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January 2020

Persian Poetics

January 24 10:00 am - 5:00 pm

At the interface of Self and Other, what theories of the lyric subject are elaborated in Persian literature, both medieval and modern? What are the philosophical foundations underlying discussions of poetic practice and how do these practices in turn affect our understanding of an individual poetics? Is there a point where poetics turns into ethics? And how do we, as members of the Western academy, justify our critical practice with regard to a tradition to which we are, in essence,…

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Louise Glück Reading, the Mohr Visiting Poet

January 27 8:00 pm - 9:00 pm

Louise Glück Free and open to the public. No tickets or reservations required. Photo by Katherine Wolkoff The Mohr Visiting Poet. Louise Glück is one of America’s most honored contemporary poets. Winner of the Pulitzer Prize, Glück is a former Poet Laureate of the United States and the author of a dozen widely acclaimed books. Stephen Dobyns, writing in the New York Times Book Review, said “no American poet writes better than Louise Glück, perhaps none can lead us so deeply…

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Visiting Artist Lecture: Slavs & Tatars

January 29 6:00 pm - 7:30 pm

Transliterative Tease, 2013-present Through the lens of phonetic, semantic, and theological slippage, Transliterative Tease explores the potential for transliteration – the conversion of scripts – as a strategy equally of resistance and research into notions such as identity politics, colonialism, and faith. The lecture-performance focuses on the Turkic languages of the former Soviet Union, as well as the eastern and western frontiers of the Turkic sphere, namely Anatolia and Xinjiang/Uighuristan. Lenin believed that the revolution of the east begins with…

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Steinbeck at Stanford

January 30 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm

Free and open to the public. Registration required here. Speaker: Gavin Jones, Rehmus Family Professor in the Humanities, Stanford University John Steinbeck attended Stanford University, off and on, from the Fall of 1919 to the Spring of 1925, when he left without completing his degree. According to an article in Stanford magazine, the relationship between Stanford and Steinbeck is “puzzling, mutually unappreciative, even debilitating.” In his talk, Professor Gavin Jones argues that nothing could be farther from the truth. It…

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Honeypot: A Performance and Book Discussion with E. Patrick Johnson

January 30 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm

Honeypot: Black Southern Women Who Love Women Combining oral history with magical realism and poetry, Honeypot is an engaging and moving book that reveals the complexity of identity while offering a creative method for scholarship to represent the lives of other people in a rich and dynamic way. Author E. Patrick Johnson is the Carlos Montezuma Professor of Performance Studies and Professor of African-American Studies at Northwestern University.

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Medieval Matters: The Greatest Play You’ve Never Heard Of

January 30 7:30 pm - 9:00 pm

SERIES: MEDIEVAL MATTERSMedieval Matters is a series of public lectures co-sponsored by Stanford Continuing Studies and The Sarum Seminar. It explores the relevance of medieval history and culture to understanding the modern world. The Greatest Play You’ve Never Heard Of: Sir David Lyndsay, Scotland’s Lyon King, and the Story of The Three EstatesIn this evening program, Greg Walker, Regius Professor of English Literature at the University of Edinburgh (the oldest chair of English in the world), tells the story of a…

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February 2020

Writing to Save Memory, Myth, and Ritual?

February 4 6:30 pm - 8:00 pm

*Event is in Persian/Farsi “The Drowned is the translation of Moniro Ravanipour’s first novel, Ahl-e Gharq (1989), which brought her overnight nationwide recognition in Iran a decade after the tumultuous Islamic Revolution and a year after the devastating Iran-Iraq War. In general, in this novel, Ravanipour taps the rich culture of southwestern Iran, the region most affected by the destruction of the war, and more specifically, that of Jofreh, the village of her birth, and its inhabitants’ lives, customs, beliefs,…

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Rooted Words: “Lost & Found”

February 5 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

Event Details: Rooted Words is a community reading series, emerging from the Earth Systems Program and the School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences but enthusiastically open to all. We meet on the fifth Wednesday of each quarter at the O’Donohue Family Stanford Educational Farm. Students, staff, faculty, friends and community members are all welcome to bring a short sample of their own writing to share (5 minutes or shorter please) or to enjoy listening to others read from original…

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An Evening with Nathan Englander

February 6 6:00 pm - 7:30 pm

Jewish Community Federation and Endowment Fund Lecture Nathan Englander is the author of the novels Dinner at the Center of the Earth and The Ministry of Special Cases, and the story collections For the Relief of Unbearable Urges and What We Talk About When We Talk About Anne Frank—winner of the Frank O’Connor International Short Story Award and finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. His short fiction has been widely anthologized, most recently in 100 Years of the Best American Short…

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First Friday: For Stanford Students

February 7 8:00 pm - 10:00 pm

Enjoy a night out at the Cantor on the First Friday of the month during the academic year, with evenings full of art-making, music, and special performances. This program is organized by the Cantor Arts Center and made possible through the generous support of the Joan and John Jay Corley Fund for Performance, the Kenneth D. Brenner family Fund for Student Outreach, and the Bobbie and Mike Wilsey Fund for Education. Admission Info FREE

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Bob Dylan Between Lyric and Music

February 13 7:30 pm - 9:00 pm

Join us for a conversation about Bob Dylan and the art of song. Everyone knows Dylan’s songs, but little attention has been paid to how he has transformed the craft of songwriting. In this talk, author and teacher Timothy Hampton will discuss the ways in which lyric and music intertwine and shape each other in Dylan’s compositions. Together we will take a peek under the hood of some of Dylan’s most iconic songs to see how they work. We will…

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CANCELED – Ocean Vuong Reading, the Stein Visiting Writer

February 18 8:00 pm - 9:00 pm

Ocean Vuong Free and open to the public. No tickets or reservation required.  Photo Credit: Tom Hines Ocean Vuong is the author of the debut novel, On Earth We’re Briefly Gorgeous, out from Penguin Press (2019) and forthcoming in 19 languages worldwide. He is also the author of the critically acclaimed poetry collection, Night Sky with Exit Wounds, a New York Times Top 10 Book of 2016, winner of the T.S. Eliot Prize, the Whiting Award, the Thom Gunn Award,…

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Louise Glück Colloquium, the Mohr Visiting Poet

February 19 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

Louise Glück Free and open to the public. No tickets or reservations required. Photo by Katherine Wolkoff The Mohr Visiting Poet. Louise Glück is one of America’s most honored contemporary poets. Winner of the Pulitzer Prize, Glück is a former Poet Laureate of the United States and the author of a dozen widely acclaimed books. Stephen Dobyns, writing in the New York Times Book Review, said “no American poet writes better than Louise Glück, perhaps none can lead us so deeply…

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What Is A Public Intellectual Today: Tressie McMillan Cottom

February 19 5:30 pm - 7:30 pm

Tressie McMillan Cottom is an award-winning Associate Professor of Sociology at Virginia Commonwealth University and a faculty affiliate at Harvard University’s Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society. Her work has been recognized nationally and internationally for the urgency and depth of her incisive critical analysis of technology, higher education, class, race, and gender. With tens of thousands of readers amassed over years of writing and publishing, McMillan Cottom’s columns have appeared in The Atlantic, The New York Times, The Washington…

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A Stegner Reading with Matthew Denton-Edmundson and Claire Meuschke

February 19 6:30 pm - 7:30 pm

Matthew Denton-Edmundson Claire Meuschke Free and open to the public. Reading with first year Stegner Fellows in Fiction and Poetry, Matthew Denton-Edmundson and Claire Meuschke. Matthew Denton-Edmundson earned a BA from the University of Virginia and an MA from Virginia Polytechnic Institute. He then managed a farm in south western Virginia. His work has appeared inRaritanandThe Hedgehog Review. Claire Meuschke grew up in the San Francisco Peninsula on what once was Ohlone land. Her debut poetry collectionUpendis forthcoming from Noemi…

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Another Look Book Club: Mary McCarthy’s “Memories of a Catholic Girlhood”

February 19 7:30 pm - 9:00 pm

“If I could not win fame by goodness, I was ready to do it by badness.” ~ Mary McCarthy (1912-1989) Join us on Wednesday, February 19, for the “Another Look” book club discussion of Mary McCarthy’s Memories of a Catholic Girlhood. In her 1957 book, the author describes living among a complicated, sometimes abusive, extended family after her her parents died during the 1918 flu epidemic. She writes with merciless wit and frankness. While appreciating the classical foundation her Catholic education…

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Roanne Kantor- What Indian Poets Imagined Latin American Literature Could Do

February 20 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

“The one from which we aught to learn”: What Indian Poets Imagined Latin American Literature Could Do In 1969, the poet Arvind Krishna Mehrotra wrote to his friend Adil Jussawalla “my heart’s theory–we’re part of Latin America…and their literature is the one from which we aught to learn.” While we might think of Salman Rushdie and magical realism as the primary literary articulation points between these two regions, it was Mehrotra, Jussawalla, and their earlier generation of multilingual, polymath artists who…

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Iran Reframed: Anxieties of Power in the Islamic Republic

February 20 6:30 pm - 8:00 pm

“An inside look at what it means to be pro-regime in Iran, and the debates around the future of the Islamic Republic. More than half of Iran’s citizens were not alive at the time of the 1979 Revolution. Now entering its fifth decade in power, the Iranian regime faces the paradox of any successful revolution: how to transmit the commitments of its political project to the next generation. New media ventures supported by the Islamic Republic attempt to win the…

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Lan Samantha Chang Reading, part of the Lane Lecture Series

February 24 8:00 pm - 9:00 pm

Lan Samantha Chang Free and open to the public. No tickets or reservations required. Part of the Lane Lecture Series. Lan Samantha Chang was born and raised in Wisconsin and educated at Yale University and the University of Iowa. Her fiction has appeared inThe AtlanticandThe Best American Short Stories. Her collectionHungerwas a finalist for theLos Angeles TimesArt Seidenbaum Award. She has written the novelsInheritance, which won the PEN Open Book Award, andAll Is Forgotten, Nothing Is Lost.A former Wallace Stegner…

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Lan Samantha Chang Colloquium, part of the Lane Lecture Series

February 25 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

Lan Samantha Chang Free and open to the public. No tickets or reservations required. Part of the Lane Lecture Series. Lan Samantha Chang was born and raised in Wisconsin and educated at Yale University and the University of Iowa. Her fiction has appeared inThe AtlanticandThe Best American Short Stories. Her collectionHungerwas a finalist for theLos Angeles TimesArt Seidenbaum Award. She has written the novelsInheritance, which won the PEN Open Book Award, andAll Is Forgotten, Nothing Is Lost.A former Wallace Stegner…

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Author Talk: Jenny Odell

February 27 6:45 pm - 7:45 pm

Author Jenny Odell is an multi-disciplinary artist and writer based in Oakland, California. Her work generally involves acts of close observation, whether it’s birdwatching, collecting screen shots, or trying to parse bizarre forms of e-commerce. Her visual work has been exhibited at The Contemporary Jewish Museum, the New York Public Library, Ever Gold Projects, the Marjorie Barrick Museum (Las Vegas), Les Rencontres D’Arles, Fotomuseum Antwerpen, Fotomuseum Winterthur, La Gaîté Lyrique (Paris), the Lishui Photography Festival (China), the Pratt Manhattan Gallery, apexart (NY), East Wing (Dubai),…

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Stanford Writers in Conversation: An Evening with Namwali Serpell

February 27 7:30 pm - 9:00 pm

SERIES: STANFORD WRITERS IN CONVERSATIONEach program in this series will bring to center stage a distinguished author from the Stanford community. We will discuss a fiction writer’s process—from the genesis of an idea to the nuts and bolts of the prose’s inner workings to the editing and publication process—and engage the local community in a lively Q&A session. The program will be hosted by Sara Houghteling, former Nancy Packer Lecturer in Continuing Studies. An Evening with Namwali SerpellJoin us for…

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March 2020

Ilana Pardes: in Conversation on “The Song of Songs: A Biography”

March 3 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm

The Song of Songs has been embraced for centuries as the ultimate song of love. But the kind of love readers have found in this ancient poem is strikingly varied. Ilana Pardes invites us to explore the dramatic shift from readings of the Song as a poem on divine love to celebrations of its exuberant account of human love. With a refreshingly nuanced approach, she reveals how allegorical and literal interpretations are inextricably intertwined in the Song’s tumultuous life. The…

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CANCELED – Ocean Vuong Colloquium, the Stein Visiting Writer

March 4 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

Ocean Vuong  Free and open to the public. No ticket or reservation required.  Photo Credit: Tom Hines Ocean Vuong is the author of the debut novel, On Earth We’re Briefly Gorgeous, out from Penguin Press (2019) and forthcoming in 19 languages worldwide. He is also the author of the critically acclaimed poetry collection, Night Sky with Exit Wounds, a New York Times Top 10 Book of 2016, winner of the T.S. Eliot Prize, the Whiting Award, the Thom Gunn Award,…

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Learning from the Dead about the Living: Jewish Daily Life in Medieval Northern Europe

March 4 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm

David S. Lobel Visiting Scholar Lecture Elisheva Baumgarten is the Prof. Yitzchak Becker Chair for Jewish Studies and professor in the Department of Jewish History and Contemporary Jewry and the Department of History.  Her research focuses on the social history of the Jews of medieval Ashkenaz. Her book Mothers and Children: Jewish Family Life in Medieval Europe (Princeton, 2004) won the Koret Prize for the Best Book in Jewish History (2005) and the AJS Schnitzer award for the Best Book in Gender Studies…

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