 7:30 pm

Abstract: Much work has been done in recent decades on the way in which Chinese rulers made use of Buddhism to bolster their power, but in fact some Buddhist ideas concerning kingship found in South Asian materials were quite negative. China was in imperial times an autocracy in which such negativity towards kingship generally did not flourish. But if we look carefully, is there really no trace at all of these Buddhist ideas entering the Chinese tradition of political thought? …

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Rupert Gethin: “On Death and Rebirth, and What Happens in Between: Two Buddhist Accounts of Why it Matters”

May 17, 2018 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

Abstract: Ancient Indian Buddhist thinkers for the most part took it as given that death was followed by rebirth, but they disagreed on whether death was followed immediately by rebirth or by an in between state (antarābhava). The lecture will consider two accounts of death and rebirth, both from the fourth to fifth centuries CE but representing the traditions of two different schools: (1) the account found in Vasubandhu’s Abhidharmakośa, which presents the traditions of the Sarvāstivāda school and advocates an in between state, and (2) the account found in the…

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Oliver Freiberger: “Lines in Water? On Drawing Buddhism’s Boundaries in Ancient India”

May 24, 2018 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

Abstract: This talk explores the ways in which religious agents – and modern scholars – distinguish religions. Illustrated by examples from ancient India, it will problematize the popular notion of blurred boundaries and suggest a multilayered approach for analyzing religious boundary-making. The paper argues that scholars should be prepared to find, even within one religious community, numerous and possibly conflicting ways of drawing a boundary between “us” and “them.” Bio: Dr. Oliver Freiberger is associate professor of Asian Studies and…

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