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October 2017

Talking about a Revolution: Gallery Talk Series

October 19 12:00 pm - 12:30 pm

An Introduction to The Crown under the Hammer: Russia, Romanovs, Revolution  This gallery talk with Jodi Roberts, Robert M. and Ruth L. Halperin Curator for Modern and Contemporary Art, Cantor Arts Center, is an introduction to The Crown under the Hammer: Russia, Romanovs, Revolution  MORE TALKS IN THIS SERIES: OCTOBER 21, 1PM, Russia’s Crown under Armand HAMMER!  with Edward Kasinec, visiting fellow, Hoover Institution Library & Archives   OCTOBER 25, 2PM, A Russian Artist Paints the Revolution  with Elena S. Danielson, archivist emerata, Hoover Institution Library &…

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Opening Reception | InTransit: 4th Annual Undergraduate Juried Exhibition

October 19 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

The Stanford Department of Art & Art History presents InTransit, the 4th Annual Undergraduate Juried Exhibition, on view October 17 through December 3, 2017 with a reception on Thursday, October 19, from 4-6pm. This exhibition features a selection of artwork made by undergraduates, campus wide. “It is very refreshing to see the creativity and energy thriving among our undergraduates. InTransit is only a sample of a wider experience across disciplines that our students engage in throughout different departments. We tried…

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Artist Talk: Nina Katchadourian

October 19 6:30 pm - 8:00 pm

Brooklyn-based artist, Nina Katchadourian, discusses her artistic practice and the exhibition Nina Katchadourian: Curiouser on view in Pigott Family Gallery at Cantor Arts Center from September 15, 2017 – January 7, 2018. This program is free and open to the public. No tickets or registration is required. Doors open at 6pm. Katchadourian: Curiouser explores several major bodies of work by celebrated Stanford-born, Brooklyn-based artist Nina Katchadourian (b. 1968), including video, photography, sculpture, and sound art. Katchadourian’s work reveals the creative…

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Anti-Clericalism in Medieval Persian Poetry

October 19 6:30 pm - 8:30 pm

Dr. Leonard Lewisohn is Senior Lecturer in Persian and Iran Heritage Foundation Fellow at the Institute of Arab and Islamic Studies of the University of Exeter where he teaches Islamic Studies, Sufism, history of Iran, as well as courses on Persian texts and Persian poetry in translation. He specializes in translation of Persian Sufi poetic and prose texts. He has authored many books including Beyond Faith and Infidelity: The Sufi Poetry and Teachings of Mahmud Shabistari (London: Curzon Press 1995), and…

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The On Hold Music Dance Party

October 19 9:00 pm - 10:00 pm

Join us for dancing after hours at Cantor Arts Center. The On Hold Music Dance Party, a concept invented by artist Nina Katchadourian, is a dance party consisting of music and other sounds recorded entirely from phone calls where she was placed on hold. Collaborating with DJ Shakey (Julie Covello) and DJ Stylus (Gabriel Willow), Katchadourian (DJ Dusty) spins this raw material into a surprisingly dynamic and extremely danceable set. The On Hold Music Dance Party takes place from 9 –…

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Xandra Ibarra performs “Nude Laughing”

October 20 11:00 am - 11:30 am

Ibarra’s work hyperbolizes modes of racialization and sexualization to test the boundaries between her own body and coloniality, compulsory whiteness, and Mexicanidad. Ibarra performs Nude Laughing as part of the “Vital Signs” event series. “Vital Signs,” curated by acclaimed performance artist Cassils, pairs artists from different generations, assessing their approach to triaging the social body. Drawing from John Currin’s painting Laughing Nude (1998), this performance engages the skin and skein of race. Nude and encased in a nylon skin cocoon, the performer…

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Artist Dialogue with Harry Gamboa Jr. & Xandra Ibarra: Vital Signs Guest Artist Series

October 20 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm

Fall quarter Vital Signs artists Harry Gamboa Jr. and Xandra Ibarra conclude their visits to Stanford with a public dialogue regarding their approaches for triaging the social body. Follows Harry Gamboa Jr.’s lecture on October 19 and Xandra Ibarra’s performance on the 19th (See all events). A Q&A with the artists will follow. About the Vital Signs Guest Artist Series Vital signs are important indications of the status of the body’s life-sustaining functions. Vital Signs is also a series of…

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The Pill: Chemistry, Art & Art History and the Legacy of Carl Djerassi

October 20 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

The Departments of Art & Art History, and Chemistry at Stanford University present The Pill: Chemistry, Art & Art History and the Legacy of Carl Djerassi. A renaissance man in every sense of the word, Stanford professor Carl Djerassi is widely known for his remarkable achievements in chemistry and the arts. The world-renowned scientist, artist, poet and novelist is remembered most as the man who sparked a cultural revolution by developing the first oral contraceptive, which earned him the nickname,…

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Andrew Bird

October 20 7:30 pm - 9:00 pm

Dubbed a “one-man orchestra of the imagination” by TED, Chicago-born Andrew Bird is a multi-instrumentalist who pays equal attention to his violin and guitar onstage, and an arcane lyricist who whistles full solos with blithe, perfect clarity. His recent collaborations include artists like St. Vincent, Fiona Apple, Blake Mills, and more. Before he became the indie-folk star he is today, Bird studied classical violin at Northwestern University’s prestigious school of music. Since releasing his first album in 1996, he has…

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Friends of Music Faculty Showcase

October 20 7:30 pm - 9:00 pm

Members of Stanford’s Music Faculty will be featured in this recital presented by the Friends of Music. Thomas Schultz, piano Rick Vandivier, guitar Charlie McCarthy, saxophone The Friends of Music supports scholarships for student musicians at Stanford, as well as other Department of Music programs.

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The Buddha’s Word @ Stanford

October 21 11:00 am - 5:00 pm

This exhibition showcases Buddhist manuscripts and prints held at the Cantor and in Stanford libraries, ranging in dates from around the 11th century to the early 20th century, and coming from various parts of the traditional Buddhist world, from Sri Lanka to Japan. The Buddha’s Word highlights the written word not simply as the visual counterpart to speech but as a thing of beauty and sacredness in and of itself. IMAGE: Artist unknown (Nepal, 12th C.), Pages from a Manuscript of…

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Earthly Hollows: Cave and Kiln Transformations

October 21 11:00 am - 5:00 pm

This exhibition presents a focused look at caves and kilns, aka “earthly hollows,” as symbolic and physical passages of transformation. Drawing from Cantor’s rich collection of Chinese, Japanese, and Korean art, Earthly Hollows: Cave and Kiln Transformations examines the dynamic ways in which caves, be they mountain grottoes or kilns, tunnel-like chambers made of earth and clay, interface mundane and mystical realms. This exhibition presents a focused look at caves and kilns, aka “earthly hollows,” as symbolic and physical passages of…

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Gallery Talk: The Buddha’s Word @ Stanford

October 21 12:00 pm - 12:30 pm

Please join Ellen Huang, Curatorial Fellow, Asian Art at Cantor Arts Center, Paul Harrison, George Edwin Burnell Professor of Religious Studies at Stanford University, and Michaela Mross, Assistant Professor of Religious Studies at Stanford University for a gallery talk in The Buddha’s Word @ Stanford. The Buddha’s Word @ Stanford showcases Buddhist manuscripts and prints held at the Cantor and in Stanford libraries, ranging in dates from around the 11th century to the early 20th century, and coming from various parts of…

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Talking about a Revolution: Gallery Talk Series

October 21 1:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Russia’s Crown under Armand Hammer! This gallery talk with Edward Kasinec, visiting fellow, Hoover Institution Library & Archives, examines master merchant Armand Hammer’s sale of Russian Imperial Art and rare books in 1930s America. MORE TALKS IN THIS SERIES: OCTOBER 19, 1PM, An Introduction to The Crown under the Hammer: Russia, Romanovs, Revolution with Jodi Roberts, Robert M. and Ruth L. Halperin Curator for Modern and Contemporary Art, Cantor Arts Center  OCTOBER 25, 2PM, A Russian Artist Paints the Revolution  with Elena S. Danielson, archivist…

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Gallery Talk: Earthly Hollows: Cave and Kiln Transformation

October 21 2:00 pm - 2:30 pm

Please join Ellen Huang, Curatorial Fellow, Asian Art at Cantor Arts Center for a gallery talk in Earthly Hollows: Cave and Kiln Transformation. Earthly Hollows: Cave and Kiln Transformation presents a focused look at caves and kilns, aka “earthly hollows,” as symbolic and physical passages of transformation. Drawing from Cantor’s rich collection of Chinese, Japanese, and Korean art, Earthly Hollows: Cave and Kiln Transformation examines the dynamic ways in which caves, be they mountain grottoes or kilns, tunnel-like chambers made…

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Celebration of the Birth of Bahá’u’lláh (200th anniversary)

October 21 2:00 pm - 4:00 pm

Exactly 200 years ago, Baha’u’llah appeared in Persia and devoted himself to the education and upliftment of humanity.  He proclaimed that all are members of one human family, that the “best beloved of all things” in the sight of God is justice, that through justice humanity will build a world characterized by peace and unity, that religion is to be the cause of love and affection rather than disagreement and apathy, and that each person is responsible for his or her…

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Diwali @ MemChu

October 21 4:30 pm - 5:30 pm

The Office for Religious Life, along with the Hindu Students Association and Stanford India Association, invites you to join in the Diwali celebrations. All are welcome to attend. Diwali (also known as Deepavali) is an annual Hindu “festival of lights” that celebrates the victory of goodness over evil. Goddess Lakshmi, the goddess of material and spiritual prosperity, is worshipped on this day, and scriptural stories also commemorate the successes of Lord Rama and Lord Krishna on this special day. Hindu…

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SFJAZZ Collective

October 21 7:30 pm - 9:30 pm

Founded in 2004 in San Francisco, this award-winning octet celebrates legendary jazz artists by performing their masterworks and by creating new music expanding on those influences. This year it’s Miles Davis’ turn. The octet—Miguel Zenón, alto sax; David Sánchez, tenor sax; Warren Wolf, vibraphone; Sean Jones, trumpet; Robin Eubanks, trombone; Edward Simon, piano; Matt Penman, bass; and Obed Calvaire, drums—explores the Miles of myth and reality and his blues/jazz connections.

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Compline: An Evening Service of Song

October 22 9:00 pm - 9:30 pm

Compline (pronounced “komp-lin”) A reflective, contemplative 30-minute service of hymns, anthems and chant sung by Stanford and local choral ensembles in the tranquil candlelit ambiance of Memorial Church. All are welcome. Sundays, 9:00 – 9:30 pm (during the academic year with the exception of university holidays and academic breaks) in Memorial Church. Valley Presbyterian Church will be performing this evening. 

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Between Information Aesthetics and Design Amplification | Professor Claus Pias

October 23 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

Media, Architecture, and Computing (ca. 1970) Around the year 1970, “technocratic” themes such as planning theory, semiotics, mathematics, cybernetics, and designs based on algorithms and set theory became widespread aspects of architecture. A juxtaposition of the “Stuttgart School” and the “Architecture Machine Group” will reveal the fundamental differences between the reception of cybernetics in Germany and the United States. Whereas in Germany the discussion centered on scientific aesthetics, a computer-based critique of art, and the promises of quantification and objectivity,…

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Guerrilla Audio: Do It Yourself By Any Means Necessary!

October 24 4:30 pm - 6:00 pm

Darren Korb, Guerrilla Audio: Do It Yourself By Any Means Necessary! Darren began working in games with no game development experience, no sound design experience, and a whole lot of questions! In this talk, he’ll discuss techniques for getting a lot of bang-for-your-audio-buck, and ramping up your understanding of sound implementation in games as quickly as possible. Darren Korb is the award winning Composer and Audio Director for Supergiant Games. He has composed the music, generated sound effects, and recorded…

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Cary Cordova on “The Heart of the Mission: Latino Art and Politics in San Francisco”

October 24 5:15 pm - 7:00 pm

Stanford’s American Studies Program Presents: Cary Cordova, Associate Professor of American Studies at UT Austin on her book The Heart of the Mission: Latino Art and Politics in San Francisco In The Heart of the Mission, Cary Cordova combines urban, political, and art history to examine how the Mission District, a longtime bohemian enclave in San Francisco, has served as an important place for an influential and largely ignored Latino arts movement from the 1960s to the present.  Home to Chileans, Cubans,…

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San Francisco Stories: Belva Davis—A Pioneer in Journalism

October 24 7:30 pm - 9:00 pm

In 1963, Belva Davis became the first African American woman in television journalism on the West Coast. She was already established as a reporter in print and radio, and her career in Bay Area journalism went on to span five decades. She covered stories as varied as the Berkeley Free Speech Movement, the Black Panther Party, the assassinations of San Francisco Mayor George Moscone and Supervisor Harvey Milk, the mass suicide at Jonestown, and more. In this talk, Davis will…

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Talking about a Revolution: Gallery Talk Series

October 25 2:00 pm - 2:30 pm

A Russian Artist Paints the Revolution This gallery talk with Elena S. Danielson, archivist emerita, Hoover Institution Library & Archives, highlights the work of Ivan A. Vladimirov, a formally trained battle artist who was embedded in the Imperial Russian Army to record historic scenes in war time. MORE TALKS IN THIS SERIES: OCTOBER 19, 1PM, An Introduction to The Crown under the Hammer: Russia, Romanovs, Revolution with Jodi Roberts, Robert M. and Ruth L. Halperin Curator for Modern and Contemporary Art, Cantor Arts Center  OCTOBER 21, 1PM, Russia’s Crown…

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“The Many Deaths of Jew Süss: The Notorious Trial and Execution of an Eighteenth-Century Court Jew” with Yair Mintzker

October 25 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm

Joseph Süss Oppenheimer—”Jew Süss”—is one of the most iconic figures in the history of anti-Semitism. In 1733, Oppenheimer became the “court Jew” of Carl Alexander, the duke of the small German state of Württemberg. When Carl Alexander died unexpectedly, the Württemberg authorities arrested Oppenheimer, put him on trial, and condemned him to death for unspecified “misdeeds.” On February 4, 1738, Oppenheimer was hanged in front of a large crowd just outside Stuttgart. He is most often remembered today through several…

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Pedro de Lemos: A Visionary Who Transformed American Art

October 25 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

An Illustrated Public Talk with Curator, Dr. Robert W. Edwards After a brief introduction, which summarizes the advancement of Pedro de Lemos (1882-1954) as a celebrated artist, educator, and proponent of the Arts & Craft Movement, the focus turns to his astonishing innovations in the field of printmaking.  In the early 1900s etchings, aquatints, and color block prints were considered esoteric and expensive disciplines that were taught at a few established art schools and universities.  In a series of publications…

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DLCL Fall Film Series Screening: Rivers and Tides (2001) Thomas Riedelsheimer

October 25 6:30 pm - 9:00 pm

Riedelsheimer’s documentary Rivers and Tides offers a rare glimpse of the creations of British environmentalist artist Andy Goldsworthy.  Goldsworthy’s works, created in natural settings from local materials including rocks, leaves, icicles, and mud, challenge notions of the proper setting, audience, and purpose of art, even as arguably some of the most natural artworks one might create.  The film Rivers and Tides allows these uniquely fleeting works to be preserved on screen as it dives deeply into the creative process of…

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“A.I. Artificial Intelligence”

October 25 7:30 pm - 10:00 pm

Film Studies 119/319 “Synthetic Humans” presents Steven Spielberg’s acclaimed film A.I. Artificial Intelligence as part of the Frankenstein@200 Film Festival.

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Mariza

October 25 8:00 pm - 9:00 pm

Three friends, three talents, one music. Mariza returns to the Bing with friends Jorge Fernando and Custódio Castelo to transform the studio into a Portuguese tavern with her latest project “Raizes” (“roots”). Of both Portuguese and African descent, Mariza has come to be known as the embodiment of modern fado, Lisbon’s emotion-filled folk music. Her soulful voice expresses the essence of this melancholy art form, a song style dating back to the early 19th century and imbued with themes of…

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Launch Your Social Impact Career with a Post-Graduate Fellowship (Info Session #2)

October 26 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm

Attention Seniors! Passionate about serving in the public interest? Don’t have plans for next year? Explore our post-graduate fellowships: funded full-time opportunities to work with a mentor in a public mission-driven organization of your choosing. Come to our informational session to learn about former Fellows’ experiences and get insider tips on the application process.

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The Russian Revolution Comes to Stanford: Alexander Kerensky on Campus

October 26 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm

Speaker: Bertrand M. Patenaude, Research Fellow, Hoover Institution Alexander Kerensky was the charismatic leader of the Provisional Government that held a tenuous grip on power in Russia between the fall of the Romanovs in February 1917 and the storming to power of the Bolsheviks in the October Revolution. Kerensky first visited Stanford in 1955 and spent much of the next ten years on campus, conducting research in the Hoover Library & Archives, teaching seminars, giving guest lectures, and appearing on…

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The Destruction of Hood’s Ordnance Train: A Love Story | Professor Alex Nemerov

October 26 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

The Department of Art & Art History presents The Destruction of Hood’s Ordnance Train: A Love Story, a lecture by Professor Alexander Nemerov, Chair and Carl and Marilynn Thoma Provostial Professor in the Arts and Humanities.  How is something that is not there still present in a photograph?  What is the importance of seeing a photograph in this way? This lecture is free and open to the public with advance registration (opens early September) Image: George Barnard, Destruction of Hood’s…

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Gallery Talk: In Dialogue: African Arts

October 26 6:00 pm - 6:30 pm

Amanda M. Maples, Curatorial Fellow for African and Indigenous American Art, discusses In Dialogue: African Arts. In Dialogue represents the vibrant and dynamic arts of the continent and its diasporas. Drawing primarily from the Cantor’s own collection, it considers the arts of Africa to be rooted in a deep and rich history that is locally, as much as globally, connected. The exhibition will prompt the viewer, both new to and familiar with African arts, to wonder — who, where, when, why and even…

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Daniel Pearl World Music Days Concert

October 26 7:30 pm - 8:30 pm

Stanford musicians, including members of the St. Lawrence String Quartet, curate this annual free concert honoring the life and memory of alumnus Daniel Pearl, the violin-playing Wall Street Journal reporter who was murdered in 2002 in Pakistan. This year’s concert will feature the premiere of Stanford composer Jonathan Berger’s Death by Drowning, performed by violinist-collaborators MoVE, as well as the poignant and intense Duo (1925) for Violin and Cello by Erwin Schulhoff, performed by Owen Dalby and Christopher Costanza of…

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Building Meaningful Relationships – Yoga Wisdom and Mantra Music Meditation

October 26 7:30 pm - 9:00 pm

Human relationships are a complex universe. Sometimes we put our hearts into a relationship; we try to develop it to the best of our capability. However, we are not successful in building with the counterpart what was within our intentions. The quality of any relationship is guaranteed only if we know how to appreciate the qualities of others. The lack of such appreciation produces lack of relationships. The first indispensable step is to learn how to recognize the value of…

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NOON CONCERT: Brass Students of McDowell Kenley

October 27 12:30 pm - 1:30 pm

Brass students are featured in this noontime recital (Program TBA.) 

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Halloween Concert: Stanford Wind Symphony and Stanford Symphony Orchestra

October 27 7:30 pm - 9:00 pm

The annual Halloween Concert by the Stanford Symphony Orchestra and Stanford Wind Symphony will include music from Game of Thrones, The Wizard of Oz, Phantom of the Opera, and Hamilton, and more. Plus, the ever-popular Costume Competition, making this a concert you won’t want to miss!

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Until the Lions

October 27 7:30 pm - 8:30 pm

Acclaimed choreographer Akram Khan brings the full range of his artistry to bear in his newest work, Until the Lions, based on the ancient epic Mahabharata, using both Indian kathak and modern dance in a tale of transformation and justice exacted by a bride wronged on her wedding day. Rianto, a dancer personally selected by Akram Khan to take on the lead role, performs with two female dancers and four musicians to tell the bride’s story in a powerful departure…

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The Stradivarius Ensemble of the Mariinsky Orchestra

October 29 2:30 pm - 4:00 pm

The Mariinsky Orchestra’s Stradivarius Ensemble, an elite group of string musicians led by conductor extraordinaire Valery Gergiev, plays on priceless period instruments (like the one played by the famous cellist Pablo Casals). Young virtuoso Behzod Abduraimov, acclaimed for the precision, tenderness, and fire of his interpretations, will play Shostakovich’s Piano Concerto No. 1. Also on the bill: Grieg’s Holberg Suite, Richard Strauss’ Metamorphosen, and Tchaikovsky’s Serenade for Strings.

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Compline: An Evening Service of Song

October 29 9:00 pm - 9:30 pm

Compline (pronounced “komp-lin”) A reflective, contemplative 30-minute service of hymns, anthems and chant sung by Stanford and local choral ensembles in the tranquil candlelit ambiance of Memorial Church. All are welcome. Sundays, 9:00 – 9:30 pm (during the academic year with the exception of university holidays and academic breaks) in Memorial Church. Early Music Singers will be performing this evening. 

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“Get Out”

October 30 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm

Jordan Peele’s acclaimed film Get Out will be screened with an introduction and post-film discussion led by Dr. Jennifer DeVere Brody, Professor of Theater & Performance Studies and Director of the Center for Comparative Studies in Race & Ethnicity, and Quinn Garret, Class of 2018. 

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Launch Your Social Impact Career with a Post-Graduate Fellowship (Info Session #3)

October 30 7:30 pm - 8:30 pm

Attention Seniors! Passionate about serving in the public interest? Don’t have plans for next year? Explore our post-graduate fellowships: funded full-time opportunities to work with a mentor in a public mission-driven organization of your choosing. Come to our informational session to learn about former Fellows’ experiences and get insider tips on the application process.

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The Death of Jesus: Comparing Christian, Jewish, and Muslim Accounts

October 30 7:30 pm - 9:00 pm

Christian, Jewish, and Muslim representations of how Jesus/Yeshu/`Isa died developed over centuries, promoting very different understandings and valuations of the event itself, its aftermath, and its significance. At stake in these competing narrations were claims about messiahship, prophethood, divine sonship—and God’s favored people. This talk involves a close weighing side by side of (a) select Christian interpretations of the meaning of Jesus’s death in Gospels, creeds, and art; (b) two Jewish writings—a parody of the life of Yeshu/Jesus and a…

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Tracy K. Smith Reading, part of the Lane Lecture Series

October 30 8:00 pm - 9:00 pm

Photo by Rachel Eliza Griffiths Part of the Lane Lecture Series Tracy K. Smith is the author of the critically acclaimed memoir Ordinary Light (Knopf, 2015) and three books of poetry. Her collection Life on Mars won the 2012 Pulitzer Prize and was selected as a New York Times Notable Book. Duende won the 2006 James Laughlin Award from the Academy of American Poets and an Essence Literary Award. The Body’s Question was the winner of the 2002 Cave Canem Poetry Prize. Smith was the recipient of a Rona Jaffe…

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“Strangers at the Gate: Biblical Narratives of Israelites and their Neighbors” with Adriane Leveen

October 31 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Throughout the Hebrew Bible, strangers are indispensable to the formation of a collective Israelite identity. In fact, encounters between the Israelites and their neighbors are among the most urgent matters explored in biblical narratives, yet relatively little scholarly attention has been paid to them. This book corrects that imbalance by carrying out close readings of the accounts of Israel’s myriad interactions with surrounding nations. Dr. Adriane Leveen received her Ph.D. in Hebrew Bible from the University of California at Berkeley…

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November 2017

2017 Contemplation by Design Summit: Nov 1 – Nov 9

November 1 12:00 am

SAVE THE DATES Free events will be offered Nov. 1-9, 2017 to further balance, tranquility, resilience, and creative excellence. CBD Summit participants will have the opportunity to take a break from their high-level output of productivity and innovation in order to rest and renew the mind-body-spirit. The full 2017 Summit schedule is posted at: http://contemplation.stanford.edu/summit.php

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About Face: Intimacy and Abstraction in Photographic Portraits

November 1 11:00 am - 5:00 pm

This exhibition considers the voyeuristic intimacy of the close-up portrait in thirteen photographs by celebrated photographers Ansel Adams, Imogen Cunningham, John Gutmann, Barbara Morgan, and Edward Weston. Dating from the 1920s to the early 1940s, each striking photograph captures a likeness and the mood set by the subject’s personality. Taken in close proximity  or  cropped  in the darkroom,  they present  their  subjects  in great detail but also allow passages of abstraction  to emerge from  the  clean  geometry of  the compositions.IMAGE:…

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Talking about a Revolution: Gallery Talk Series

November 1 12:00 pm - 12:30 pm

Why Montage Fever? Pavle Levi, director, Center for Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies and associate professor, Film and Media Studies, Department of Art & Art History leads a gallery talk which focuses on the centrality of montage in early Soviet art and cinema. Emphasis will be placed on Constructivist theory and practice, as they flourished in the immediate post-revolutionary period. “Montage Fever,” the film-based installation in the Lynn Krywick Gibbons Gallery will also be discussed. MORE TALKS IN THIS SERIES: OCTOBER 19,…

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NOON CONCERT: Cello Students of Stephen Harrison

November 1 12:30 pm - 1:30 pm

Cello students are featured in this noontime concert. (Program TBA.) 

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In Search of Miki: Hayakawa, a “Forgotten” American/Japanese/Woman Artist in Pre-WWII California | ShiPu Wang

November 1 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

THE OTHER AMERICAN MODERNS: Matsura, Ishigaki, Noda Hayakawa ShiPu Wang, Associate Professor of Art History at the University of California, Merced, recounts his circuitous pursuit of the “lost” paintings of Hayakawa (ミキ早川, 1899-1953), a critically-acclaimed California artist who is largely unknown today. Through piecing together scattered details of Hayakawa’s enigmatic life, Wang recovers an Exclusion-era history of a vibrant, multi-racial/cultural artistic community in which the artist and her compatriots defiantly thrived. This talk is drawn from Wang’s new book, The…

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DLCL Fall Film Series Screening: Science is Fiction (1927) Jean Painlevé

November 1 6:30 pm - 9:00 pm

Our screening of selected films from Painlevé’s short, surreal, scientific nature films will focus on his depiction of the underwater world.  Known for his innovations in underwater photography film, Painlevé’s eccentric take on nature film shows us just how experimental the early attempts of capturing the strange lifeforms of the sea could be.  (Screened in French with English subtitles)

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“Bride of Frankenstein” and “Olympia”

November 1 7:30 pm - 9:30 pm

Film Studies 119/319 “Synthetic Humans” presents the classic films Bride of Frankenstein and “Olympia” (from Tales of Hoffmann) as part of the Frankenstein@200 Film Festival.

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Chuck Klosterman and Simon Reynolds

November 1 7:30 pm - 9:00 pm

Best-selling writer Chuck Klosterman (But What If We’re Wrong: Thinking about the Present as If It Were the Past) and Pitchfork music critic Simon Reynolds (Retromania: Pop Culture’s Addiction to Its Own Past) discuss how nostalgia drives pop culture and the music industry and what that means for the way that we look at ourselves. Can indulging “retro” pleasures be productive, or are we stuck in a groove?

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Community-Engaged Research Mini-Conference

November 2 11:30 am - 3:30 pm

The Haas Center for Public Service and the Center for the Comparative Studies in Race & Ethnicity invite you to a Community-Based Research Mini-Conference. Undergraduates from the Haas Center’s and CCRSE’s Community-based Research fellowship programs will present their summer research projects conducted in collaboration with community partners and addressing community-identified issues and needs. A light lunch will be served. Come learn more about community-based research projects and exciting undergradaute summer opportunities! For more information contact Clayton Hurd (clayton.hurd@stanford.edu) or Rigoberto…

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Lead the Nation from Sacramento: Find Jobs in State Government

November 2 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Looking for job experience that combines your passions – from public health to the environment – and your love for the Golden State? Learn about career, fellowship, and internship opportunities in state government from some of Sacramento’s public policy superstars. CREAM will be served to those who RSVP. Panelists: Kiyomi Burchill, Deputy Secretary at California Health and Human Services Emilio Camacho, Chief of Staff for Commissioner David Hochschild at California Energy Commission Akua Adeneke McLeod, Summer 2017 SIG Fellow at…

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Reclaiming Public Space and the City

November 2 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

Luka Knežević Strika is a photographer and activist from Belgrade, Serbia. He will talk about a movement formed at the periphery of the EU, in a city whose people are disillusioned with politics and revolutions. Something changed when a group of architects, artists and other citizens decided to say no to the Belgrade Waterfront, a large public-private development project pushed through using shady legislative tactics and illegal actions. From obscurity and a marginal position the critics of the project put the…

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In Conversation: Jed Perl with Alexander S. C. Rower

November 2 6:00 pm - 7:00 pm

Jed Perl, art critic and writer, discusses his new book Calder: The Conquest of Time: The Early Years: 1898 – 1940 with Alexander S. C. Rower, President of the Calder Foundation. Perl’s book is the first ever biography of Alexander Calder, the acclaimed twentieth-century sculptor. This program is presented in collaboration with PACE Palo Alto. Books will be available for purchase. This program is free and open to the public, but seating is limited and registration is required.

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Jenny Q Chai

November 2 7:30 pm - 9:00 pm

Please join us for an evening of multimedia works for piano, electronics, and video with Jenny Q Chai. An artist of singular vision, pianist Jenny Q Chai is widely renowned for her ability to illuminate musical connections throughout the centuries. With radical joie de vivre and razor-sharp intention, Chai creates layered multimedia programs and events which explore and unite elements of science, nature, fashion, and art. “Jenny Q Chai, who has studied with Pierre-Laurent Aimard, is following the more eclectic path…” – New…

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A Celebration of the Life and Poetry of Denise Levertov

November 2 7:30 pm - 9:00 pm

Denise Levertov was one of the most distinguished and engaging poets of the 20th century. Her work is characterized by moral courage, passionate imagination, exquisite craftsmanship, and unpretentious accessibility. Stanford was fortunate to have Levertov on the faculty for a number of years, and her influence on poets throughout the Bay Area has been indelible.  Early in her career, through her friendships with Robert Creeley and Robert Duncan, she became associated with the so-called Black Mountain School, experimenting in what…

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CBD 2017: Carillon Concert and Quiet Contemplation

November 3 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm

SAVE THE DATE – Carillon Concert and Quiet Contemplation – Friday, November 3rd. The Hoover carillon bells ring again this year to signal the university’s commitment to emotional well-being. All members of the Stanford community are encouraged to pause, reflect and take time to unwind. Gather in Dorhmann Grove, the Oval Ear and/or Meyer Green Lawn to share the concert and contemplative pause together as a community. You may also enjoy the experience by pausing wherever you are on or off…

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Stanford Powwow Planning Committee Meeting

November 3 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm

Bozhoooo!  Hi Friends! As Co-Chairs for the 2018 Annual Stanford Powwow, we’re excited to begin planning.  For anybody new to Stanford Powwow, it is the largest student-run powwow in the nation and we need YOUR help to make it happen. Our first meeting was October 5.  This second meeting (Friday, November 3) will be followed by a Work Day on Saturday, November 4 so that the subcommittees can inventory and reorganize their tools, equipment and documents~

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A Reading with Writer & Activist Sarah Schulman

November 3 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Prolific author, critic, and LGBTQ activist Sarah Schulman’s passionate and witty work has explored forces of cultural erasure—from misogyny and the AIDS epidemic, to gentrification and nostalgia. She reads from her recent book Conflict Is Not Abuse: Overstating Harm, Community Responsibility, and the Duty of Repair. Later that night, Schulman joins performance artist Penny Arcade for a post-show conversation following Longing Lasts Longer in the Bing Concert Hall Studio at 7:30pm. Tickets available at live.stanford.edu.

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CBD 2017: The Hidden Life of Trees: Book discussion on nature and interconnectedness

November 3 5:30 pm - 6:45 pm

The Hidden Life of Trees illustrates in vivid ways how trees in the forest are social beings. Join us as we use the book as a starting point to open up discussion about how trees interact with each other in similar ways to human beings, exploring and cultivating appreciation for the uncanny parallels between our lives and theirs. NOTE: Feel free to join us even if you have not finished the book. Facilitator: Sairus Patel is co-editor of Trees of…

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Longing Lasts Longer

November 3 8:00 pm - 9:30 pm

Penny Arcade’s hilariously iconoclastic monologue, created by one of Andy Warhol’s underground superstars, addresses perennially political issues of class and gender and everyday woes like gentrification. To Arcade (née Susana Ventura), the Big Apple has become the Big Cupcake: a New York City of fluff, with no affordable places for artists and no place to buy a broom or get your shoes repaired or your clothes washed. Sound close to home? Recommended for mature audiences

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CBD 2017: The Hidden Life of Trees: Book discussion on nature and interconnectedness

November 4 5:15 pm - 6:30 pm

The Hidden Life of Trees illustrates in vivid ways how trees in the forest are social beings. Join us as we use the book as a starting point to open up discussion about how trees interact with each other in similar ways to human beings, exploring and cultivating appreciation for the uncanny parallels between our lives and theirs. NOTE: Feel free to join us even if you have not finished the book. Facilitator: Sairus Patel is co-editor of Trees of…

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Shenson Recital Series: Naomi Louisa O’Connell, mezzo-soprano, and Brent Funderburk, piano – “Words to Love and Live By”

November 5 2:30 pm - 4:00 pm

Program: Zilcher, Honegger, Copland, Wolf, Ives, and Bolcom Naomi Louisa O’Connell, mezzo-soprano, has performed at Marlboro Music; Steans Musical Institute, Ravinia; Rockport Chamber Music Festival; MUSE/IQUE, Los Angeles; New York’s Five Boroughs Music Festival; Fabbri Chamber Concerts; The Song Continues; Ensemble for the Romantic Century; Juilliard ChamberFest; FOCUS!; and New York Festival of Song. 

Ms. O’Connell is currently based in New York City, where she lives with her husband. Brent Funderburk, piano, has partnered with world-class singers and instrumentalists in concert and on recording. He has…

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CBD 2017: Tea Ceremony: An experiential contemplative practice

November 5 2:30 pm - 4:30 pm

Enjoy the tranquility of the tea-brewing process and appreciate the history of Chinese tea ceremonies in this culturally rooted contemplative practice. Attendees will learn about the origins and related cultural activities of the Chinese tea ceremony, then participate in a ceremony themselves alongside a host. Learn how the simple act of making tea can become an experience of shared presence, relaxation, and honoring of tradition. The ceremony will also feature a contemplative performance from the Stanford Chinese Music Ensemble. Chairs…

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Sundays with the St. Lawrence

November 5 2:30 pm - 4:30 pm

The quartet, which has in the past featured immersive encounters with the music of Franz Joseph Haydn, holds an all-Haydn “Bing-fest” with all six of his Opus 20 string quartets—quite a feat. 

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CBD 2017: The Hidden Life of Trees: Book discussion on nature and interconnectedness

November 5 5:15 pm - 6:30 pm

The Hidden Life of Trees illustrates in vivid ways how trees in the forest are social beings. Join us as we use the book as a starting point to open up discussion about how trees interact with each other in similar ways to human beings, exploring and cultivating appreciation for the uncanny parallels between our lives and theirs. NOTE: Feel free to join us even if you have not finished the book. Facilitator: Sairus Patel is co-editor of Trees of…

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Compline: An Evening Service of Song

November 5 9:00 pm - 9:30 pm

Compline (pronounced “komp-lin”) A reflective, contemplative 30-minute service of hymns, anthems and chant sung by Stanford and local choral ensembles in the tranquil candlelit ambiance of Memorial Church. All are welcome. Sundays, 9:00 – 9:30 pm (during the academic year with the exception of university holidays and academic breaks) in Memorial Church. All Saints Episcopal will be performing this evening. 

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CBD 2017: Using Stories to Deepen Your Presence to Life

November 6 12:30 pm - 1:45 pm

Like meditation, stories and storytelling have long been a vehicle for creating greater presence to ourselves, others, and our world. In this workshop, you will explore how to turn your encounters with stories into contemplative practices, with many of the same benefits of mindfulness and compassion practices. Join us to experience how to use stories and storytelling to reflect deeply and create more intimacy in all of your relationships. Instructor: Jonah Willihnganz, MFA, PhD, has taught literature and writing at…

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Physical Theater Workshop with Naomi Louisa O’Connell and Matthew Chapman

November 6 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

This Physical Theater Workshop for Stanford students with Naomi Louisa O’Connell (soprano) and Matthew Chapman (Stanford faculty, TAPS) is free and open to the public.

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Adam Elsheimer and the Character of Nature | Julian Bell

November 6 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

Between his arrival in Rome in 1600 and his death there, aged 32, ten years later, Adam Elsheimer of Frankfurt created a succession of minute but seminal paintings. Artists ranging from Rubens and Rembrandt to Claude Lorrain and even to the Mughal court were affected by the pictorial poetry of Elsheimer’s narrative scenes. Julian Bell will examine the imaginative matrix of this oeuvre, formed in the era of Caravaggio and Galileo, and will argue that Elsheimer’s vision illumines the broader…

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Race, Politics, and Culture in the Age of New Media feat. Damon Young and Panama Jackson of Very Smart Brothas

November 6 7:00 pm - 8:30 pm

Lauded by the Washington Post for their “quick takes on pop and political culture,” Damon Young and Panama Jackson join us for an interactive public conversation on race, politics, media and contemporary culture.  This is the second installment of our Race Rights and Resistance series.

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CBD 2017: Walking Meditation and Contemplation of Memorial Church Inscriptions

November 7 12:00 pm - 1:15 pm

Join us in the awe-inspiring tranquility of Memorial Church for a walking meditation. The event will be centered on the inscriptions carved in the sandstone interior walls of this beautiful sacred space. Assembled by Jane Stanford, these inscriptions represent a collection of instructive and inspirational quotes to nourish the soul and spirit. Facilitators: The Rev. Joanne Sanders, D.Min, Associate Dean for Religious Life at Stanford, preaches and presides regularly at services in Memorial Church. She has brought contemplative practices such…

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History Changes Gears: The Russian Revolution of 1917—A Centennial Lecture

November 7 7:30 pm - 9:00 pm

The centennial of the Russian Revolution of 1917 serves as the occasion for this lecture, which will recount the broad sweep of events that led to the downfall of the Russian autocracy in the February Revolution and then, eight months later, the storming to power of the Bolshevik Party in the name of the Soviets—an event once celebrated as the Great October Socialist Revolution. The lecture will assess the role of individual actors on the scene, from the last Romanov…

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The 5th Element: The Future and Promise of Hip Hop Pedagogy

November 8 8:00 am - 7:00 pm

This convening is designed for hip hop educators, community arts advocates, teaching artists, and those interested in the liberatory possibilities of hip hop pedagogies. It will feature: A keynote by South African hip hop pioneer and educator Emile YX (Heal the Hood Project/Black Noise) A panel featuring H. Samy Alim, Casey Wong, the Mural Music and Arts Project, and East Palo Alto Academy High School A panel on hip hop feminist pedagogies featuring Joan Morgan  Workshop sessions led by leading…

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Gallery Talk: Rodin: Shock of the Modern Body

November 8 12:00 pm - 12:30 pm

Please join Melissa A. Yuen, Curatorial Fellow for American and European Art to 1900, for an introduction to Rodin: Shock of the Modern Body. At the time of his death, Auguste Rodin (France, 1840-1917) was counted among the most renowned artists in the world. A century later, after numerous reassessments by generations of art historians, Rodin continues to be recognized for making figurative sculpture modern by redefining the expressive capacity of the human form. This installation spans three galleries and features…

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CBD 2017: What Makes Living Things Tick, The Restless Clock

November 8 12:30 pm - 1:30 pm

Ever since the beginnings of modern science in the 17th century, philosophers and scientists have used clockwork as a metaphor to describe the universe and the natural world. Clockwork generally makes one think of something rigid, rote, constrained, something that ticks along without changing. However, hidden within this centuries-old clockwork metaphor is a tradition of people who have understood clocks, and nature, very differently: as restless, responsive, and dynamic. These renegades include the German philosopher Leibniz who first described living…

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Gallery Talk: In Dialogue: African Arts

November 8 2:00 pm - 2:30 pm

Amanda M. Maples, Curatorial Fellow for African and Indigenous American Art, discusses In Dialogue: African Arts. In Dialogue represents the vibrant and dynamic arts of the continent and its diasporas. Drawing primarily from the Cantor’s own collection, it considers the arts of Africa to be rooted in a deep and rich history that is locally, as much as globally, connected. The exhibition will prompt the viewer, both new to and familiar with African arts, to wonder — who, where, when, why and even…

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Film Screening: Song of Lahore

November 8 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm

With its ancient palaces and stately gardens, the Lahore of Pakistan’s 1947 independence was a haven and a muse for musicians, artists, and poets. The city came alive to the beat of a tabla drum; with a musical culture passed down over centuries and a thriving film industry, opportunities were great for the legion of musicians that called Lahore home. This 2015 documentary, directed by Stanford alums Sharmeen Obaid-Chinoy and Andy Schocken, tells the story of a group of musicians…

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Transcendance: Feeling New Strength

November 8 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm

The Pegasus Physician Writers will recite ekphrastic poetry accompanied by the famed St. Lawrence String Quartet, who will be performing Ludwig van Beethoven’s String Quartet No. 15, In a Moll, Opus 132. 

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DLCL Fall Film Series: Dog Lady (2015) Verónica Llinás

November 8 6:30 pm - 9:00 pm

Dog Lady (La Mujer de los perros) looks at the daily life of a homeless women living on the margins of society with a pack of dogs.  Verónica Llinás wrote, directed, and acted in this film that examines the borders where society and nature meet, how we define wildness and wilderness, and what encounters with canine companion species can teach us about what it means to be human.  (Screened in Spanish with English subtitles)

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CBD 2017: Keynote with Alice Walker – Taking the Arrow Out of the Heart: Noticing where you are, and who or what is there with you

November 8 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm

Tickets for this Contemplation By Design keynote event are available through the Stanford Ticketing Office starting Tuesday, September 12th at 9:00am by clicking HERE. (Registration for all other Contemplation By Design Summit sessions is available at: contemplation.stanford.edu/summit.php  The summit is November 1-9, 2017.) “No one escapes a time in life when the arrow of sorrow, of anger, of despair pierces the heart. For many of us, there is the inevitable need to circle the wound. It is often such a surprise to find it…

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Stanford Jazz Orchestra with special guest Alan Ferber, trombone

November 8 7:30 pm - 9:00 pm

The Stanford Jazz Orchestra welcomes its new director, Michael Galisatus. The Jazz Orchestra’s Fall program features trombonist and composer Alan Ferber. Mr. Galisatus, currently Director of Bands at the College of San Mateo, also directs the Miles Ahead Big Band for Stanford Jazz Workshop. Grammy-nominated trombonist-composer Alan Ferber has been called “one of the jazz world’s premier composers and arrangers for larger groups” by All About Jazz NY. Jazz Times magazine describes Ferber’s compositions as “inspired and meticulous.” For the last six years, he…

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“My Fair Lady”

November 8 7:30 pm - 10:30 pm

Film Studies 119/319 “Synthetic Humans” presents the classic film My Fair Lady as part of the Frankenstein@200 Film Festival.

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CBD 2017: Contemplative Concert in Bing Concert Hall

November 9 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm

Through music, dance and song, experience PEACE: Pause, Exhale, Attend mindfully, Connect with nature/yourself/others and Express. The concert includes performances by the St. Lawrence String Quartet, Stanford Symphony Orchestra, pianist Eric Tuan, baritone Steve Goodman, original choreography by Diane Frank, and Bent Spoon Dance Company. Faculty and Staff will earn a BeWell berry by attending this concert.

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Stanford Colloquium on Dance Studies lecture with Douglas Rosenberg, “Hiding in Plain Site: Screendance Histories and the Expanded Imagination”

November 9 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

The Stanford Colloquium on Dance Studies is excited to present: “Hiding in Plain Site: Screendance Histories and the Expanded Imagination” A lecture by Douglas Rosenberg Professor and Chair of the Art Department, University of Wisconsin-Madison Discussants Usha Iyer, Stanford University Sima Belmar, University of California, Berkeley Thursday, November 9, 2017 5:30pm – 7:00pm Followed by a reception Oshman Hall in McMurtry Building, Stanford University Free & Open to the Public In a seminal essay “Video Space: A Site For Choreography,” first…

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Art Practice Talk Series: Josephine Taylor Tobin

November 9 6:00 pm - 7:00 pm

The Art Practice Talk Series features faculty from the Department of Art & Art History who talk about their own studio and artistic practice. The 2017 – 2018 speakers include Josephine Taylor (November 9, 2017), Jonathan Calm (March 8, 2018) and Terry Berlier (April 5, 2018). Josephine Taylor studied Religion and East Indian Languages at the University of Colorado before pursuing a graduate degree in Fine Art at the San Francisco Art Institute. She has been a Visiting Lecturer at University of California…

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Chartreuse

November 9 7:30 pm - 9:00 pm

Chartreuse is violinist Myra Hinrichs (Chicago), violist Carrie Frey (New York City), and cellist Helen Newby (San Francisco). The tricoastal trio aims to take advantage of the distance by pooling the strengths of their chosen cities, commissioning new works from composers across the U.S. and in Norway and collaborating with fellow performers in each of their musical residences on “Chartreuse +/-” projects. The trio has toured extensively in the Northeast, the Midwest, and California, as well as in Norway.  Uniquely…

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“Daihannya Tendoku-e” Performed by Karyōbinga Shōmyō Kenkyūkai

November 10 7:00 pm - 8:30 pm

Kashōken, an internationally renowned ensemble of Japanese Shingon priests, will perform a Daihannya Tendoku, a “rolling reading” of the Great Sutra on the Perfection of Wisdom (Mahāprajñāpāramitā sūtra) at the Memorial Church of Stanford University. The Daihannya Tendoku is one of the most important rituals of Japanese Buddhism. It features the Great Sutra on the Perfection of Wisdom, one of the central texts of Mahayana Buddhism, and with 600 fascicles also the longest text in the Buddhist canon. Since the…

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Stanford Wind Symphony: Fall Concert

November 10 7:30 pm - 9:00 pm

Giancarlo Aquilanti directs the Wind Symphony’s program. Giancarlo Aquilanti: Camminando per le Strade di Staffolo (March)Frank Ticheli: VesuviusJohn Mackey: Aurora Awakes, conducted by Cody StockerOliver Waespi: Il CanticoDavid Maslanka: Give us This Day – Short Symphony for Wind Ensemble

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In Conversation with Samantha Bee

November 10 7:30 pm - 9:00 pm

Meet America’s Canadian sweetheart, the only female comic to host her own network late-night show. Bee, a Canadian who learned her craft as a correspondent on The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, has become a sharp political commentator with a ribald voice that never loses its charm or its funny. NOTE: This event has been rescheduled from October 6 and is currently at capacity. Please sign up for the notification list to receive any ticketing and event updates.

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Ani Choying Drolma: “Buddhist Chants and Songs”

November 11 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm

Choying Drolma was born in Kathmandu, Nepal to Tibetan refugee parents in 1971. Her education and spiritual training were supervised by the renowned meditation master, Tulku Urgyen Rinpoche. She was well-trained in Buddhist meditation, chants, rituals and ceremonies performance, and was quickly advanced to the position of chanting master in the nunnery. Her singing talent was first discovered by the famous American guitarist Steve Tibbetts, during his visit to Nagi Gompa. Thanks to Steve Tibbett’s effort, Ani Choying Drolma’s first…

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Jason Moran

November 11 7:30 pm - 9:30 pm

Jazz virtuoso Jason Moran, winner of a MacArthur “Genius” award and currently the Kennedy Center’s artistic director for jazz, took up piano because of Thelonious Monk. Moran, who is reimagining Monk’s historic 1959 Town Hall concert at the Bing, says Monk is “the most important musician, period. In all the world, period.” In this centenary year of Monk’s birth, Moran evokes the concert’s breakaway excitement via an in-depth media show, and with his 10-piece Big Bandwagon he explores Monk’s roots…

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Patricia Barber Trio

November 11 8:00 pm - 9:00 pm

The resident jazz pianist and vocalist from Chicago’s legendary Green Mill brings her trio to the Bing Studio. Possessed of a supple, hauntingly evocative voice and an expressive, idiosyncratic piano style, Barber draws the listener into her unique musical world. Add to that a keen ear for melody and a poet’s way with wordplay, and rarely have so many musical gifts found expression in a single soul.

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Second Sunday: Family Day

November 12 11:00 am - 4:00 pm

SECOND SUNDAY is a free, family-focused day of art talks, hands-on art making, and gallery adventures for visitors of all ages. Registration is not required and families can tailor their museum experience based on their schedule and the activities that interest them most. CANTOR & ANDERSON Drop-in Studio: Experiment with art materials and new techniques by participating in a hands-on art making experience. All visitors, regardless of age, ability, or familiarity with the creative process, are encouraged to participate. Art Packs: Check out an…

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Stanford Philharmonia

November 12 2:30 pm - 4:30 pm

The Stanford Philharmonia presents the West Coast premiere of new music by Anthony Burgess, the British composer-novelist best known as the author of A Clockwork Orange. 2017 marks the centenary of Burgess (1917-1993), who composed Petite Symphonie pour Strasbourg in 1988 to celebrate the 2000th anniversary of the founding of Strasbourg in 12 B.C. Stanford faculty violinist Owen Dalby and his wife, violist Meena Bhasin, perform Mozart’s great Sinfonia Concertante in E-flat Major, K. 364, with Schubert’s Symphony No. 6…

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Compline: An Evening Service of Song

November 12 9:00 pm - 9:30 pm

Compline (pronounced “komp-lin”) A reflective, contemplative 30-minute service of hymns, anthems and chant sung by Stanford and local choral ensembles in the tranquil candlelit ambiance of Memorial Church. All are welcome. Sundays, 9:00 – 9:30 pm (during the academic year with the exception of university holidays and academic breaks) in Memorial Church. Trinity Lutheran will be performing this evening. 

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Silicon Valley in American History

November 13 4:30 pm - 6:30 pm

Join us for a discussion on Silicon Valley in American History with David M. Kennedy, the Donald J. McLachlan Professor of History, Emeritus, and Leslie Berlin, Project Historian for the Silicon Valley Archives at Stanford. Featuring the launch of Berlin’s latest book, Troublemakers: Silicon Valley’s Coming of Age. —————————————————-About Troublemakers:The richly told narrative of the Silicon Valley generation that launched five major high-tech industries in seven years, laying the foundation for today’s technology-driven world. At a time when the five most valuable companies…

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The Age of Irreverence: A New History of Laughter in China

November 13 4:30 pm - 5:30 pm

This event is for current Stanford students and faculty only. About the talk: China’s entry in to modernity was not just traumatic, but uproarious. As the Qing last dynasty fell, prominent writers compiled jokes to form collections called “histories of laughter.” In the first years of the republic, novelists, essayists, and illustrators used humorous allegories to make veiled critiques of the new government. Yet political and cultural discussion repeatedly erupted into invective, with critics gleefully jeering rivals in public. Farceurs…

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Building a Shared Urban Future: From Creative Democracy to Participatory Planning

November 13 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

With rapid changes in cities across the world, citizens are demanding and expecting new ways of engaging with their urban environments. This special evening panel will bring together interdisciplinary perspectives from design, public policy, and the arts to explore theories and framing of citizen participation and new possibilities for engaging the urban populace. From topics of creative democracy in public policy, participatory planning in public housing, to maker activities in public spaces, how might we build a stronger shared urban…

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World of Thieves: A Global History of the Chinese Swindle Story

November 14 4:30 pm - 6:00 pm

Please RSVP here.  Free and open to the public. About the talk: Why do collections of swindle stories appear at certain times and places? In China, for example, the swindle story has experienced bursts of popularity during the late Ming, the early Republican era, the early Mao era, and during the last 20 years. And comparable works exist around the world. What, for example, do Zhang Yingyu’s Book of Swindles (Ming China, 1617), Richard King’s The New Cheats of London…

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Launch Your Social Impact Career with a Post-Graduate Fellowship (Info Session #4)

November 14 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm

Attention Seniors! Passionate about serving in the public interest? Don’t have plans for next year? Explore our post-graduate fellowships: funded full-time opportunities to work with a mentor in a public mission-driven organization of your choosing. Come to our informational session to learn about former Fellows’ experiences and get insider tips on the application process.

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Gallery Talk: In Dialogue: African Arts

November 15 12:00 pm - 12:30 pm

Amanda M. Maples, Curatorial Fellow for African and Indigenous American Art, discusses Uwa by El Anatsui. In Dialogue represents the vibrant and dynamic arts of the continent and its diasporas. Drawing primarily from the Cantor’s own collection, it considers the arts of Africa to be rooted in a deep and rich history that is locally, as much as globally, connected. The exhibition will prompt the viewer, both new to and familiar with African arts, to wonder — who, where, when, why and even what is…

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NOON CONCERT: Harpsichord Studio of Elaine Thornburgh

November 15 12:30 pm - 1:30 pm

Harpsichord students of Elaine Thornburgh will be featured in this noontime recital. (Program TBA.) 

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Stanford University Press: Celebrating 125 Years of Publishing

November 15 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm

Speaker: Alan Harvey, Director, Stanford University Press

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Borders & Borderlands: An American Studies Read-In & Open Mic Event

November 15 5:15 pm - 7:15 pm

American Studies invites students from across the university to share experiences, share perspectives, share insights at Borders & Borderlands An American Studies Read-in and Open Mic Event Part of the American Studies Program’s year-long event series, Borderlands Now, inspired by the 30th anniversary of Gloria Anzaldúa’s Borderlands/La Frontera: The New Mestiza. Read a favorite passage from Gloria Anzaldúa’s Borderlands/La Frontera: The New Mestiza. Read an essay about your response to Anzaldúa’s work. Tell a story about how questions of borders…

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DLCL Fall Film Series Screening: Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives (2010) Apichatpong Weerasethakul

November 15 6:30 pm - 9:00 pm

The Palme d’or winning film Uncle Boonmee by Apichatpong Weerasethakul considers a dying man’s reflections on reincarnation, therefore offering an interesting perspective for our discussion of the relationships between the human and the non-human, the present anxieties of the Anthropocene, and the future of man’s impact on the natural world.  Recalling his past lives with the reincarnated figures of his wife and son, Uncle Boonmee invites viewers on a spiritual journey into the jungle and an unexpected exploration of memory…

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“Die Puppe” and “Making Mr. Right”

November 15 7:30 pm - 10:30 pm

Film Studies 119/319 “Synthetic Humans” presents the films Die Puppe and Making Mr. Right as part of the Frankenstein@200 Film Festival.

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Stanford Chamber Chorale: The Wisdom of the Moon

November 15 7:30 pm - 9:00 pm

The Chamber Chorale, directed by Stephen Sano, opens its 2017-18 season with a richly varied recital of a cappella literature from the American and European choral traditions, performed in the stunning acoustic of Stanford Memorial Church. Featured will be a triptych of evocative settings about the moon by Winges, Chilcott, and LaBarr, juxtaposed with paired settings of the Ubi caritas and Cantate Domino texts by Duruflé, Monteverdi, Jackson, Rutter, Elberdin, and others. Also included will be gems we’ll be preparing for our Pacific Northwest tour later in the academic…

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Song of Lahore

November 15 7:30 pm - 9:30 pm

The Golden Era of “Lollywood” in Lahore, Pakistan, peaked in the 1960s and 70s, until the enforcement of Islamic Sharia law in 1977 led to a steep decline in the arts. As work dried up for studio musicians, producer Izzat Majeed secretly gathered these intrepid players at his Sachal Studios, where they recorded a hit version of Dave Brubeck’s iconic “Take Five”—with a South Asian twist. Wynton Marsalis invited the Sachal Ensemble to perform with his Jazz at Lincoln Center…

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The Daisy Theatre

November 15 8:00 pm - 10:00 pm

Don’t bring the kiddies to puppeteer Ronnie Burkett’s rather ribald, thoroughly entertaining Daisy Theatre. Burkett, who hails from Alberta, Canada, became interested in puppets as a child, when he picked up Volume P of the World Book and it fell open at “puppets.” Burkett is a one-man show, improvising on the spot. His marionettes—a rotating cast of 40 characters—include ventriloquist Meyer Lemon, actress Lillian Lunkhead, and Edna Rural. Advisory: chance of puppet nudity. Recommended for mature audiences

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Talking about a Revolution: Gallery Talk Series

November 16 12:00 pm - 12:30 pm

An Introduction to The Crown under the Hammer: Russia, Romanovs, Revolution  This gallery talk with Jodi Roberts, Robert M. and Ruth L. Halperin Curator for Modern and Contemporary Art, Cantor Arts Center, is an introduction to The Crown under the Hammer: Russia, Romanovs, Revolution  MORE TALKS IN THIS SERIES: OCTOBER 19, 12PM, An introduction to The Crown under the Hammer: Russia, Romanovs, Revolution with Jodi Roberts, Robert M. and Ruth L. Halperin Curator for Modern and Contemporary Art, Cantor Arts Center OCTOBER 21, 1PM, Russia’s Crown under Armand…

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Gallery Talk: Rodin: Shock of the Modern Body

November 16 2:00 pm - 2:30 pm

Please join Melissa A. Yuen, Curatorial Fellow for American and European Art to 1900, for an introduction to Rodin: Shock of the Modern Body. At the time of his death, Auguste Rodin (France, 1840-1917) was counted among the most renowned artists in the world. A century later, after numerous reassessments by generations of art historians, Rodin continues to be recognized for making figurative sculpture modern by redefining the expressive capacity of the human form. This installation spans three galleries and features…

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Serve a Year, Fulfill a Mission: Service Year Programs

November 16 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Interested in education, the environment, disaster relief, health care, or any other imaginable pressing world issue? Consider taking a service year to help leading organizations achieve their missions. Service Year Alliance CEO Shirley Sagawa, along with representatives from a variety of service year programs, will share opportunities to spend a year doing meaningful work alongside diverse, driven people. CREAM will be served to those who RSVP.

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Studio Lecture Series: Nicola López

November 16 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

Human-built Structures: Giants, Hybrids and (Un)Natural Systems Born in Santa Fe, NM, Nicola López lives and works in Brooklyn and teaches at Columbia University in New York City.  Through her work in installation, drawing and printmaking, López describes and reconfigures our contemporary—primarily urban—landscape.  Her focus on describing ‘place’ stems from an interest in urban planning, architecture and anthropology and it has been fueled by time spent working and traveling in different landscapes.  López has received support for her work through…

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NOON CONCERT: Voice Students of Claire Giovannetti

November 17 12:30 pm - 1:30 pm

Voice students are featured in this noontime concert.

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10th Annual Bita Prize for Persian Arts: Marjane Satrapi

November 17 6:30 pm - 8:00 pm

Marjane Satrapi: Facts and Fictions of Women, Exile, and Identity We are very pleased to announce that the recipient of the Tenth Bita Prize for Persian Arts is Ms. Marjane Satrapi. She is the author of Persepolis, Persepolis 2, Embroideries, Chicken with Plums, and several children’s books. She co-wrote and co-directed the animated feature film version of Persepolis, which was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Animated Feature. She regularly contributes to magazines and newspapers throughout the world. The annual Bita…

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Peninsula Symphony with Stanford Symphonic Chorus: 25th Anniversary Stanford Concert – NEW DATE!

November 17 7:30 pm - 9:30 pm

The festive annual collaboration between the Stanford Symphonic Chorus and the Peninsula Symphony reaches its 25th Anniversary in an all-English program of grand and gorgeous music by Ralph Vaughan Williams and Edward Elgar, directed by Mitchell Sardou Klein and Stephen M. Sano. Program Ralph Vaughan Williams: Norfolk Rhapsody No. 1 Ralph Vaughan Williams: Fantasia on a Theme by Thomas Tallis Edward Elgar: The Music Makers, Op. 6with Wendy Hillhouse, mezzo-soprano Note: The previously announced date for this event, November 11, was incorrect.

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Peninsula Symphony with Stanford Symphonic Chorus: 25th Anniversary Stanford Concert

November 19 2:30 pm - 4:30 pm

The festive annual collaboration between the Stanford Symphonic Chorus and the Peninsula Symphony reaches its 25th Anniversary in an all-English program of grand and gorgeous music by Ralph Vaughan Williams and Edward Elgar, directed by Mitchell Sardou Klein and Stephen M. Sano. Program Ralph Vaughan Williams: Norfolk Rhapsody No. 1 Ralph Vaughan Williams: Fantasia on a Theme by Thomas Tallis Edward Elgar: The Music Makers, Op. 6with Wendy Hillhouse, mezzo-soprano

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How to Write Epic Fellowship Applications (Workshop #1)

November 28 5:30 pm - 6:30 pm

Join Hume Writing Center staff at the Haas Center for an evening of brainstorming and essay drafting. A great cure for writer’s block, this workshop will help you develop pages of ideas, a new set of writing tools, and the redefined focus and perspective you need to write a personal statement and essays for Post-Graduate Fellowship and Cardinal Quarter applications.

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Séverine Ballon, cello: Works for cello and multichannel electronics – NEW DATE!

November 28 7:30 pm - 9:00 pm

Séverine Ballon‘s work focuses on regular performance of key works of the cello repertoire, as well as numerous collaborations with composers; in addition, her researches as an improviser have helped her to extend the sonic and technical resources of her instrument. She studied the cello at the Hochschule für Musik in Berlin and in Lübeck with Joseph Schwab and Troels Svane. During 2004-05, she was an academist at the Ensemble Modern (Internationale Ensemble Modern Akademie). She perfected her contemporary cello…

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NOON CONCERT: Flute Students of Greer Ellison

November 29 12:30 pm - 1:30 pm

Flute students are featured in this noontime concert. (Program TBA.) 

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DLCL Fall Film Series: Thin Red Line (1998) Terrence Malick

November 29 6:30 pm - 9:00 pm

Malick’s Thin Red Line pushes the concept of a nature film to its limits, as we explore the role of nature in the story of the Battle of Mount Austen in the Pacific Theater of World War II, originally written by James Jones.  With an all-star cast and lush scenery, Malick explores the deep resonances between the beauty of the Pacific, the intense subjectivity of battle, and the collective experience of an environment transformed by war.

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Victoria Hanna

November 29 7:00 pm - 8:30 pm

Jerusalem-based Victoria Hanna is known for mesmerizing interpretations of traditional Jewish texts (both Hebrew and Aramaic) that combine traditional Middle Eastern sounds with contemporary genres, such as rap and hip-hop. But it was her first official video single, “Aleph-Bet,” that garnered more than 68,000 views in the first week, signaling that her unique, experimental sound is perhaps going more mainstream. In the Bing Studio, she performs her existing repertoire and new work she is developing at the Magnes Collection of…

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University Singers

November 29 7:30 pm - 9:00 pm

Robert Huw Morgan directs the University Singer’s program in Bing Concert Hall. (Program TBA)

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“Her”

November 29 7:30 pm - 9:45 pm

Film Studies 119/319 “Synthetic Humans” presents the critically acclaimed film Her as part of the Frankenstein@200 Film Festival.

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The Evasive Bodies of May’s Photo Studio: Images from Chinatown

November 30 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

Join us for a lecture presented by Professor Marci Kwon (Art & Art History) as part of the Bill Lane Center for the American West’s ArtsWest series. As described by Professor Kwon, “This lecture will explore the remarkable body of photographs produced by May’s Photo Studio, the first Chinese-run photography studio in San Francisco’s Chinatown. From its opening in 1923 until the mid-1960s, wife-and-husband Isabella May Lee and Leo Chan documented weddings, special events, Cantonese opera productions, and even produced erotic photographs for Chinese…

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The Wise Women – Free preview for Stanford students, staff, and faculty

November 30 7:30 pm - 8:30 pm

Conrad Susa’s The Wise Women (A Christmas Mystery Fable) explores the Nativity story through the perspective of Three Wise Women. Left behind while the Wise Men journey with the guidance of the Star of Bethlehem, the Wise Women instead experience a shared vision of the Holy Mother and Child. Susa’s one-act church opera premiered in 1994; the libretto is by Philip Littell. Students from the Department of Music, as well as faculty, staff, and community members, perform The Wise Women in the glorious…

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December 2017

Face/Interface: Type Design and Human-Computer Interaction Beyond the Western World

December 1 9:00 am - 5:30 pm

In connection with the 2017-18 Stanford University Libraries exhibition, “Facing the World: Type Design in Global Perspective,” this international conference brings together scholars, designers, engineers, and technologists to explore Non-Latin type design, book design, interface design, and human-computer interaction beyond the Latin alphabetic world. SCHEDULE* *Subject to Change FRIDAY DECEMBER 1, 2017 9:00-9:30: WELCOME Thomas S. Mullaney (Stanford University)Opening Remarks and Logistics 9:30-11:00 Fiona Ross, “Informing and Inspiring Non-Latin Type Design through Collections-based Research – with particular focus on South…

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NOON CONCERT: Piano Studio of George Barth and Kumaran Arul

December 1 12:30 pm - 1:30 pm

Piano students of George Barth and Kumaran Arul will be featured in this noontime recital. (Program TBA.) 

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The Wise Women

December 1 7:30 pm - 9:00 pm

Conrad Susa’s The Wise Women (A Christmas Mystery Fable) explores the Nativity story through the perspective of Three Wise Women. Left behind while the Wise Men journey with the guidance of the Star of Bethlehem, the Wise Women instead experience a shared vision of the Holy Mother and Child. Susa’s one-act church opera premiered in 1994; the libretto is by Philip Littell. Students from the Department of Music, as well as faculty, staff, and community members, perform The Wise Women in the glorious…

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Stanford Symphony Orchestra

December 1 7:30 pm - 9:30 pm

The Stanford Symphony Orchestra welcomes its new conductor, Paul Phillips! The SSO opens its 2017-18 season with music from France and Russia, along with a work by the acclaimed Finnish composer Kaija Saariaho, a Helsinki native who has lived in Paris since 1982, bridging both musical worlds. Her “oceanic” tone poem, Ciel d’hiver (“Winter Sky”), beautifully complements Debussy’s La Mer. Berlioz’s Roman Carnival Overture and Tchaikovsky’s “Rococo” Variations, performed by Concerto Competition winner Danna Xue, round out the program. Program Hector…

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Talking about a Revolution: Gallery Talk Series

December 2 12:00 pm - 12:30 pm

The Brave New World of Soviet Political Posters This gallery talk with Bertrand Patenaude, research fellow, Hoover Institution Library & Archives, highlights how the new Soviet regime pioneered the political propaganda poster and examines recurring themes, symbols, and messages. MORE TALKS IN THIS SERIES: OCTOBER 19, 12PM, An Introduction to The Crown under the Hammer: Russia, Romanovs, Revolution with Jodi Roberts, Robert M. and Ruth L. Halperin Curator for Modern and Contemporary Art, Cantor Arts Center OCTOBER 21, 1PM, Russia’s Crown under Armand HAMMER!  with Edward Kasinec, visiting…

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Gallery Talk: Nina Katchadourian: Curiouser

December 2 2:00 pm - 2:30 pm

Please join Jennifer Carty, Associate Curator at Cantor Arts Center, for a Gallery Talk in Nina Katchadourian: Curiouser. Katchadourian: Curiouser explores several major bodies of work by celebrated Stanford-born, Brooklyn-based artist Nina Katchadourian (b. 1968), including video, photography, sculpture, and sound art. Katchadourian’s work reveals the creative potential, to use the artist’s words, that “lurks within the mundane”. Using ingenuity and humor, her practice encourages us to reinvigorate our own sense of curiosity and creativity, and to see our everyday…

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Gallery Talk: Nina Katchadourian: Curiouser

December 2 2:00 pm - 2:30 pm

Please join Jennifer Carty, Assistant Curator at Cantor Arts Center, for a Gallery Talk in Nina Katchadourian: Curiouser. Nina Katchadourian: Curiouser explores several major bodies of work by celebrated Stanford-born, Brooklyn-based artist Nina Katchadourian including video, photography, sculpture, and sound art. Katchadourian’s work reveals the creative potential, to use the artist’s words, that “lurks within the mundane.” Using ingenuity and humor, her practice encourages us to reinvigorate our own sense of curiosity and creativity, and to see our everyday surroundings as a…

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Play: The War Owl

December 2 6:30 pm - 8:00 pm

The War Owl looks at the evils of war as initially rendered in Iran’s grand epic poem, Shahnameh, and revisited by Bahar, the country’s twentieth century master lyricist. The play is written and directed by Reza Allamehzadeh, with the solo performance of Hamid Abdolmaleki and live musical accompaniment by Faramarz Aslani.  Part of the Stanford Festival of Iranian Arts

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Stanford Afro-Latin Jazz Ensemble: Fall Concert

December 2 7:30 pm - 9:30 pm

The Stanford Afro-Latin Jazz Ensemble, directed by Murray Low, presents its Spring concert. The ensemble, directed by Murray Low, is one of the finest academic performing groups of its kind and has been the recipient of several prestigious grants throughout its existence.

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The Haydn Project

December 2 7:30 pm - 9:00 pm

Take four musicians, ninety-three string quartets, and the genius of Franz Josef Haydn: Stir vigorously and applaud wildly. San Francisco Chamber Orchestra All-Stars Ben Simon, Robin Sharp, Julie Kim, and Hannah Addario-Berry are the Haydn Project, launched in September 2013 to boldly go where few quartets have gone before—a journey of exploration into the mostly brilliant, always inventive, enormously engaging ninety-plus string quartets of “Papa” Haydn. This special event will include a short presentation about Haydn by San Francisco Chamber…

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Stanford Symphony Orchestra

December 2 7:30 pm - 8:30 pm

The Stanford Symphony Orchestra welcomes its new conductor, Paul Phillips! The SSO opens its 2017-18 season with music from France and Russia, along with a work by the acclaimed Finnish composer Kaija Saariaho, a Helsinki native who has lived in Paris since 1982, bridging both musical worlds. Her “oceanic” tone poem, Ciel d’hiver (“Winter Sky”), beautifully complements Debussy’s La Mer. Berlioz’s Roman Carnival Overture and Tchaikovsky’s “Rococo” Variations, performed by Concerto Competition winner Danna Xue, round out the program. Program Hector…

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The Wise Women

December 2 7:30 pm - 9:00 pm

Conrad Susa’s The Wise Women (A Christmas Mystery Fable) explores the Nativity story through the perspective of Three Wise Women. Left behind while the Wise Men journey with the guidance of the Star of Bethlehem, the Wise Women instead experience a shared vision of the Holy Mother and Child. Susa’s one-act church opera premiered in 1994; the libretto is by Philip Littell. Students from the Department of Music, as well as faculty, staff, and community members, perform The Wise Women in the glorious…

Find out more »

Forgiving the Unforgivable? The Apology to Australia’s Indigenous Peoples and Implications for the Future of Indigenous Rights with Aaron Hahn Tapper

December 4 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Image credit: Barbara Ries © 2013 On February 13, 2008, as his first official act as Prime Minister, Kevin Rudd formally apologized to the country’s indigenous communities for their prolonged maltreatment. In particular, in “the Apology” Rudd brought attention to Australia’s infamous “Stolen Generations,” countless Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (ATSI) children kidnapped from their families by the government and placed with whites in an effort to “modernize” and “civilize” them. In asking indigenous Australians to forgive the unforgiveable, to begin healing the unhealable, Rudd also looked ahead, adding “The…

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How to Write Epic Fellowship Applications (Workshop #2)

December 4 5:30 pm - 6:30 pm

Join Hume Writing Center staff at the Haas Center for an evening of brainstorming and essay drafting. A great cure for writer’s block, this workshop will help you develop pages of ideas, a new set of writing tools, and the redefined focus and perspective you need to write a personal statement and essays for Post-Graduate Fellowship and Cardinal Quarter applications.

Find out more »

Talking about a Revolution: Gallery Talk Series

December 6 12:00 pm - 12:30 pm

Hidden in Plain Sight Learn behind the scenes stories of some of the objects on view in the exhibition with Marissa Schleicher Rhee, project archivist for exhibitions, Hoover Institution Library & Archives. MORE TALKS IN THIS SERIES: OCTOBER 19, 12PM, An Introduction to The Crown under the Hammer: Russia, Romanovs, Revolution with Jodi Roberts, Robert M. and Ruth L. Halperin Curator for Modern and Contemporary Art, Cantor Arts Center OCTOBER 21, 1PM, Russia’s Crown under Armand HAMMER!  with Edward Kasinec, visiting fellow, Hoover Institution Library & Archives  …

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NOON CONCERT: SLSQ Emerging String Quartet Program – Tesla Quartet

December 6 12:30 pm - 1:30 pm

Praised for their “superb capacity to find the inner heart of everything they play, regardless of era, style or technical demand” (The International Review of Music), the Tesla Quartet — named for the inventor and futurist Nikola Tesla — brings refinement and prowess to both new and established repertoire. The Tesla Quartet was recently announced as the winner of this year’s John Lad prize, presented annually by the St. Lawrence String Quartet to exceptional emerging chamber ensembles. “Though free to think and…

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DLCL Fall Film Series: Samsara (2011) Ron Fricke

December 6 6:30 pm - 9:00 pm

Ron Fricke’s visual spectacle Samsara harkens back to the tradition of silent nature films while incorporating the specific imagery and anxieties of the twenty-first century.  Filmed in 25 countries around the world over the course of five years, Samsara probes tensions between the sublimity of faith, modern technology, and natural wonders, and the mundanity and ferocity of everyday human experience that only film, with a variety of cutting-edge cinematographic techniques and technologies, can capture.

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“Westworld”

December 6 7:30 pm - 9:45 pm

Film Studies 119/319 “Synthetic Humans” presents portions of the critically acclaimed series Westworld as part of the Frankenstein@200 Film Festival.

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Early Music Singers: Music of the Reformation

December 6 7:30 pm - 9:00 pm

William Mahrt directs the Early Music Singers’ program, “Music of the Reformation,” which marks the 500th anniversary of the Reformation with music by Ludwig Senfl, Johann Walter, Hans Leo Hassler, Michael Praetorius, and Heinrich Schütz.

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Fall Chamber Music Showcase

December 6 7:30 pm - 9:00 pm

Ensembles from the Stanford Chamber Music program perform.

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A Bridge Taken for a Wall, a Wall Taken for a Bridge: On Persian Art, Poetry, and Translation

December 7 6:30 pm - 8:30 pm

Jahan Ramazani is University Professor and Edgar F. Shannon Professor of English at the University of Virginia. He is currently writing a book on poetry in a global age. This talk on poetry, art, and East-West translation ranges from ancient Iran to medieval Byzantium and the Abbasid era to modern Iran and Ireland. The lecture is in three parts. The first looks at the Persian artistic influences via Byzantium on a modern Irish poet that have passed largely unrecognized (a bridge…

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Open Studios: Fall | 2017

December 8 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Open Studios is a self-guided art tour of our undergraduate student showcase from the Fall 2017 Art Practice courses: Drawing, Painting, Printmaking, Digital Art, Sculpture, Film and more..! This is a rare opportunity to see student artwork in the studios in which it was created. Previous, Open Studio, photos can be viewed here VISITOR INFORMATION:The McMurtry Building is located on Stanford’s campus, at 355 Roth Way. The Stanford Art Gallery, room AG110 is located at the rear of the Art Gallery…

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A Festival of Lessons and Carols

December 8 7:30 pm - 9:00 pm

All are welcome to this Service of Advent and Christmas readings and music, based on the famous Lessons and Carols Service held annually at King’s College, Cambridge. Festive music will be sung by the Memorial Church Choir and the Stanford Chamber Chorale.

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The Red Violin

December 8 7:30 pm - 9:30 pm

Canadian violinist Lara St. John, with the help of members of the Stanford Philharmonia, performs the score at a screening of The Red Violin, an engaging film about an antique instrument made in Cremona, Italy. The story follows this violin’s odyssey from Europe to modern Montreal, tracing its path through four centuries and five countries and bringing ill fortune to all who play it. Can the curse be broken? This film is rated R

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Gallery Talk: Rodin: Shock of the Modern Body

December 9 2:00 pm - 2:30 pm

Melissa A. Yuen, Curatorial Fellow for American and European Art to 1900, discusses Rodin’s working process in Rodin: Shock of the Modern Body. At the time of his death, Auguste Rodin (France, 1840-1917) was counted among the most renowned artists in the world. A century later, after numerous reassessments by generations of art historians, Rodin continues to be recognized for making figurative sculpture modern by redefining the expressive capacity of the human form. This installation spans three galleries and features nearly…

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Friends of Music Holiday Musicale – NEW TIME!

December 9 2:30 pm - 4:00 pm

Please join us for an afternoon of music to bring you holiday spirit and cheer, featuring the Stanford Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Paul Phillips, and the Stanford Chamber Chorale, directed by Stephen Sano, along with student and faculty guests. Note: This event will begin at 2:30, not 12:30, as announced earlier.

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A Festival of Lessons and Carols

December 9 7:30 pm - 9:00 pm

All are welcome to this Service of Advent and Christmas readings and music, based on the famous Lessons and Carols Service held annually at King’s College, Cambridge. Festive music will be sung by the Memorial Church Choir and the Stanford Chamber Chorale.

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Second Sunday: Family Day

December 10 11:00 am - 4:00 pm

SECOND SUNDAY is a free, family-focused day of art talks, hands-on art making, and gallery adventures for visitors of all ages. Registration is not required and families can tailor their museum experience based on their schedule and the activities that interest them most. CANTOR & ANDERSON Drop-in Studio: Experiment with art materials and new techniques by participating in a hands-on art making experience. All visitors, regardless of age, ability, or familiarity with the creative process, are encouraged to participate. Art Packs: Check out an…

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Stanford Baroque Soloists: Italy Before Corelli – NEW DATE!

December 11 7:30 pm - 9:00 pm

Anthony Martin directs the Stanford Baroque Soloists’ program, “Italy Before Corelli,” featuring string music mostly from Venice in the 17th century composed by Castello, Marini, Gabrieli, Rossi, Monteverdi, Farina, and Corelli. Note: This event has been rescheduled from the previously announced date of Dec. 9.

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Annual Messiah Sing / Play Along – NEW DATE!

December 15 7:30 pm - 9:00 pm

This annual “sing and play it yourself” celebration of Handel’s masterwork, conducted by Stephen M. Sano, is a favorite of campus and community! Orchestral parts will be provided, and singers may purchase scores at the door or bring their own.

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Holiday Organ Recital: Robert Huw Morgan

December 17 1:30 pm - 2:30 pm

Dr. Robert Huw Morgan, university organist, presents his annual holiday recital. 

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January 2018

Talking about a Revolution: Gallery Talk Series

January 13, 2018 12:30 pm - 1:00 pm

Russia’s Crown Reprised   Lascelle Meserve and Nicolas de Basily collected and cherished old Russia and its art. This gallery talk with Edward Kasinec, visiting fellow, Hoover Institution Library & Archives, highlights their gifts to the Hoover Institution Library & Archives that make up part of the institution’s impressive holdings on the Russian Revolution and Imperial Russia. MORE TALKS IN THIS SERIES: OCTOBER 19, 12PM, An Introduction to The Crown under the Hammer: Russia, Romanovs, Revolution with Jodi Roberts, Robert M. and Ruth L. Halperin Curator for Modern…

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Gallery Talk: Rodin: Shock of the Modern Body

January 18, 2018 12:00 pm - 12:30 pm

The MonumentsPlease join Melissa A. Yuen, Curatorial Fellow for American and European Art to 1900, for a discussion about The Burghers of Calais and Monument to Balzac in Rodin: Shock of the Modern Body. At the time of his death, Auguste Rodin (France, 1840-1917) was counted among the most renowned artists in the world. A century later, after numerous reassessments by generations of art historians, Rodin continues to be recognized for making figurative sculpture modern by redefining the expressive capacity of the…

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Claire Messud Reading, part of the Lane Lecture Series

January 22, 2018 8:00 pm - 9:00 pm

Claire Messud is a recipient of Guggenheim and Radcliffe Fellowships and the Strauss Living Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Author of six previous works of fiction including her most recent novel, The Burning Girl, she lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts, with her family.

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Heterogeneous Critique; A Proposal from a Latin American(ist) Point of View

January 26, 2018 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Speaker: Dr. Friedhelm Schmidt-Welle By introducing the concept of “heterogeneous critique”, I propose a theoretical and methodological framework and an alternative to universalist approaches in literary and cultural criticism, approaches which even include the trend to apply Anglo-Saxon postcolonialist positions on Latin American cultures. I will analyze the decline of universalist theory exemplified by the crisis of literary history and the emergence of a new regionalism in Latin American cultural critique which tries to overcome the invisibility of local theoretical…

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February 2018

Third Annual Stanford Engaged Scholarship Conference: (Re)Thinking Engaged Scholarship and Participatory Citizenship

February 1, 2018 10:00 am - 3:00 pm

The Stanford Engaged Scholarship Conference highlights engaged scholarship and scholar-activism in institutions of higher education and in the community. We define engaged scholarship as diverse research, pedagogy, and creative performance—conducted in partnership with public, non-profit, or private stakeholders—focused on addressing critical social issues and contributing to the public good. This year’s conference theme focuses on the relationships between engaged scholarship and participatory citizenship, while highlighting interdisciplinary and intersectional approaches. Panel presentations will speak to questions and topics of inquiry in several…

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The Matter of Photography in the Americas

February 7, 2018 11:00 am - 5:00 pm

Featuring artists from twelve different countries, this exhibition presents a wide range of creative responses to photography as an artistic medium and a communicative tool uniquely suited to modern media landscapes and globalized economies. The artists in this exhibition resist the impulse to “document” or “photograph anew” the world immediately around them. Instead, they employ a wide range of materials — from prints and drawings to photocopies and audio installations — to highlight the ways in which photography shapes our…

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Phillip E. Bloom: “Born in the Latter Days of the Dharma: Ecology and Eternity in a Song-Dynasty Buddhist Monastery”

February 8, 2018 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

Abstract: What are the spatial and temporal environments of a Chinese Buddhist monastery? What place does nature hold therein? To answer these questions, this talk will examine Shizhuanshan (Dazu County, Chongqing Municipality), a hilltop sanctuary in southwestern China constructed by a wealthy layman in the late eleventh century. It will argue that at Shizhuanshan, architecture, image, and text work together to transform the natural environment itself into a site for the eternal performance of Buddhist ritual. Bio: Phillip E. Bloom…

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Darlene Love

February 9, 2018 7:30 pm - 9:00 pm

For more than 50 years, singer Darlene Love has been making rock and roll’s world go ‘round. In the early 1960s, she was part of Phil Spector’s Wall of Sound for “He’s a Rebel,” doing backing (as well as uncredited lead) vocals for “Da Doo Ron Ron,” “Be My Baby,” and scores of other hits. With the 2013 documentary Twenty Feet from Stardom, she became the best-known unknown in rock history. Joined for part of the program by the Stanford Symphony…

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Talking about a Revolution: Gallery Talk Series

February 14, 2018 12:00 pm - 12:30 pm

Love & Revolution This Valentine’s Day gallery talk with Samira Bozorgi, assistant archivist for exhibitions, Hoover Institution Library & Archives, focuses on some of the couples who appear in the exhibition including Catherine the Great and Peter III, Nicolas and Lascelle de Basily, and Soviet avant-garde artist couple Valentina Kulagina and Gustav Klutsis. MORE TALKS IN THIS SERIES: OCTOBER 19, 12PM, An Introduction to The Crown under the Hammer: Russia, Romanovs, Revolution with Jodi Roberts, Robert M. and Ruth L. Halperin Curator for Modern and Contemporary…

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Gallery Talk: Rodin: Shock of the Modern Body

February 14, 2018 2:00 pm - 2:30 pm

The MonumentsPlease join Melissa A. Yuen, Curatorial Fellow for American and European Art to 1900, for a discussion about The Gates of Hell in Rodin: Shock of the Modern Body. At the time of his death, Auguste Rodin (France, 1840-1917) was counted among the most renowned artists in the world. A century later, after numerous reassessments by generations of art historians, Rodin continues to be recognized for making figurative sculpture modern by redefining the expressive capacity of the human form. This installation…

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Pioneers in Educational Globe-trotting: Stanford Travel/Study at 50

February 20, 2018 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm

Speaker: Brett S. Thompson, Director, Stanford Travel/Study Program

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Heather Blair: “What Counts? Buddhism, Picturebooks, and Japanese Culture”

February 22, 2018 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

Abstract: Jokes about hell, fake sutras that, though specious, exert miraculous effects, and stories about a bodhisattva who is as well loved for his failures as for his assistance. These and other playful engagements with Buddhist ideas and imagery pervade picturebooks from Japan’s secular mainstream. But do they count as Buddhist? Focusing on picturebooks published for children from the 1960s to the present, this talk asks what it might mean to be culturally—without necessarily being confessionally—Buddhist. It presents an argument…

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Talking about a Revolution: Gallery Talk Series

February 24, 2018 2:00 pm - 2:30 pm

The Brave New World of Soviet Political Posters  This gallery talk, with Bertrand Patenaude, research fellow, Hoover Institution Library & Archives, highlights how the new Soviet regime pioneered the political propaganda poster and examines recurring themes, symbols, and messages.  MORE TALKS IN THIS SERIES: OCTOBER 19, 12PM, An Introduction to The Crown under the Hammer: Russia, Romanovs, Revolution with Jodi Roberts, Robert M. and Ruth L. Halperin Curator for Modern and Contemporary Art, Cantor Arts Center OCTOBER 21, 1PM, Russia’s Crown under Armand HAMMER!  with Edward…

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March 2018

Barbara Rossetti Ambros: “On Talking Terms with Mihotokesama: Material and Bodily Practices of a Jōdo Shin Healer”

March 1, 2018 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

Abstract:  The life story of Takumi Toyoko (b. 1929) illustrates the material and corporeal practices of popular Jōdo Shin in the Hokuriku region. At the intersection between a secret Jōdo Shin confraternity and a healer with an open clientele, Takumi and her devotees challenge stereotypical notions of Jōdo Shin as being opposed to magic and folk traditions. Rather than emphasizing scriptural authority, Takumi communicates directly with the Buddha Amida and wields her own body as a vehicle of salvation. Yet Amida…

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Talking about a Revolution: Gallery Talk Series

March 3, 2018 12:00 pm - 12:30 pm

Hidden in Plain Sight Learn behind the scenes stories of some of the objects on view in the exhibition with Marissa Schleicher Rhee, project archivist for exhibitions, Hoover Institution Library & Archives. MORE TALKS IN THIS SERIES: OCTOBER 19, 12PM, An Introduction to The Crown under the Hammer: Russia, Romanovs, Revolution with Jodi Roberts, Robert M. and Ruth L. Halperin Curator for Modern and Contemporary Art, Cantor Arts Center OCTOBER 21, 1PM, Russia’s Crown under Armand HAMMER!  with Edward Kasinec, visiting fellow, Hoover Institution Library & Archives  …

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Rev. Shojun Ogi: “Re-Focusing Buddhism in Modern Japanese Society: New Dimensions in Contemporary Japanese Buddhism”

March 8, 2018 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

Abstract: Historically, especially after World War II, Japanese Buddhist temples became focused mainly on conducting funeral rituals, various commemorative memorials, the selling of talismans, and conducting prayer rituals in the name of good fortune, happiness and safety. This led Japanese society, including both Buddhist priests and public at large to come to believe that Buddhism was only relevant regarding death or wishes. However, recognizing the declining position of Buddhism in contemporary Japan, some Buddhist priests have begun creating and implementing…

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A Conversation with Aimee Bender

March 12, 2018 7:00 pm - 8:30 pm

Aimee Bender is the author of five books: The Girl in the Flammable Skirt (1998) which was a NY Times Notable Book, An Invisible Sign of My Own (2000) which was an L.A. Times pick of the year, Willful Creatures(2005) which was nominated by The Believer as one of the best books of the year, The Particular Sadness of Lemon Cake (2010) which won the SCIBA award for best fiction, and an Alex Award, and The Color Master, a NY Times Notable book for 2013. Her books have been translated…

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April 2018

Health Humanities Consortium Conference

April 20, 2018 12:00 am

A three-day celebration of the 200th anniversary of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein through an exploration of medically-based ethical dilemmas and an examination of the relevance of Frankenstein in moral imagination today.

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James A. Benn: “Controversies in the Doctrine and Practice of Self-immolation in Medieval China”

April 21, 2018 12:00 am

Abstract: In this seminar we will read selected passages from the chapter on self-immolation (sheshen pian 捨身篇) in the seventh-century Chinese Buddhist compendium Fayuan zhulin 法苑珠林. We will see how the compiler of the work—Daoshi 道世 (596?–683) places a range of somatic practices including burning the body within the context of the propagation of Buddhism. We will note how he deploys key jātaka tales and Mahāyāna sutras as scriptural supports for the practice, and reflect on his choice of hagiographical material from China. Bio: James A. Benn…

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Hisham Matar Reading, part of the Lane Lecture Series

April 23, 2018 8:00 pm - 9:00 pm

Photo by Diana Matar Part of the Lane Lecture Series Hisham Matar was born in New York City to Libyan parents, spent his childhood in Tripoli and Cairo, and has lived most of his adult life in London. His critically acclaimed 2016 memoir The Return: Fathers, Sons and the Land in Between won the Pulitzer Prize for Autobiography and received the PEN America Book of the Year Award. In The Return, he recounts his search for his father, who was…

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Sundays with the St. Lawrence

April 29, 2018 2:30 pm - 4:00 pm

Returning to its roots, the St. Lawrence performs music by Canadian composer R. Murray Schafer, in addition to Haydn’s String Quartet in C Major, op. 33, no. 3, and Erich Wolfgang Korngold’s Opus 15 Piano Quintet with longtime collaborator Stephen Prutsman.

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May 2018

Tim H. Barrett: “A Possible Buddhist Influence on Chinese Political Thought”

May 3, 2018 6:00 pm - 7:30 pm

Abstract: Much work has been done in recent decades on the way in which Chinese rulers made use of Buddhism to bolster their power, but in fact some Buddhist ideas concerning kingship found in South Asian materials were quite negative. China was in imperial times an autocracy in which such negativity towards kingship generally did not flourish. But if we look carefully, is there really no trace at all of these Buddhist ideas entering the Chinese tradition of political thought? …

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47th Annual Stanford Powwow and Art Market

May 11, 2018 5:00 pm - 10:00 pm

A celebration of Native American cultures including dance and music with more than 100 artist, food and information booth vendors. Booth vendors will begin opening by 5:00pm and Intertribal and competition dancing continues 7:00pm-11:00pm on Friday, Noon-10:00pm on Saturday, and Noon-6:00pm on Sunday. The 22nd Annual Stanford Powwow Fun Run/Walk will take place at 8:00am on Saturday, May 12.  These outdoor events will continue “rain or shine!”

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47th Annual Stanford Powwow and Art Market

May 12, 2018 10:00 am - 10:00 pm

A celebration of Native American cultures including dance and music with more than 100 artist, food and information booth vendors. Booth vendors will begin opening mid-morning and Intertribal and competition dancing continues 7:00pm-11:00pm on Friday, Noon-10:00pm on Saturday, and Noon-6:00pm on Sunday. The 22nd Annual Stanford Powwow Fun Run/Walk will take place at 8:00am on Saturday, May 12.  These outdoor events will continue “rain or shine!”

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47th Annual Stanford Powwow and Art Market

May 13, 2018 10:00 am - 6:00 pm

A celebration of Native American cultures including dance and music with more than 100 artist, food and information booth vendors. Booth vendors will begin opening by mid-morning and Intertribal and competition dancing continues 7:00pm-10:00pm on Friday, Noon-10:00pm on Saturday, and Noon-6:00pm on Sunday. The 22nd Annual Stanford Powwow Fun Run/Walk will take place at 8:00am on Saturday, May 12.  These outdoor events will continue “rain or shine!”

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Rupert Gethin: “On Death and Rebirth, and What Happens in Between: Two Buddhist Accounts of Why it Matters”

May 17, 2018 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

Abstract: Ancient Indian Buddhist thinkers for the most part took it as given that death was followed by rebirth, but they disagreed on whether death was followed immediately by rebirth or by an in between state (antarābhava). The lecture will consider two accounts of death and rebirth, both from the fourth to fifth centuries CE but representing the traditions of two different schools: (1) the account found in Vasubandhu’s Abhidharmakośa, which presents the traditions of the Sarvāstivāda school and advocates an in between state, and (2) the account found in the…

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Oliver Freiberger: “Lines in Water? On Drawing Buddhism’s Boundaries in Ancient India”

May 24, 2018 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

Abstract: This talk explores the ways in which religious agents – and modern scholars – distinguish religions. Illustrated by examples from ancient India, it will problematize the popular notion of blurred boundaries and suggest a multilayered approach for analyzing religious boundary-making. The paper argues that scholars should be prepared to find, even within one religious community, numerous and possibly conflicting ways of drawing a boundary between “us” and “them.” Bio: Dr. Oliver Freiberger is associate professor of Asian Studies and…

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