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January 2019

Scholars Select: Special Collections in Action

January 22 10:00 am - 6:00 pm

An exhibition of rare books, manuscripts, and objects selected by faculty to celebrate the 2019 Green Library centennial.  

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“The Talmud as Icon: How an Ancient Oral Text Came to Embody Judaism” with Barry Scott Wimpfheimer

January 24 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

The Talmud as Icon: The Babylonian Talmud is a Jewish scripture whose content has been central to the practice of Judaism and Jewish ideology for over a millennium. Because of this centrality, the Talmud has also found itself reviled and persecuted as the paradigmatic symbol of Jews and Judaism. This talk will focus on various aspects of the Talmud’s symbolic life. Barry Scott Wimpfheimer is Associate Professor of Religious Studies and Law at Northwestern University. A lifelong student of the Talmud with a…

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Hume Drop-in Writing Tutoring at El Centro Chicano y Latino

January 27 8:00 pm - 10:00 pm

Drop-in writing tutors are undergraduates who have been trained to help students at any stage of the writing process and can work with any piece of writing, from a Thinking Matters or PWR essay to a grant proposal or cover letter.

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Arts Hackathon 2019 Presentations

January 28 5:30 pm - 7:30 pm

Responding to a prompt co-created by our hackathon partners, teams  will explore new opportunities for audience engagement. Presented in partnership with San Francisco Opera, San Francisco Ballet, and Stanford Live.

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Maggie Nelson Reading, part of the Lane Lecture Series

January 28 8:00 pm - 9:00 pm

Photo by Tom Atwood Part of the Lane Lecture Series Maggie Nelson is a poet, critic, and the author of five books of non-fiction. Her books include The Red Parts: Autobiography of a Trial, The Art of Cruelty: A Reckoning, and The Argonauts– “a beautiful, passionate and shatteringly intelligent meditation on what it means not to accept binaries but to improvise an individual life that says, without fear, yes, and.”—Chicago Tribune. Nelson is also the author of four collections of poetry. In 2016 she was awarded…

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Maggie Nelson Colloquium part of the Lane Lecture Series

January 29 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

Photo by Tom Atwood Part of the Lane Lecture Series Maggie Nelson is a poet, critic, and the author of five books of non-fiction. Her books include The Red Parts: Autobiography of a Trial, The Art of Cruelty: A Reckoning, and The Argonauts– “a beautiful, passionate and shatteringly intelligent meditation on what it means not to accept binaries but to improvise an individual life that says, without fear, yes, and.”—Chicago Tribune. Nelson is also the author of four collections of poetry. In 2016 she was awarded…

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Mutual Radicalization: How Groups and Nations Drive Each Other to Extremes

January 31 6:30 pm - 8:00 pm

Radicalization has become a serious global problem. This talk explores mutual radicalization, where groups and nations push each other to extremes. Drawing from well-established psychological principles, a model of mutual radicalization is presented and international and national case studies are used as illustrative examples. Fathali M. Moghaddam is Director of the Interdisciplinary Program in Cognitive Science and Professor of Psychology at Georgetown University. He is Editor-in-Chief of the APA journal ‘Peace and Conflict: Journal of Peace Psychology’. His most recent…

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February 2019

Adrienne Mayor (Stanford), “Gods and Robots: Ancient Dreams of Technology”

February 1 12:15 pm - 1:30 pm

Long before technology made robots possible, Greek mythology envisioned ideas about creating artificial life—and grappled with ethical concerns about technology. As early as Homer, Greeks imagined robotic servants, animated statues, and even ancient versions of artificial intelligence. Many sophisticated robotic devices were actually built in antiquity, reaching a climax with the creation of a host of self-moving devices and automatons in the ancient city of learning, Alexandria, the original Silicon Valley. Join Adrienne Mayor as she explores how some of today’s most advanced innovations in robotics and AI were foreshadowed in ancient myth. Adrienne Mayor is a…

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The Canticle of the Birds: Part I

February 5 6:30 pm - 8:00 pm

**Please note this lecture is in two parts: February 5 and 7** The Iranian mystic `Attâr’s magnificent early 13th-century Persian-language Sufi epic in verse, the Manteq-ot-Tayr or “Canticle of the Birds”, tells of the quest of all the world’s birds, symbolizing human souls, to find the mythical Sun-Bird (Sîmorgh) to be their ruler. In 1487, Sultan Husayn Mîrzâ of Herât (in what is now Afghanistan) commissioned the world’s most beautiful manuscript of the poem illustrated by the finest artists in his…

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Hannibal’s Secret Weapon: Recruiting Nature into His Arsenal

February 5 7:30 pm - 9:00 pm

The Carthaginian general, Hannibal Barca, may have been the ancient pioneer of weaponizing nature to expand the power of his typically smaller army in combat engagements. While surprise was almost always one of his greatest assets, especially combined with deep military intelligence and psychological operations, Hannibal’s deep knowledge of local environments and topographies allowed him to exploit his enemies’ vulnerabilities. He invariably arrived first before battle and turned the local conditions into advantages. During the Second Punic War, he made…

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Richard Serra’s Sequence Returns

February 6 11:00 am - 5:00 pm

Sometimes a work of art leaves both metaphorical and physical marks, causing us to consider the physical space it occupied, as well as its impact, long after it’s gone. Such is the case with Richard Serra’s massive steel sculpture Sequence (2006), one of the distinguished artist’s greatest achievements. On loan and housed from 2011 to 2015 outdoors, near the Cantor’s North Lawn, Sequence literally left behind its footprint, reminding visitors where all 235 tons of it once stood. And now, after being indoors at SFMOMA for the past several years, Sequence is returning to the Cantor…

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Stegner Fellow Reading with Neha Chaudhary-Kamdar and Jay Deshpande

February 6 6:30 pm - 7:30 pm

Reading with first year Stegner Fellows in Fiction and Poetry, Neha Chaudhary-Kamdar and Jay Deshpande Neha Chaudhary-Kamdar grew up in Hyderabad, India. She holds an MFA from Boston University, where she won the William A. Holodnak Prize for fiction. Her writing has appeared in Salamander Magazine. She lives in Berkeley, CA, and is working on her first novel. Jay Deshpande is the author of Love the Stranger, named a top debut of 2015 by Poets & Writers, and of the…

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The Canticle of the Birds: Part II

February 7 6:30 pm - 8:00 pm

**Please note this is a two-part lecture** The Iranian mystic `Attâr’s magnificent early 13th-century Persian-language Sufi epic in verse, the Manteq-ot-Tayr or “Canticle of the Birds”, tells of the quest of all the world’s birds, symbolizing human souls, to find the mythical Sun-Bird (Sîmorgh) to be their ruler. In 1487, Sultan Husayn Mîrzâ of Herât (in what is now Afghanistan) commissioned the world’s most beautiful manuscript of the poem illustrated by the finest artists in his kingdom including the renowned Master…

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A Reading with Louise Glück, the Mohr Visiting Poet

February 7 8:00 pm - 9:00 pm

Photo by Katherine Wolkoff Louise Glück is one of America’s most honored contemporary poets. Winner of the Pulitzer Prize, Glück is a former Poet Laureate of the United States and the author of a dozen widely acclaimed books. Stephen Dobyns, writing in the New York Times Book Review, said “no American poet writes better than Louise Glück, perhaps none can lead us so deeply into our own nature.” Pulitzer Prize winner Robert Hass has called her “one of the purest…

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Second Sunday: Family Day

February 10 11:00 am - 4:00 pm

CANTOR ARTS CENTER & THE ANDERSON COLLECTION Drop-in Studio: Experiment with art materials and new techniques by participating in a hands-on art making experience. All visitors, regardless of age, ability, or familiarity with the creative process, are encouraged to participate.Art Packs: Check out an Art Pack that includes themed activities for visitors of all ages and supplies for sketching while visiting the galleries. Cantor Events:Sunday Spotlight: 15-minute gallery talk for all ages. Talks start at 11:30am and continue throughout the day on the half hour…

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Dissent on Aadhaar: Big Data Meets Big Brother

February 11 4:30 pm - 6:00 pm

A Book Talk by Reetika Khera (Indian Institute of Management, Ahmedabad, and 2017–18 FSI-Humanities Center International Visitor)  What are the perils, as well as promises, when governments use biometrics and big data? For individuals? For democracy?Aadhaar, India’s unique identity system, was introduced in 2009 with the stated purpose of creating a more inclusive and efficient welfare system. Hundreds of millions of Indians were enrolled into the biometric database, with successive governments creating pressure by making it compulsory for social benefits.…

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“City on a Hilltop: American Jews and the Israeli Settler Movement” with Sara Yael Hirschhorn

February 11 6:00 pm - 7:30 pm

Aaron Roland Endowed Lecture Since 1967, more than 60,000 Jewish-Americans have settled in the territories captured by the State of Israel during the Six Day War. Comprising 15 percent of the settler population today, these immigrants have established major communities, transformed domestic politics and international relations, and committed shocking acts of terrorism. They demand attention in both Israel and the United States, but little is known about who they are and why they chose to leave America to live at…

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AMY BIEHL’S LAST HOME Book Discussion and Reception

February 13 4:30 pm - 6:00 pm

Author, historian, and Stanford alumnus Steven D. Gish will discuss his new book, Amy Biehl’s Last Home: A Bright Life, a Tragic Death, and a Journey of Reconciliation in South Africa. The book offers an intimate portrait of a Stanford alumna, Fulbright scholar, and human rights activist killed in an act of political violence. Join us as we consider a life committed to racial equality and women’s rights, and a remarkable story of forgiveness and restorative justice. The Stanford bookstore…

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500 Years of Leonardo, 1519-2019 — Living with Leonardo: Fifty Years of Sanity and Insanity in the Art World and Beyond

February 19 6:00 pm - 7:30 pm

Leonardo is a unique figure in the history of world culture, attracting analysis at the highest level and a huge proliferation of crazy ideas. The lecture will look at selected incidents from Martin Kemp’s engagement with Leonardo over 50 years to show how the “detached and objective’ business of historical research becomes immersed in an unmanageable context of myth and wild theories. The moral will be that how information emerges, from whom, when and where shapes its reception in both…

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500 Years of Leonardo, 1519-2019 — Living with Leonardo: Fifty Years of Sanity and Insanity in the Art World and Beyond

February 19 6:00 pm - 7:30 pm

SERIES: 500 YEARS OF LEONARDO, 1519-2019On May 2, 1519, the Renaissance artist, architect, and engineer Leonardo da Vinci (1452– 1519) died at Clos Lucé in Amboise, France where he lived for the last three years of his life under the patronage of King Francis I. Leonardo could not have anticipated what a global icon of creativity and invention and perpetual museum exhibit he has become five hundred years later.  To commemorate the anniversary of Leonardo’s death, we are sponsoring a…

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Art Focus Lectures | Visionary Art from Bosch to Blake

February 20 4:15 pm - 6:15 pm

Artists such as Hieronymus Bosch, Pieter Breughel, Henry Fuseli, and William Blake have greatly expanded our visionary imagination by probing unusual psychological undercurrents. Strange or unexpected images occur in their art, whether by juxtaposing comparing the real with the unreal or creating hybrid beings or by possibly examining images rising from their own subconscious or unconscious minds long before psychology was understood as a scientific discipline. Some imagery is apocalyptic and religious, others consider the monstrous or fearful aspects of…

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Stegner Fellow Reading with Gothataone Moeng and sam sax

February 20 6:30 pm - 7:30 pm

Reading with first year Stegner Fellows in Fiction and Poetry, Gothataone Moeng and sam sax Gothataone Moeng was born in Serowe, Botswana. She holds an MFA Creative Writing (Fiction) from the University of Mississippi. She was shortlisted for the 2017 Miles Morland Writing Scholarship, and is a 2016 A Public Space Emerging Writer Fellow. Her writing has appeared in, or is forthcoming from, A Public Space, the Oxford American and the Columbia Journal. samsax is a queer jewish poet and…

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“Partition as a Traveling Theory? A transnational perspective on the history of Palestine’s Partition, 1937-1947” with Arie M. Dubnov and Laura Robson

February 21 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

The idea that the physical division of a territory along ethno-religious lines into separate sovereign nation-states is a desirable modus operandi is not new; but in the twenty-first century it has suddenly reemerged, conveniently divorced from its disastrously violent history, as a fashionable technique of “conflict resolution.” This talk challenges the idea of partition as a natural (if regrettable solution) to ethnic strife by locating its historical origins: in the British and French interwar attempts to lengthen the lives of…

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Kerry Tribe: The Elusive Word

February 23 11:00 am - 5:00 pm

During her residency on campus, as a guest of the Stanford Arts Institute, Tribe will teach two courses, one during the winter quarter titled Art in the Age of Neuroscienceand the other during the spring quarter titled Practice and Critique. Tribe’s films and installations have been exhibited widely including at MoMA, Tate Modern, and, most recently, they were the subject of a solo exhibition at SFMoMA. This exhibition is organized by the Cantor Arts Center. We gratefully acknowledge support from the Lynn…

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Josiah McElheny: Island Universe

February 23 11:00 am - 5:00 pm

Bringing artist Josiah McElheny’s Island Universe to the Cantor is a rare opportunity to examine both cutting-edge art and physics. The monumental installation of five hanging chandeliers is a visual response to recent theories of the multiverse, an elaboration of the Big Bang theory. The installation is both visually stunning and carefully constructed according to measurements that map the history of time.

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