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December 2019

Left of Center: Student Curator Talks

December 21 1:30 pm - 2:00 pm

Left of Center: Five Years of the Anderson Collection at Stanford University is the first fully student-curated exhibition created for the museum. Join one of the graduate students from Stanford Department of Art and Art History for an informative talk in the galleries in which they share their reflections on the exhibit, the artworks, and the artists.

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January 2020

Second Sunday Family Day

January 12, 2020 11:00 am - 4:00 pm

Cantor Events: Drop-in Studio: Experiment with art materials and new techniques by participating in the hands-on art-making experience. All visitors, regardless of age, ability, or familiarity with the creative process, are encouraged to attend.Art Packs: Check out an Art Pack that includes themed activities for visitors of all ages and supplies for sketching while visiting the galleries.Sunday Spotlight: 15-minute gallery talk for all ages. Talks start at 11:30 am and continue throughout the day on the half hour through 2:30 pm.Activity Table: Inspired by…

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Nicole Fleetwood on Marking Time: Art in the Age of Mass Incarceration

January 16, 2020 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

The Department of Art & Art History presents the new speaker series, Living Art History: Race, Methodology & Praxis, featuring Nicole Fleetwood, professor of American studies and art history at Rutgers University.  Professor Fleetwood will discuss her forthcoming book, Marking Time: Art in the Age of Mass Incarceration, which examines the impact of mass incarceration on contemporary art and culture. Focusing on art made in US prisons and in collaboration with artists and activists across the nation, she explores various…

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Artful Design: Technology in Search of the Sublime

January 16, 2020 7:30 pm - 9:00 pm

Join us for an evening with Stanford’s Ge Wang as he unpacks the ideas and inspirations that went into his “MusiComic Manifesto,” Artful Design: Technology in Search of the Sublime. Investigating design through the vehicles of music and technology, the book begins with a simple question: What is design? In pursuit of an answer, Artful Design takes the reader on a journey of discovery—of the nature, meaning, and purpose of design in this age of technology, and the many related questions that arise.…

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Crossing the Caspian: Persia and Europe, 1500-1700

January 22, 2020 11:00 am - 5:00 pm

Crossing the Caspian explores the golden age of artistic exchange between the Safavid Empire of Persia and Europe. Featuring prints, drawings, miniature paintings, rare books and maps, as well as objects of porcelain and silk, this exhibition examines the opening of new geographic, diplomatic, and mercantile routes between Persia and Europe in the seventeenth century. The pieces assembled here include works by artists from Antwerp, Amsterdam, Paris, Hollstein, Qazvin, Isfahan, and Shiraz. Together, the works represent the process of coming…

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Outside Looking In: John Gutmann, Helen Levitt, and Wright Morris

January 22, 2020 11:00 am - 5:00 pm

This exhibition presents work by three American photographers in The Capital Group Foundation Photography Collection at Stanford University who used the camera to observe the public lives and, occasionally, private spaces of others. German-born John Gutmann (1905–1998) settled in the Bay Area in 1933 and documented the spectrum of American society with an eye for the absurd, sensational, and grotesque. Author and artist Wright Morris (1910–1998) created a photographic portrait of his relations and their hard-scrabble, rural way of life…

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Gallery Talk | The Melancholy Museum: Love, Death, and Mourning at Stanford

January 23, 2020 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm

A Mark Dion Project Using over 700 items from the Stanford Family Collections, artist Mark Dion’s new exhibition explores how Leland Stanford Jr.’s death at age 15 led to the creation of a museum, university, and—by extension—the entire Silicon Valley. Dion spent more than a year culling through the over 6,000 objects in the original Stanford Family Collections to create an exhibition that explores young Leland’s collection—he already was an avid and curious collector at the time of his death—as…

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Selma

January 25, 2020 7:30 pm - 9:30 pm

Film with Live Score: Jason Moran & Marvin Sewell  The 2014 Oscar-winning movie—starring Oprah Winfrey, David Oyelowo, and Tessa Thompson—tells the story of the 1965 march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama. Protesting segregationist repression and led by Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and now-U.S. Representative John Lewis (D-GA.), it helped lead to passage of the Voting Rights Act later that year. Jazz pianist Jason Moran joins the Wordless Music Orchestra to provide the film with a live score.

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Film Screening: “Becoming Who I Was”

January 30, 2020 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm

Film Screening: “Becoming Who I Was” (2016) Directors: Moon Chang-yong, Jeon Jin Professor James Gentry will introduce the film and take questions after the showing. “After being identified as the reincarnation of a venerated Buddhist master, young Padma Angdu makes an arduous journey with his aging guardian from Northern India to Tibet to find his rightful place in the world.” Co-Sponsored by the Ho Center for Buddhist Studies at Stanford This event belongs to the following series: Tibetan Studies Initiative

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February 2020

Gallery Talk | The Melancholy Museum: Love, Death, and Mourning at Stanford

February 6, 2020 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm

A Mark Dion Project Using over 700 items from the Stanford Family Collections, artist Mark Dion’s new exhibition explores how Leland Stanford Jr.’s death at age 15 led to the creation of a museum, university, and—by extension—the entire Silicon Valley. Dion spent more than a year culling through the over 6,000 objects in the original Stanford Family Collections to create an exhibition that explores young Leland’s collection—he already was an avid and curious collector at the time of his death—as…

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Weintz Art Lecture Series presents Rosalyn Deutsche

February 20, 2020 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

The Department of Art & Art History’s J. Fred Weintz and Rosemary Weintz Art Lecture Series presents “Christopher D’Arcangelo’s Elliptical Interruptions,” a lecture by Rosalyn Deutsche, professor of art history at Barnard College. In 1975, a very young artist named Christopher D’Arcangelo chained himself to the main doors of New York’s Whitney Museum of American Art. That same year, he staged related guerilla performances at the city’s other major art museums. These actions, occupations, or demonstration/questions, as D’Arcangelo variously called…

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Rite of Spring

February 21, 2020 7:30 pm - 9:30 pm

Yang Liping  Chinese dance legend and renowned choreographer Yang Liping—a 2018 judge on So You Think You Can Dance: China—brings her stunning reimagining of Stravinsky’s Rite of Spring to Stanford. A product of her native Chinese culture intermingled with the Tibetan concept of nature and life, Liping’s Rite of Spring spins an abstract legend of the path of salvation embodied by the sacrificial peacock. Through spectacular set design and exquisite costumes, the production creates a distinctive universe where time, space, and life coexist in endless…

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Into the Twilight Zones: Art and Virtual/Augmented Reality in the West

February 27, 2020 4:30 pm - 6:45 pm

Event Speakers Jeremy Bailenson: Thomas More Storke Professor of Communications, Stanford University Elizabeth Merrit: Vice President of Strategic Foresight, Center for the Future of Museums Yelena Rachitsky: Executive Producer of Media, Oculus/Facebook Jennifer Steinkamp: VR Artist It is the intention of this symposium to explore the challenges, opportunities, and limitations that the emergence of virtual and augmented reality offers artists and museums based in the American West. This event will investigate the ways art and technology are driving how art…

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March 2020

“Court Music and Dances from Japan: A Gagaku Performance by The Hideki Bunno Gagaku Ensemble”

March 3, 2020 7:30 pm - 9:30 pm

Maestro Hideaki Bunno, former Director of the Gagaku Orchestra at the Tokyo Imperial Palace and living national treasure of Japan, brings to California his new Gagaku ensemble, composed of former directors of the Imperial Palace Orchestra as lead instrumentalists as well as major Gagaku musicians from all over Japan. Maestro Bunno is the 36th generation of a family that has transmitted the art of the shō (a type of mouth organ, an instrument unique to Gagaku) for more than 1300…

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Dreaming California—A Love Story: An Evening with Artist, Poet, and Naturalist Obi Kaufmann

March 4, 2020 7:30 pm - 9:00 pm

Obi Kaufmann is the author of The California Field Atlas (which received a 2018 California Book Award Gold Medal and was a San Francisco Chronicle Best Seller) and the recently published The State of Water: Understanding California’s Most Precious Resource. Sunset magazine called him “a modern-day John Muir. . . who will change the way you see the world.” Kaufmann has hiked the length and breadth of the Golden State chronicling his intimate relationship with California’s abundant flora and fauna, watersheds, deserts, and mountains in beautifully rendered…

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Christensen Distinguished Lecture presents Jacqueline Stewart

March 12, 2020 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

The Department of Art & Art History’s Christensen Distinguished Lecture presents Jacqueline Stewart, professor of cinema and media studies and director of the Gray Center for Arts and Inquiry at the University of Chicago.  Jacqueline Stewart’s research and teaching explore African American film cultures from the origins of the medium to the present, as well as the archiving and preservation of moving images, and “orphan” media histories, including nontheatrical, amateur, and activist film and video. She directs the South Side Home…

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CANCELED – Gallery Talk | The Melancholy Museum: Love, Death, and Mourning at Stanford

March 18, 2020 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

A Mark Dion Project Using over 700 items from the Stanford Family Collections, artist Mark Dion’s new exhibition explores how Leland Stanford Jr.’s death at age 15 led to the creation of a museum, university, and—by extension—the entire Silicon Valley. Dion spent more than a year culling through the over 6,000 objects in the original Stanford Family Collections to create an exhibition that explores young Leland’s collection—he already was an avid and curious collector at the time of his death—as…

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April 2020

Paper Chase: Ten Years of Collecting Prints, Drawings, and Photographs at the Cantor

April 3, 2020 11:00 am - 5:00 pm

Experience over 100 acquisitions to the Cantor’s collection that investigate issues of identity, social justice, and humanity’s changing relationship with nature. IMAGE: Ambreen Butt (Pakistan, b. 1969), Untitled, 2008. Hard ground and soft ground etching, aquatint, spitbite aquatint, drypoint, and chine collé, with hand-coloring. Palmer Gross Ducommun Fund, 2011.38.5 Admission Info Cantor Arts Center: Open Wed-Mon, 11am – 5pm, Thurs until 8pm. CLOSED TUES

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CANCELED – Gallery Talk | The Melancholy Museum: Love, Death, and Mourning at Stanford

April 24, 2020 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

A Mark Dion Project Using over 700 items from the Stanford Family Collections, artist Mark Dion’s new exhibition explores how Leland Stanford Jr.’s death at age 15 led to the creation of a museum, university, and—by extension—the entire Silicon Valley. Dion spent more than a year culling through the over 6,000 objects in the original Stanford Family Collections to create an exhibition that explores young Leland’s collection—he already was an avid and curious collector at the time of his death—as…

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Todd Hido, Sources and Influences

April 28, 2020 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

The Department of Art & Art History presents American photographer Todd Hido. In this lecture, Hido will discuss how he arrived at being the artist he is today. This is a candid presentation of not only his own work. Starting with his early influences, he will go through not just the personal sources where his work comes from, but also generously discuss the aesthetic influences that helped form and shape his image making. He will also discuss the process of…

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Studio Lecture Series presents Yoshua Okón

April 30, 2020 5:00 pm - 7:30 pm

The Department of Art & Art History’s Studio Lecture Series presents artist Yoshua Okón, who will give an overview of his practice from the last 20 years with special emphasis on works that address issues related to violence in the age of neoliberal globalization.  Yoshua Okón was born in Mexico City in 1970 where he currently lives. His work, like a series of near-sociological experiments executed for the camera, blends staged situations, documentation, and improvisation, and questions habitual perceptions of…

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May 2020

“Religion, Pain, and Selfhood: Anthropologists and the Study of Buddhism”

May 2, 2020 9:00 am - 5:00 pm

By Invitation Only Graduate Students WorkshopThis workshop aims to bring together scholars of Buddhism working in medical anthropology to discuss how ethnographic studies of pain, loss and suffering contribute to our understanding of religion, particularly in a Buddhist context.   Speakers: Felicity Aulino (Providing for Others; University of Massachusetts, Amherst) Julia Cassaniti (Living Buddhism, Remembering the Present; Washington State University)C. Julia Huang (Charisma and Compassion; Harvard University) Moderator:Tanya Marie Luhrmann (When God Talks Back, Stanford University)

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Weintz Art Lecture Series presents Nicola Suthor

May 4, 2020 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

The Department of Art & Art History’s J. Fred Weintz and Rosemary Weintz Art Lecture Series presents Nicola Suthor, Professor of Art History at Yale University.  Nicola Suthor teaches Northern and Southern Baroque art, in particular painting and sculpture. She looks into the periods of the Renaissance and the Enlightenment for a deeper understanding of the 17th century. Her art historical approach deals with ancient as well contemporary aesthetics and art theories as theoretical framework. Her research is an effort…

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Hank Glassman: “Thoughts on the Iconography and Practice of the Five Cakra Stupa in Ippen hijiri-e”

May 14, 2020 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

Abstract:The five cakra stupa, or gorintō, is ubiquitous in Japanese cemeteries today. Even when the stone graves do not take the gorintō shape (cube, sphere, pyramid, hemisphere, and jewel), the flat wooden slats placed behind them do. These so-called “plank stupas” or itatōba are placed behind graves at periodic memorial services and are common to virtually all Buddhist sects. The late thirteenth-century illustrated biography of the charismatic Buddhist leader Ippen offers a glimpse of the early days. Bio:Hank Glassman studies Buddhist culture in medieval Japan.…

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Ven. Miao Guang: “Coming Home to the Bodhisattva Heart…”

May 21, 2020 6:00 pm - 7:30 pm

“Coming Home to the Bodhisattva Heart: Understanding and Practicing the Heart Sutra in the 21st Century” Abstract:Ven. Miao Guang will be using the Heart Sutra as a guideline to show how the bodhisattva wisdom and compassion are cultivated through a three-level understanding of sunyata, and realizing a reality of true connection between the self and other. Bio:Ven. Miao Guang is the Personal English Interpreter to the founder of Fo Guang Shan Buddhist Order — Venerable Master Hsing Yun, who has…

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