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January 2020

Kuklejal Politics, Anti – Racist Horizons and the (Neo)Colonial Mexican State

January 10, 2020 12:30 pm - 1:20 pm

Over the past two decades, Zapatista indigenous community members have asserted their autonomy and self-determination by using everyday practices as part of their struggle for lekil kuxlejal, a dignified collective life connected to a specific territory. This in-depth ethnography summarizes Mariana Mora’s more than ten years of extended research and solidarity work in Chiapas, with Tseltal and Tojolabal community members helping to design and evaluate her fieldwork. The result of that collaboration—a work of activist anthropology—reveals how Zapatista kuxlejal (or…

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Trade and Empire: African Art’s Golden Age

January 14, 2020 7:00 pm - 8:00 pm

The 2020 Ruth K. Franklin Lecture on the Arts of Africa, Oceania, And the Americas: Gus Casely-Hayford The richest of arts do not just symbolize historic moments; these arts are tools that carve out empires. Dr. Augustus (Gus) Casely-Hayford, director of the Smithsonian National Museum of African Art, explains how the challenges posed by the Southern Atlantic Ocean thwarted West African leaders’ attempts to expand over centuries. Notably, in the fourteenth century, the young Emperor of Mali, Mansa Musa, set…

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Patreon Co-Founder and CTO Sam Yam @ ETL

January 15, 2020 4:30 pm - 5:20 pm

In 2013, Sam Yam teamed up with his former Stanford roommate Jack Conte to create Patreon, a platform that connects content creators with members who provide recurring revenue. As co-founder and CTO, Yam has built Patreon into a service that has funded more than one hundred thousand creatives, channelling an estimated one billion dollars to musicians, podcasters, and artists of all kinds.  This appearance by Sam Yam is part of the Entrepreneurial Thought Leaders series. Join us live as we…

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“Gender and Access to Justice in the Hebrew Bible” with Justice Daphne Barak-Erez

January 15, 2020 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm

Aaron Roland Endowed Lecture The lecture will address the role of women in the justice systems of the Hebrew bible, by reference to a story of one judge, the stories of several women who managed to appear as parties to trials, and other stories of women whose cases led to litigation but who themselves were not directly involved in it. Through these narratives, the lecture will assess the importance of access to justice and analyze strategies to overcome barriers on…

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Gallery Talk | Jordan Casteel: Returning the Gaze

January 16, 2020 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Join Cantor’s Assistant Curator of American Art, Aleesa Alexander, in Freidenrich Family Gallery to discuss Jordan Casteel: Returning the Gaze. Featuring paintings made in the last five years, Casteel’s large-scale portraits of Harlem community members are intimate portrayals of often overlooked members of society. In her own words, “I’ve always had an inclination toward seeing people who might be easily unseen.” Casteel’s deeply empathetic approach to portraiture makes her one of the most important emerging artists working today. Jordan Casteel: Returning…

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James Gentry: “Simplicity and Elaboration in Buddhist Theory and Practice: …”

January 16, 2020 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

“Simplicity and Elaboration in Buddhist Theory and Practice: Points of Friction in the Tantric Profile of the Great Perfection” Abstract: From the vantage point of many contemporary Tibetan Buddhist traditions, the non-dual nature of intrinsic awakened cognition—or buddhanature—serves as the pristine ground and culminating realization of the elaborate mainstream tantric visualizations, baroque ceremonials, and demanding physical postures connected with deity-yoga and subtle-body practices. Yet the presumed symbiosis between the simplicity of just letting go into intrinsic awakened cognition and the elaboration…

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Nicole Fleetwood on Marking Time: Art in the Age of Mass Incarceration

January 16, 2020 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

The Department of Art & Art History presents the new speaker series, Living Art History: Race, Methodology & Praxis, featuring Nicole Fleetwood, professor of American studies and art history at Rutgers University.  Professor Fleetwood will discuss her forthcoming book, Marking Time: Art in the Age of Mass Incarceration, which examines the impact of mass incarceration on contemporary art and culture. Focusing on art made in US prisons and in collaboration with artists and activists across the nation, she explores various…

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What Is A Public Intellectual Today: Jia Tolentino

January 16, 2020 5:30 pm - 7:30 pm

Jia Tolentino, a staff writer at the New Yorker and the author of the widely acclaimed essay collection Trick Mirror, will join Stanford’s English professor Mark Greif for a conversation about her craft and career. Formerly, Tolentino was the deputy editor at Jezebel and a contributing editor at the Hairpin. She grew up in Texas, went to University of Virginia, and received her MFA in fiction from the University of Michigan. Her work has also appeared in the New York Times Magazine, Grantland, and Pitchfork, among other places. She lives…

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Artful Design: Technology in Search of the Sublime

January 16, 2020 7:30 pm - 9:00 pm

Join us for an evening with Stanford’s Ge Wang as he unpacks the ideas and inspirations that went into his “MusiComic Manifesto,” Artful Design: Technology in Search of the Sublime. Investigating design through the vehicles of music and technology, the book begins with a simple question: What is design? In pursuit of an answer, Artful Design takes the reader on a journey of discovery—of the nature, meaning, and purpose of design in this age of technology, and the many related questions that arise.…

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“The Seventh Heaven: Travels through Jewish Latin America” with Ilan Stavans

January 21, 2020 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm

Over the last five years, Ilan Stavans (Lewis Sebring Professor of Humanities, Latin American, and Latino Culture at Amherst College) has visited all sorts of Jewish communities in the Americas, including indigenous tribes in the Amazon who believe they are descendants of the Lost Tribes, families of the desaparecidos and the 1994 terrorist attack in Buenos Aires, descendants of Crypto-Jews in northern Mexico, paramilitary groups responding to neo-Nazis in places like Patagonia, and Spanish- and Portugese-speaking Zionists to Israel from 1948…

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Keeping Harlem Black

January 22, 2020 4:30 pm - 6:00 pm

Harlem historian and activist shares insights Michael Henry Adams, a Harlem-based architectural and cultural historian, an activist for historic preservation, and tour guide takes us into the Harlem depicted in Jordan Casteel’s paintings. Following a tour of black Harlem inspired by the paintings, Adams describes the threat gentrification poses to black culture and agency by uprooting and displacing people of color from places like Harlem and Oakland. IMAGE: Jordan Casteel (U.S.A., b. 1989), Joe and Mozel (Pompette Wines), 2017. Oil…

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Stegner Fellow Reading with Lydia Conklin and Safia Elhillo

January 22, 2020 6:30 pm - 7:30 pm

Lydia Conklin  Safia Elhillo  Free and open to the public. Reading with first year Stegner Fellows in Fiction and Poetry, Lydia Conklin and Safia Elhillo. Lydia Conklin has received a Creative Writing Fulbright Scholarship to Poland, a Rona Jaffe Foundation Writers’ Award,a grant from the Elizabeth George Foundation, two Pushcart Prizes, a Creative Writing Fellowship from Emory University, work-study andtuition scholarships from Bread Loaf, and fellowships from MacDowell, Yaddo, Hedgebrook, Djerassi, the James Merrill House, Lighthouse Works, and others. Her…

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Gallery Talk | The Melancholy Museum: Love, Death, and Mourning at Stanford

January 23, 2020 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm

A Mark Dion Project Using over 700 items from the Stanford Family Collections, artist Mark Dion’s new exhibition explores how Leland Stanford Jr.’s death at age 15 led to the creation of a museum, university, and—by extension—the entire Silicon Valley. Dion spent more than a year culling through the over 6,000 objects in the original Stanford Family Collections to create an exhibition that explores young Leland’s collection—he already was an avid and curious collector at the time of his death—as…

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Artist Talk with ALOK

January 23, 2020 4:30 pm - 5:30 pm

Performance artist and writer ALOK, whose eclectic style offers a poetic challenge to the conventional gender binary, discusses performance, body images, and self-fashioning.

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Poetry and Writing Workshop with Safia Elhillo

January 24, 2020 3:00 pm - 4:30 pm

Writing Workshop with Safia Elhillo, a Sudanese-American poet known for her written and spoken poetry. She is the author of The January Children, recipient of the 2016 Sillerman First Book Prize for African Poets and a 2018 Arab American Book Award. She is a 2018 Ruth Lilly and Dorothy Sargent Rosenberg Fellow and holds an MFA from The New School. Safia Elhillo will be hosting a writing workshop at the Harmony House and a performance later that evening at 576…

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Louise Glück Reading, the Mohr Visiting Poet

January 27, 2020 8:00 pm - 9:00 pm

Louise Glück Free and open to the public. No tickets or reservations required. Photo by Katherine Wolkoff The Mohr Visiting Poet. Louise Glück is one of America’s most honored contemporary poets. Winner of the Pulitzer Prize, Glück is a former Poet Laureate of the United States and the author of a dozen widely acclaimed books. Stephen Dobyns, writing in the New York Times Book Review, said “no American poet writes better than Louise Glück, perhaps none can lead us so deeply…

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Steinbeck at Stanford

January 30, 2020 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm

Free and open to the public. Registration required here. Speaker: Gavin Jones, Rehmus Family Professor in the Humanities, Stanford University John Steinbeck attended Stanford University, off and on, from the Fall of 1919 to the Spring of 1925, when he left without completing his degree. According to an article in Stanford magazine, the relationship between Stanford and Steinbeck is “puzzling, mutually unappreciative, even debilitating.” In his talk, Professor Gavin Jones argues that nothing could be farther from the truth. It…

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Film Screening: Perfect Strangers by Jan Krawitz

January 30, 2020 5:30 pm - 7:15 pm

The Department of Art & Art History presents a screening of Perfect Strangers, a film by Jan Krawitz, professor of documentary film and video, followed by a conversation with the filmmaker, a father-daughter donor-recipient pair, and a “non-directed” kidney donor. Perfect Strangers tells the story of two unique and engaging characters. Ellie embarks on an unpredictable journey of twists and turns, determined to give away one of her kidneys. 500 miles away, Kathy endures nightly dialysis and loses hope of…

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DJ Lynnée Denise Presents:  Black To Techno and the Black Music 80’s

January 30, 2020 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm

 A Public conversation and performative lecture

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“Why are you more important than I am?”: How much should family caregivers sacrifice?

January 30, 2020 7:00 pm - 8:30 pm

As we age and have increasing health needs, most of us don’t want to be moved into a nursing facility but staying at home is hard on the family caregiver. How much should a spouse or adult child sacrifice to become a caregiver? Their health? Their job? Their financial stability? What if the person who needs the care was a bad spouse or parent? And how do different cultures think differently about these questions? Larissa MacFarquhar, staff writer for The…

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Medieval Matters: The Greatest Play You’ve Never Heard Of

January 30, 2020 7:30 pm - 9:00 pm

SERIES: MEDIEVAL MATTERSMedieval Matters is a series of public lectures co-sponsored by Stanford Continuing Studies and The Sarum Seminar. It explores the relevance of medieval history and culture to understanding the modern world. The Greatest Play You’ve Never Heard Of: Sir David Lyndsay, Scotland’s Lyon King, and the Story of The Three EstatesIn this evening program, Greg Walker, Regius Professor of English Literature at the University of Edinburgh (the oldest chair of English in the world), tells the story of a…

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February 2020

Gallery Talk | The Melancholy Museum: Love, Death, and Mourning at Stanford

February 6, 2020 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm

A Mark Dion Project Using over 700 items from the Stanford Family Collections, artist Mark Dion’s new exhibition explores how Leland Stanford Jr.’s death at age 15 led to the creation of a museum, university, and—by extension—the entire Silicon Valley. Dion spent more than a year culling through the over 6,000 objects in the original Stanford Family Collections to create an exhibition that explores young Leland’s collection—he already was an avid and curious collector at the time of his death—as…

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Furyu Nancy Schroeder: “Are You Awake?”

February 6, 2020 6:00 pm - 7:30 pm

Abstract:  Abbess Schroeder will be using the first and second cases from the Gateless Gate Koan Collection (Wumenguan) to discuss the challenge of finding one’s way into spiritual practice without knowing just what it is we are looking for or where we might look to find it.  Bio:   Furyu Nancy Schroeder, a resident of Zen Center for over 40 years, became Abiding Abbess at Green Gulch Farm in March 2014. Fu has held most of the monastic positions at Zen Center and…

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An Evening with Nathan Englander

February 6, 2020 6:00 pm - 7:30 pm

Jewish Community Federation and Endowment Fund Lecture Nathan Englander is the author of the novels Dinner at the Center of the Earth and The Ministry of Special Cases, and the story collections For the Relief of Unbearable Urges and What We Talk About When We Talk About Anne Frank—winner of the Frank O’Connor International Short Story Award and finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. His short fiction has been widely anthologized, most recently in 100 Years of the Best American Short…

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there is no Other: musical routes to racial justice | 15th Annual Anne and Loren Kieve Lecture

February 6, 2020 7:00 pm - 8:30 pm

Please join the Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity and Stanford Live for the 15th Annual Anne and Loren Kieve Distinguished Lecture and Demonstration with multi-instrumentalist and musicologist Rhiannon Giddens. Giddens is a founding member of the Grammy-winning American roots band, the Carolina Chocolate Drops, a 2017 MacArthur Genius Award recipient and a regular on CMT’s Nashville. Giddens’ brilliant work traces the 19th century evolution of the banjo from its West African origins and its subsequent travels among…

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