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Looking at Richard Diebenkorn at the Cantor

The Stanford exhibition celebrates a great American painter and alumnus.

American painter Richard Diebenkorn’s connection to Stanford is deep as well as broad. Not only was Diebenkorn an alum, but even after his death in 1993, his impact has continued on campus thanks to the number of significant artworks given and lent to Stanford, the digitization of his sketchbooks and the documented examination via infrared…

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artsCatalyst Grants 2018-19

This past academic year, the Office of the Vice President for the Arts awarded 27 artsCatalyst Grants to faculty members from across the University. These grants foster arts experiences that enhance classroom experiences for undergraduate students. Activities included field trips to Bay Area cultural organizations, workshops with visiting artists, and attending performances. 2018-19 artsCatalyst Grant Recipients Interpreting Art (ITALIC 92), Karla…

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Measurements: Similar, accurate, truthful

May 20 also marks the debut of a new book on the history of measurement by Emanuele Lugli, assistant professor of art and art history at the School of Humanities and Sciences. The Making of Measure and the Promise of Sameness (University of Chicago Press) is a quest for the foundations of objectivity through an analysis of the…

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Cantor Arts Center receives collection of over 1,000 photographs by American artists

Gift from the Capital Group Foundation includes funding for curatorial fellow position to oversee vast collection of works by Ansel Adams, Gordon Parks, Edward Weston and others.

The Cantor Arts Center at Stanford University has received a gift of more than 1,000 photographs, including works by American photographers Ansel Adams, Edward Curtis, John Gutmann, Helen Levitt, Wright Morris, Gordon Parks and Edward Weston. The gift from the Capital Group Foundation includes $2 million to endow a named curatorial fellow position and support…

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New Stanford exhibit showcases propaganda posters made during China’s Cultural Revolution

About 50 posters, on view at the East Asia Library through April 24, show propaganda messages and artwork produced during Mao Zedong’s rule in China.

A new Stanford exhibition displays propaganda posters from Mao Zedong’s rule in China, offering a window into the country’s chaotic and bloody Cultural Revolution of 1966-1976. This 1951 poster is titled “Celebrate the 30th Anniversary of the Birth of the Chinese Communist Party.” (Image credit: Courtesy East Asia Library, Stanford University) The exhibit, Modern Chinese Political Posters, is…

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New Stanford Libraries exhibition highlights rare artifacts important to Stanford research

Scholars Select highlights rare books and artifacts held in Green Library collections that are valuable to the research of scholars at Stanford. Faculty members share their cherished item.

A 17th-century volume of William Shakespeare’s plays, a piano roll recorded by Claude Debussy and a 1959 edition of the Green Book, a travel guide for African Americans driving through the Jim Crow-era South, are among dozens of unique artifacts now on display at Stanford’s Green Library Bing Wing as part of a new exhibition. Scholars…

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Stanford English students, researchers help unearth new insights about Virginia Woolf’s press, other early 20th-century authors

Over the past six years, several Stanford researchers and English students have been helping develop a digital archive of early 20th-century publishers.

Using the latest tools in digitization and data analysis, a group of Stanford English students is helping scholars uncover new insights about British writer Virginia Woolf and the history of literary movements in the early 20th century. Until now, no one has studied in detail Woolf’s impact on the publishing industry of that era and…

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Cantor Arts Center and Stanford Libraries collaborate to make Warhol photography archives publicly available

Searchable databases allow researchers and Andy Warhol fans worldwide to examine over 130,000 photographs taken by the iconic artist.

For those who ever wondered about the exact design of John Lennon’s iconic glasses or what it would have been like to have had a front-row seat at Maria Shriver’s wedding to Arnold Schwarzenegger, the newly accessible archive of Andy Warhol’s photography provides a rare opportunity to get up close and personal with the social…

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Unparalleled collection of Warhol’s photography at Stanford University includes images never exhibited before

In an interactive element of the photo exhibit at the Cantor Arts Center, visitors can zoom in on the artist’s contact sheets and create their own Warhol-inspired digital prints on screen.

Photographs by Andy Warhol that have never publicly been displayed are the heart of the new exhibition, Contact Warhol: Photography Without End, on view Sept. 29, 2018, through Jan. 6, 2019, at the Cantor Arts Center at Stanford University. The show traces Warhol’s artistic process from the most fundamental level of a photo negative to its transformation…

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Silicon Valley tech culture has roots in Burning Man, Stanford scholar says

Communication Professor Fred Turner has been studying the role of art and countercultural movements – including the communal, participatory lifestyle celebrated at the annual Burning Man festival – that have had far-reaching influence in the workplace of tech firms.

Every August, fire-breathing dancers, costumed performers and free-thinking artists gather in the Nevada desert to celebrate Burning Man, a countercultural event devoted to communal living, radical art and self-expression. Amid the huge crowds attending the Burning Man festival in Nevada’s Black Rock Desert are thousands of people taking a break from their Silicon Valley jobs. (Image…

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New exhibition at the Hoover Institution resurfaces a forgotten tabloid from the Vietnam War

A new exhibition at the Hoover Institution highlights Overseas Weekly, a civilian-run, women-led newspaper for American GIs abroad that defied top military brass and defended freedom of the press during the Korean and Vietnam wars.

For the past 40 years, a Stanford alumna’s journalistic legacy from the Korean and Vietnam wars has sat forgotten in musty boxes in a basement in Sweden. Overseeing Overseas Weekly’s Pacific edition was Ann Bryan, the only female editor in chief in Saigon. She successfully sued the Department of Defense to lift a ban that prohibited…

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