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October 2017

Taking Charge of Your Education: Pathways for Humanities PhDs

October 4 5:30 pm - 7:30 pm

Join the School of Humanities & Sciences for wine and cheese and a chance to meet fellow grads in other humanities and arts departments, as well as a variety of campus leaders. Lanier Anderson (Senior Associate Dean for the Humanities and Arts) and Matthew Tiews (Associate Vice President for the Arts) will speak briefly about how you can take advantage of Stanford’s resources to plan broadly for your future. We will also distribute a guide to key professional development opportunities for…

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Shahnameh and its Oral Traditions

October 5 6:30 pm - 8:30 pm

Jalil Doostkhah is an eminent scholar of Iranian literature and culture, with an abiding interest in the country’s grand epic, Shahnameh. He has published extensively on different aspects of the country’s ancient culture and religion as well as on the textual history and meaning of Shahnameh. He will be discussing his research on some of the oral sources of Shahnameh as well as the role of the rich tradition of ritualized recitation of the text, or Naggali, in its preservation…

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Professor Robbert Dijkgraaf, Director of the Institute for Advanced Study

October 5 7:00 pm - 8:00 pm

Robbert Dijkgraaf, Director of the Institute for Advanced Study and Leon Levy Professor since 2012, is a mathematical physicist who has made significant contributions to string theory and the advancement of science education. He is President of the InterAcademy Partnership, a past President of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences, and a distintguished public policy adviser and advocate for science and the arts. For his contributions to science, he has received the Spinoza Prize, the highest scientific award…

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A Conversation with Karen Joy Fowler

October 5 7:00 pm - 8:30 pm

This event is part of the Tehnology & Human Values series. Fowler is one of three authors this year, who will speak about their work in relation to ethics and science fiction.  Karen Joy Fowler is the author of three story collections and six novels, including We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves, which won the PEN/Faulkner Award as well as the California Book Award for Fiction for 2013, and was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize the first year the prize…

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FILM: Divino Inferno [Rodin and The Gates of Hell]

October 12 6:00 pm - 7:30 pm

Divino Inferno [Rodin and The Gates of Hell] (2017)A film by Bruno AveillanWritten by Zoé Balthus and Bruno AveillanRunning time: 60 minutes Screening followed by a Q&A with Bruno Aveillan, Zoé Balthus and Dr. Jean Baptiste Chantoiseau, Editor at Musée Rodin (Paris). Produced by ARTE, National French Museum Guild (RMN), NOIR, and Quad & Fix Studio, the 60-minute documentary is based around one of Auguste Rodin’s most emblematic works, The Gates of Hell. Divino Inferno reveals the little-known story behind The Gates of Hell – one of the most enigmatic masterpieces in…

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Frankenstein@200 Opening Colloquium: What is human? What is monster?

October 17 7:00 pm - 8:30 pm

Moderator: Jane Shaw, Dean for Religious Life, Professor of Religious Studies Panelists:Denise Gigante, Professor of EnglishShane Denson, Assistant Professor of Art and Art HistoryAleta Hayes, Lecturer, Theater and Performance StudiesRuss Altman, Kenneth Fong Professor of Bioengineering, of Genetics, of Medicine, of Biomedical Data Science, and, by courtesy, of Computer ScienceHank Greely, Deane F. and Kate Edelman Johnson Professor of Law and, by courtesy, of Genetics

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The Buddha’s Word @ Stanford

October 18 11:00 am - 5:00 pm

This exhibition showcases Buddhist manuscripts and prints held at the Cantor and in Stanford libraries, ranging in dates from around the 11th century to the early 20th century, and coming from various parts of the traditional Buddhist world, from Sri Lanka to Japan. The Buddha’s Word highlights the written word not simply as the visual counterpart to speech but as a thing of beauty and sacredness in and of itself. IMAGE: Artist unknown (Nepal, 12th C.), Pages from a Manuscript of…

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The Crown under the Hammer: Russia, Romanovs, Revolution

October 18 11:00 am - 5:00 pm

Ruth Levison Halperin Gallery, Lynn Krywick Gibbons Gallery at the Cantor Arts Center and the Herbert Hoover Memorial Exhibit Pavilion Marking the centenary of the Russian Revolution of 1917 this exhibition examines the political, social, and cultural upheavals that transformed Russia in the final decades of the Romanov dynasty and the first years of Soviet Communism. Jointly organized by the Hoover Institution Library & Archives and the Cantor Arts Center, this dual-site exhibition features a wide variety of art objects and…

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Earthly Hollows: Cave and Kiln Transformations

October 18 11:00 am - 5:00 pm

This exhibition presents a focused look at caves and kilns, aka “earthly hollows,” as symbolic and physical passages of transformation. Drawing from Cantor’s rich collection of Chinese, Japanese, and Korean art, Earthly Hollows: Cave and Kiln Transformations examines the dynamic ways in which caves, be they mountain grottoes or kilns, tunnel-like chambers made of earth and clay, interface mundane and mystical realms. This exhibition presents a focused look at caves and kilns, aka “earthly hollows,” as symbolic and physical passages of…

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Anti-Clericalism in Medieval Persian Poetry

October 19 6:30 pm - 8:30 pm

Dr. Leonard Lewisohn is Senior Lecturer in Persian and Iran Heritage Foundation Fellow at the Institute of Arab and Islamic Studies of the University of Exeter where he teaches Islamic Studies, Sufism, history of Iran, as well as courses on Persian texts and Persian poetry in translation. He specializes in translation of Persian Sufi poetic and prose texts. He has authored many books including Beyond Faith and Infidelity: The Sufi Poetry and Teachings of Mahmud Shabistari (London: Curzon Press 1995), and…

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Gallery Talk: The Buddha’s Word @ Stanford

October 21 12:00 pm - 12:30 pm

Please join Ellen Huang, Curatorial Fellow, Asian Art at Cantor Arts Center, Paul Harrison, George Edwin Burnell Professor of Religious Studies at Stanford University, and Michaela Mross, Assistant Professor of Religious Studies at Stanford University for a gallery talk in The Buddha’s Word @ Stanford. The Buddha’s Word @ Stanford showcases Buddhist manuscripts and prints held at the Cantor and in Stanford libraries, ranging in dates from around the 11th century to the early 20th century, and coming from various parts of…

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Between Information Aesthetics and Design Amplification | Professor Claus Pias

October 23 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

Media, Architecture, and Computing (ca. 1970) Around the year 1970, “technocratic” themes such as planning theory, semiotics, mathematics, cybernetics, and designs based on algorithms and set theory became widespread aspects of architecture. A juxtaposition of the “Stuttgart School” and the “Architecture Machine Group” will reveal the fundamental differences between the reception of cybernetics in Germany and the United States. Whereas in Germany the discussion centered on scientific aesthetics, a computer-based critique of art, and the promises of quantification and objectivity,…

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Tracy K. Smith Reading, part of the Lane Lecture Series

October 30 8:00 pm - 9:00 pm

Photo by Rachel Eliza Griffiths Part of the Lane Lecture Series Tracy K. Smith is the author of the critically acclaimed memoir Ordinary Light (Knopf, 2015) and three books of poetry. Her collection Life on Mars won the 2012 Pulitzer Prize and was selected as a New York Times Notable Book. Duende won the 2006 James Laughlin Award from the Academy of American Poets and an Essence Literary Award. The Body’s Question was the winner of the 2002 Cave Canem Poetry Prize. Smith was the recipient of a Rona Jaffe…

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November 2017

2017 Contemplation by Design Summit: Nov 1 – Nov 9

November 1 12:00 am

SAVE THE DATES Free events will be offered Nov. 1-9, 2017 to further balance, tranquility, resilience, and creative excellence. CBD Summit participants will have the opportunity to take a break from their high-level output of productivity and innovation in order to rest and renew the mind-body-spirit. The full 2017 Summit schedule is posted at: http://contemplation.stanford.edu/summit.php

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About Face: Intimacy and Abstraction in Photographic Portraits

November 1 11:00 am - 5:00 pm

This exhibition considers the voyeuristic intimacy of the close-up portrait in thirteen photographs by celebrated photographers Ansel Adams, Imogen Cunningham, John Gutmann, Barbara Morgan, and Edward Weston. Dating from the 1920s to the early 1940s, each striking photograph captures a likeness and the mood set by the subject’s personality. Taken in close proximity  or  cropped  in the darkroom,  they present  their  subjects  in great detail but also allow passages of abstraction  to emerge from  the  clean  geometry of  the compositions.IMAGE:…

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In Search of Miki: Hayakawa, a “Forgotten” American/Japanese/Woman Artist in Pre-WWII California | ShiPu Wang

November 1 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

THE OTHER AMERICAN MODERNS: Matsura, Ishigaki, Noda Hayakawa ShiPu Wang, Associate Professor of Art History at the University of California, Merced, recounts his circuitous pursuit of the “lost” paintings of Hayakawa (ミキ早川, 1899-1953), a critically-acclaimed California artist who is largely unknown today. Through piecing together scattered details of Hayakawa’s enigmatic life, Wang recovers an Exclusion-era history of a vibrant, multi-racial/cultural artistic community in which the artist and her compatriots defiantly thrived. This talk is drawn from Wang’s new book, The…

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A Celebration of the Life and Poetry of Denise Levertov

November 2 7:30 pm - 9:00 pm

Denise Levertov was one of the most distinguished and engaging poets of the 20th century. Her work is characterized by moral courage, passionate imagination, exquisite craftsmanship, and unpretentious accessibility. Stanford was fortunate to have Levertov on the faculty for a number of years, and her influence on poets throughout the Bay Area has been indelible.  Early in her career, through her friendships with Robert Creeley and Robert Duncan, she became associated with the so-called Black Mountain School, experimenting in what…

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CBD 2017: The Hidden Life of Trees: Book discussion on nature and interconnectedness

November 3 5:30 pm - 6:45 pm

The Hidden Life of Trees illustrates in vivid ways how trees in the forest are social beings. Join us as we use the book as a starting point to open up discussion about how trees interact with each other in similar ways to human beings, exploring and cultivating appreciation for the uncanny parallels between our lives and theirs. NOTE: Feel free to join us even if you have not finished the book. Facilitator: Sairus Patel is co-editor of Trees of…

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CBD 2017: The Hidden Life of Trees: Book discussion on nature and interconnectedness

November 4 5:15 pm - 6:30 pm

The Hidden Life of Trees illustrates in vivid ways how trees in the forest are social beings. Join us as we use the book as a starting point to open up discussion about how trees interact with each other in similar ways to human beings, exploring and cultivating appreciation for the uncanny parallels between our lives and theirs. NOTE: Feel free to join us even if you have not finished the book. Facilitator: Sairus Patel is co-editor of Trees of…

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CBD 2017: The Hidden Life of Trees: Book discussion on nature and interconnectedness

November 5 5:15 pm - 6:30 pm

The Hidden Life of Trees illustrates in vivid ways how trees in the forest are social beings. Join us as we use the book as a starting point to open up discussion about how trees interact with each other in similar ways to human beings, exploring and cultivating appreciation for the uncanny parallels between our lives and theirs. NOTE: Feel free to join us even if you have not finished the book. Facilitator: Sairus Patel is co-editor of Trees of…

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CBD 2017: Using Stories to Deepen Your Presence to Life

November 6 12:30 pm - 1:45 pm

Like meditation, stories and storytelling have long been a vehicle for creating greater presence to ourselves, others, and our world. In this workshop, you will explore how to turn your encounters with stories into contemplative practices, with many of the same benefits of mindfulness and compassion practices. Join us to experience how to use stories and storytelling to reflect deeply and create more intimacy in all of your relationships. Instructor: Jonah Willihnganz, MFA, PhD, has taught literature and writing at…

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CBD 2017: What Makes Living Things Tick, The Restless Clock

November 8 12:30 pm - 1:30 pm

Ever since the beginnings of modern science in the 17th century, philosophers and scientists have used clockwork as a metaphor to describe the universe and the natural world. Clockwork generally makes one think of something rigid, rote, constrained, something that ticks along without changing. However, hidden within this centuries-old clockwork metaphor is a tradition of people who have understood clocks, and nature, very differently: as restless, responsive, and dynamic. These renegades include the German philosopher Leibniz who first described living…

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CBD 2017: Keynote with Alice Walker – Taking the Arrow Out of the Heart: Noticing where you are, and who or what is there with you

November 8 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm

Tickets for this Contemplation By Design keynote event are available through the Stanford Ticketing Office starting Tuesday, September 12th at 9:00am by clicking HERE. (Registration for all other Contemplation By Design Summit sessions is available at: contemplation.stanford.edu/summit.php  The summit is November 1-9, 2017.) “No one escapes a time in life when the arrow of sorrow, of anger, of despair pierces the heart. For many of us, there is the inevitable need to circle the wound. It is often such a surprise to find it…

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World of Thieves: A Global History of the Chinese Swindle Story

November 14 4:30 pm - 6:00 pm

Please RSVP here.  Free and open to the public. About the talk: Why do collections of swindle stories appear at certain times and places? In China, for example, the swindle story has experienced bursts of popularity during the late Ming, the early Republican era, the early Mao era, and during the last 20 years. And comparable works exist around the world. What, for example, do Zhang Yingyu’s Book of Swindles (Ming China, 1617), Richard King’s The New Cheats of London…

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December 2017

A Bridge Taken for a Wall, a Wall Taken for a Bridge: On Persian Art, Poetry, and Translation

December 7 6:30 pm - 8:30 pm

Jahan Ramazani is University Professor and Edgar F. Shannon Professor of English at the University of Virginia. He is currently writing a book on poetry in a global age. This talk on poetry, art, and East-West translation ranges from ancient Iran to medieval Byzantium and the Abbasid era to modern Iran and Ireland. The lecture is in three parts. The first looks at the Persian artistic influences via Byzantium on a modern Irish poet that have passed largely unrecognized (a bridge…

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January 2018

Claire Messud Reading, part of the Lane Lecture Series

January 22, 2018 8:00 pm - 9:00 pm

Claire Messud is a recipient of Guggenheim and Radcliffe Fellowships and the Strauss Living Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Author of six previous works of fiction including her most recent novel, The Burning Girl, she lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts, with her family.

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Heterogeneous Critique; A Proposal from a Latin American(ist) Point of View

January 26, 2018 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Speaker: Dr. Friedhelm Schmidt-Welle By introducing the concept of “heterogeneous critique”, I propose a theoretical and methodological framework and an alternative to universalist approaches in literary and cultural criticism, approaches which even include the trend to apply Anglo-Saxon postcolonialist positions on Latin American cultures. I will analyze the decline of universalist theory exemplified by the crisis of literary history and the emergence of a new regionalism in Latin American cultural critique which tries to overcome the invisibility of local theoretical…

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February 2018

The Matter of Photography in the Americas

February 7, 2018 11:00 am - 5:00 pm

Featuring artists from twelve different countries, this exhibition presents a wide range of creative responses to photography as an artistic medium and a communicative tool uniquely suited to modern media landscapes and globalized economies. The artists in this exhibition resist the impulse to “document” or “photograph anew” the world immediately around them. Instead, they employ a wide range of materials — from prints and drawings to photocopies and audio installations — to highlight the ways in which photography shapes our…

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April 2018

Health Humanities Consortium Conference

April 20, 2018 12:00 am

A three-day celebration of the 200th anniversary of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein through an exploration of medically-based ethical dilemmas and an examination of the relevance of Frankenstein in moral imagination today.

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Hisham Matar Reading, part of the Lane Lecture Series

April 23, 2018 8:00 pm - 9:00 pm

Photo by Diana Matar Part of the Lane Lecture Series Hisham Matar was born in New York City to Libyan parents, spent his childhood in Tripoli and Cairo, and has lived most of his adult life in London. His critically acclaimed 2016 memoir The Return: Fathers, Sons and the Land in Between won the Pulitzer Prize for Autobiography and received the PEN America Book of the Year Award. In The Return, he recounts his search for his father, who was…

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