fbpx

Loading Events
Find Events

Event Views Navigation

Upcoming Events › Lecture / Reading

Events List Navigation

January 2020

Gallery Talk | The Melancholy Museum: Love, Death, and Mourning at Stanford

January 23 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm

Join Susan Dackerman, the John and Jill Freidenrich Director of the Cantor Arts Center, for this gallery talk on Thursday, January 23. A Mark Dion Project Using over 700 items from the Stanford Family Collections, artist Mark Dion’s new exhibition explores how Leland Stanford Jr.’s death at age 15 led to the creation of a museum, university, and—by extension—the entire Silicon Valley. Dion spent more than a year culling through the over 6,000 objects in the original Stanford Family Collections…

Find out more »

Artist Talk with ALOK

January 23 4:30 pm - 5:30 pm

Please note that the start time is 4:30pm. An incorrect time was listed in the mailed out calendar.  Join ALOK (they/them) for this talk on performance, body images, and self-fashioning. ALOK is an internationally acclaimed non-binary performance artist, designer, and educator. They appeared on HBO’s “The Trans List” and “Random Acts of Flyness,” and have authored a poetry book “Femme in Public,” and the forthcoming book “Beyond the Gender Binary,” a clarion call for a new approach to gender in…

Find out more »

Opening reception: Terry Berlier: I am what I am not yet

January 23 5:00 pm - 7:00 pm

Artist and Professor Terry Berlier brings together her interest in queerness and ecologies in I am what I am not yet, a solo exhibition at the Stanford Art Gallery, on view January 21 to March 15, 2020. Using abstract labored forms, kinetic and sound sculpture, her work suggests a path of reorienting to the world, turning things around so they can be understood differently. Join us for the opening reception on Thursday, January 23, 5–7 pm. Berlier approaches her studio practice…

Find out more »

Alexander Nemerov on Pollock and de Kooning: Two poems

January 23 6:30 pm - 7:30 pm

Join Alexander Nemerov, Department Chair of Art & Art History and the Carl and Marilynn Thoma Provostial Professor in the Arts and Humanities, as he explores the museum’s newest acquisitions through poetry. The conversation will take place in the galleries in front of Jackson Pollock’s Totem Lesson I and Willem de Kooning’s Gansevoort Street. No registration required. Seating is limited.

Find out more »

Poetry and Writing Workshop with Safia Elhillo

January 24 3:00 pm - 4:30 pm

Writing Workshop with Safia Elhillo, a Sudanese-American poet known for her written and spoken poetry. She is the author of The January Children, recipient of the 2016 Sillerman First Book Prize for African Poets and a 2018 Arab American Book Award. She is a 2018 Ruth Lilly and Dorothy Sargent Rosenberg Fellow and holds an MFA from The New School. Safia Elhillo will be hosting a writing workshop at the Harmony House and a performance later that evening at 576…

Find out more »

Encuentro Nahuatl (Working Group Series)

January 27 7:00 pm - 8:00 pm

Encuentro Nahuatl is a CLAS sponsored working group that meets on Mondays to learn Nahuatl, a Uto-Aztecan language spoken in Mexico, along with cultural activities. This weekly gatherings are open to students, community members, and the public at large.  Join us in this great adventure! FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC  LIGHT FOOD PROVIDED  Please contact jessica.cordiglia@stanford.edu for more information 

Find out more »

Louise Glück Reading, the Mohr Visiting Poet

January 27 8:00 pm - 9:00 pm

Louise Glück Free and open to the public. No tickets or reservations required. Photo by Katherine Wolkoff The Mohr Visiting Poet. Louise Glück is one of America’s most honored contemporary poets. Winner of the Pulitzer Prize, Glück is a former Poet Laureate of the United States and the author of a dozen widely acclaimed books. Stephen Dobyns, writing in the New York Times Book Review, said “no American poet writes better than Louise Glück, perhaps none can lead us so deeply…

Find out more »

A Conversation with Laurie Anderson and Jim Campbell

January 28 7:00 pm - 8:30 pm

Laurie Anderson is one of America’s most renowned—and daring—creative pioneers. Known for her multimedia presentations and recognized worldwide for her ground-breaking use of technology in the arts, she has cast herself in roles as varied as visual artist, composer, poet, photographer, filmmaker, electronics whiz, vocalist, and instrumentalist. At the Bing, Anderson will present her work, The Art of Falling. Contemporary artist Jim Campbell uses technology to filter images of daily life, mediating the audience’s encounter with his subjects and amplifying the…

Find out more »

Rooted Words XII

January 29 5:30 pm - 7:30 pm

Rooted Words is a community reading series, emerging from the Earth Systems Program and the School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences but enthusiastically open to all. We meet under the spreading blue oaks near the Electioneer Road gates at the O’Donohue Family Stanford Educational Farm. Students, staff, faculty, friends and community members are all welcome to bring a short sample of their own writing to share (5 minutes or shorter please) or to simply come and enjoy listening to…

Find out more »

Visiting Artist Lecture: Slavs & Tatars

January 29 6:00 pm - 7:30 pm

Transliterative Tease, 2013-present Through the lens of phonetic, semantic, and theological slippage, Transliterative Tease explores the potential for transliteration – the conversion of scripts – as a strategy equally of resistance and research into notions such as identity politics, colonialism, and faith. The lecture-performance focuses on the Turkic languages of the former Soviet Union, as well as the eastern and western frontiers of the Turkic sphere, namely Anatolia and Xinjiang/Uighuristan. Lenin believed that the revolution of the east begins with…

Find out more »

Searching for the Missing: Performance, Forensics, and Democracy

January 30 11:30 am - 1:20 pm

Stanford Dance Studies Colloquium presents Searching for the Missing: Performance, Forensics, and Democracy (a talk by Juan Manuel Aldape Muñoz) which is concerned with the use of forensic anthropology evidence in performances by Mexican artists. Since 2006, the legal-scientific field of forensic anthropology has received much attention to shed light on the overwhelming occurrences of forced disappearances in Mexico. Few studies have analyzed the relationship between performance and forensic practices. Aldape Muñoz evaluates how contemporary dance and performance has become…

Find out more »

Steinbeck at Stanford

January 30 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm

Free and open to the public. Registration required here. Speaker: Gavin Jones, Rehmus Family Professor in the Humanities, Stanford University John Steinbeck attended Stanford University, off and on, from the Fall of 1919 to the Spring of 1925, when he left without completing his degree. According to an article in Stanford magazine, the relationship between Stanford and Steinbeck is “puzzling, mutually unappreciative, even debilitating.” In his talk, Professor Gavin Jones argues that nothing could be farther from the truth. It…

Find out more »

Honeypot: A Performance and Book Discussion with E. Patrick Johnson

January 30 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm

Honeypot: Black Southern Women Who Love Women Combining oral history with magical realism and poetry, Honeypot is an engaging and moving book that reveals the complexity of identity while offering a creative method for scholarship to represent the lives of other people in a rich and dynamic way. Author E. Patrick Johnson is the Carlos Montezuma Professor of Performance Studies and Professor of African-American Studies at Northwestern University.

Find out more »

Film: Perfect Strangers by Jan Krawitz

January 30 5:30 pm - 7:15 pm

The Department of Art & Art History presents a screening of Perfect Strangers, a film by Jan Krawitz, professor of documentary film and video, followed by a conversation with the filmmaker, a father-daughter donor-recipient pair, and a “non-directed” kidney donor. Perfect Strangers tells the story of two unique and engaging characters. Ellie embarks on an unpredictable journey of twists and turns, determined to give away one of her kidneys. 500 miles away, Kathy endures nightly dialysis and loses hope of…

Find out more »

Film: Marina Abramović: The Artist is Present

January 30 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm

Born in Belgrade, Yugoslavia in 1946, Marina Abramović has had a long career of pushing the boundaries and concepts of the medium of performance as a visual art form.  In 2010 at The Museum of Modern Art in New York, Abramović engaged in an extended performance called, The Artist Is Present. Seated silently at a wooden table across from an empty chair, she waited as people took turns sitting in the chair and locking eyes with her. Over the course of nearly three…

Find out more »

“Why are you more important than I am?”: How much should family caregivers sacrifice?

January 30 7:00 pm - 8:30 pm

As we age and have increasing health needs, most of us don’t want to be moved into a nursing facility but staying at home is hard on the family caregiver. How much should a spouse or adult child sacrifice to become a caregiver? Their health? Their job? Their financial stability? What if the person who needs the care was a bad spouse or parent? And how do different cultures think differently about these questions? Larissa MacFarquhar, staff writer for The…

Find out more »

Medieval Matters: The Greatest Play You’ve Never Heard Of

January 30 7:30 pm - 9:00 pm

SERIES: MEDIEVAL MATTERSMedieval Matters is a series of public lectures co-sponsored by Stanford Continuing Studies and The Sarum Seminar. It explores the relevance of medieval history and culture to understanding the modern world. The Greatest Play You’ve Never Heard Of: Sir David Lyndsay, Scotland’s Lyon King, and the Story of The Three EstatesIn this evening program, Greg Walker, Regius Professor of English Literature at the University of Edinburgh (the oldest chair of English in the world), tells the story of a…

Find out more »

Concert: Secret Tale of the Tanbour

January 31 8:00 pm - 9:15 pm

Concert by acclaimed musician Ali Akbar Moradi, joined by Arash Moradi, Kourosh Moradi, and Mehdi Bagheri *Please note: This concert is free and open to the public, no ticket or RSVP are required. Seating is limited and first come first serve. Doors will open at 7:30 PM.  Ali Akbar Moradi began playing the tanbour at the age of seven and learned not only the music but the Kurdish maqam repertoire. He has won awards, recorded several albums, and performed in…

Find out more »
February 2020

Writing to Save Memory, Myth, and Ritual?

February 4 6:30 pm - 8:00 pm

*Event is in Persian/Farsi “The Drowned is the translation of Moniro Ravanipour’s first novel, Ahl-e Gharq (1989), which brought her overnight nationwide recognition in Iran a decade after the tumultuous Islamic Revolution and a year after the devastating Iran-Iraq War. In general, in this novel, Ravanipour taps the rich culture of southwestern Iran, the region most affected by the destruction of the war, and more specifically, that of Jofreh, the village of her birth, and its inhabitants’ lives, customs, beliefs,…

Find out more »

Rooted Words: “Lost & Found”

February 5 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

Event Details: Rooted Words is a community reading series, emerging from the Earth Systems Program and the School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences but enthusiastically open to all. We meet on the fifth Wednesday of each quarter at the O’Donohue Family Stanford Educational Farm. Students, staff, faculty, friends and community members are all welcome to bring a short sample of their own writing to share (5 minutes or shorter please) or to enjoy listening to others read from original…

Find out more »

Gallery Talk | The Melancholy Museum: Love, Death, and Mourning at Stanford

February 6 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm

A Mark Dion Project Using over 700 items from the Stanford Family Collections, artist Mark Dion’s new exhibition explores how Leland Stanford Jr.’s death at age 15 led to the creation of a museum, university, and—by extension—the entire Silicon Valley. Dion spent more than a year culling through the over 6,000 objects in the original Stanford Family Collections to create an exhibition that explores young Leland’s collection—he already was an avid and curious collector at the time of his death—as…

Find out more »

Bali Sahota – “The Little Clay Cart on the Way to Epic Theater”

February 6 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

If, as one of his contemporaries claims, the classic Sanskrit play The Little Clay Cart planted the seed for what would evolve as Bertolt Brecht’s hallmark epic theater, one might ask what it was about the play that suggests alternatives to Western models? What were the implications of these alternatives in the revolutionary tumult of the Weimar Republic in which Brecht encountered and espoused Marxism as his primary political outlook?  Apart from attempting to answer these questions, this presentation will also look…

Find out more »

Opening reception: Layer Cake: First-year MFA Exhibition

February 6 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

The Department of Art and Art History presents Layer Cake, an exhibition of works by five first-year MFA students in art practice: Amy Elkins, Gabriella Grill, Joshua Moreno, Miguel Novelo, and Gregory Rick. This is a very accomplished and diverse group in terms of their media and content, including drawing, digital art, painting, video, installation, and sculpture. Their work projects various social and cultural issues relevant to the artists and to all of us as well. These artists have developed…

Find out more »

Furyu Nancy Schroeder: “Are You Awake?”

February 6 6:00 pm - 7:30 pm

Abstract:  Abbess Schroeder will be using the first and second cases from the Gateless Gate Koan Collection (Wumenguan) to discuss the challenge of finding one’s way into spiritual practice without knowing just what it is we are looking for or where we might look to find it.  Bio:   Furyu Nancy Schroeder, a resident of Zen Center for over 40 years, became Abiding Abbess at Green Gulch Farm in March 2014. Fu has held most of the monastic positions at Zen Center and…

Find out more »

An Evening with Nathan Englander

February 6 6:00 pm - 7:30 pm

Jewish Community Federation and Endowment Fund Lecture Nathan Englander is the author of the novels Dinner at the Center of the Earth and The Ministry of Special Cases, and the story collections For the Relief of Unbearable Urges and What We Talk About When We Talk About Anne Frank—winner of the Frank O’Connor International Short Story Award and finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. His short fiction has been widely anthologized, most recently in 100 Years of the Best American Short…

Find out more »
+ Export Listed Events