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Students minoring in art practice produce a major work of art at the new Stanford Hospital

Two Stanford undergraduates helped paint a mural based on the drawings of the artist Sol LeWitt. The process provided the students with insight into how the visual environment can influence health.

Students Noah DeWald and Savannah Mohacsi were not exactly sure what their summer internship at Stanford Health Care would entail. Apprenticing with master painters to bring to life a conceptual work of art by an iconic 20th-century American artist that will be seen by thousands was beyond their imagination, as was the profound realization that…

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Stanford Live presents a genre-bending musical performance exploring beauty and aesthetics in Robert Mapplethorpe’s photography

"Triptych (Eyes of One on Another)" Oct. 3, 2019, in Memorial Auditorium

Marking 30 years since the death of groundbreaking photographer Robert Mapplethorpe, Triptych (Eyes of One on Another) explores the origins and impact of Mapplethorpe’s controversial photography. This staged musical work produced by ArKtype / Thomas O. Kriegsmann combines orchestra, vocal ensembles, theater, poetry, and photography to re-examine notions of obscenity, race, and aesthetics that Mapplethorpe himself challenged…

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artsCatalyst Grants 2018-19

This past academic year, the Office of the Vice President for the Arts awarded 27 artsCatalyst Grants to faculty members from across the University. These grants foster arts experiences that enhance classroom experiences for undergraduate students. Activities included field trips to Bay Area cultural organizations, workshops with visiting artists, and attending performances. 2018-19 artsCatalyst Grant Recipients Interpreting Art (ITALIC 92), Karla…

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Perspectives on “Hamilton”

Last year Allyson Hobbs taught a one-unit interdisciplinary undergraduate course “Hamilton: An American Musical” that explored why Alexander Hamilton and the contemporary musical based on his life resonate so profoundly with the American public.

Hamilton is one the most popular and most celebrated musicals in American history. It has essentially redefined the American musical by drawing on the language and rhythms of hip-hop and R & B, genres that are underrepresented in the musical theater tradition. Last year Allyson Hobbs, associate professor of history in the School of the…

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The first two VAF artists are Turkish ud player and composer Necati Çelik and Indian photographer Gauri Gill

New Visiting Artist Fund in Honor of Roberta Bowman Denning (VAF) brings international artists into Stanford classrooms across campus.

The Office of the Vice President for the Arts at Stanford University announces the first two artists in the new Visiting Artist Fund in Honor of Roberta Bowman Denning (VAF). The program brings international artists into Stanford classrooms in order to provide a stimulus in artistic thinking and aesthetic perspectives to disciplines across the university.…

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Science meets art at Stanford

Science and art are often regarded as distinct – either a person can’t be serious about both or an interest in one must relate somehow to work in the other. In reality, many scientists participate in and produce art at all levels and in every medium. Here are just a few of these people –…

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Stanford polymath blazes a new trail with his design manifesto

Written as a photo comic book, Ge Wang’s publication charts new ethical and aesthetic territory.

Stanford scholar Ge Wang has chosen an unconventional medium for a manifesto about why technology and design needs to reflect human values: a comic book. “It’s nerdy. It’s philosophical. It’s a core dump of my brain in comic form,” said Wang, an associate professor of music in the School of Humanities and Science, who has…

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Literature professor collaborates with students and artist on poetry project

Amir Eshel teaches that art is a way to react to life’s most challenging circumstances.

When poet and Stanford Professor Amir Eshel saw a series of drawings in the studio of German artist Gerhard Richter, he had an experience many would describe as spiritual. Eshel was in Cologne, Germany to interview Richter for his forthcoming book Poetic Thinking Today (Stanford University Press, 2019). He wanted to learn more about the artist’s four-part…

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Stanford course teaches students the science of art materials

Science informs art and vice versa in this class that aims to encourage students to look at art – and materials found elsewhere – with fresh eyes.

If you walked the first floor of the Shriram Center for Bioengineering and Chemical Engineering at Stanford University in early September, you may have peered in on a lab full of students, decked out in lab coats, gloves, face masks and goggles. This would be no unusual sight in a chemistry lab, save for what the students…

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Sculpture installed at Stanford University’s Denning House anchors new art collection

The 17-foot bronze sculpture is by Ursula von Rydingsvard, who will visit campus next month for a formal dedication of the artwork and to speak with students.

When the inaugural cohort of Knight-Hennessy Scholars arrive to Stanford, they will be greeted by a new sculpture in front of Denning House, their program’s new home. The sculpture, MOCNA, by Ursula von Rydingsvard, was commissioned as the first piece in Denning House’s art collection, which plans to acquire one piece every year from emerging and established…

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New exhibition at the Hoover Institution resurfaces a forgotten tabloid from the Vietnam War

A new exhibition at the Hoover Institution highlights Overseas Weekly, a civilian-run, women-led newspaper for American GIs abroad that defied top military brass and defended freedom of the press during the Korean and Vietnam wars.

For the past 40 years, a Stanford alumna’s journalistic legacy from the Korean and Vietnam wars has sat forgotten in musty boxes in a basement in Sweden. Overseeing Overseas Weekly’s Pacific edition was Ann Bryan, the only female editor in chief in Saigon. She successfully sued the Department of Defense to lift a ban that prohibited…

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Science students make art to reflect on their time at Stanford

Projects in The Senior Reflection mix science with art. They have included documentaries, sculptures and performances and expressed students’ views on nature, health and personal experiences.

Nibbling on petite samplings of quail, students in The Senior Reflection excitedly consider the acorn porridge and debate about the level of detail the chef – their classmate Alex Nguyen-Phuc, ’18 – should include in a printed menu to accompany the final meal. Although the class has taken on a temporary air of fine dining, it is…

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Nebulate: an installation by students of Stanford’s Architectural Design Program

Installed in front of the Anderson Collection, Nebulate‘s structure is comprised of plastic bubbles of varying sizes, assembled to form a translucent, cloud-like mass. Architectural Design Program students explored how surface deformation, through dimpling and curvature, increased the strength of the panel. The final form embodies a viral mass upon its environment as it ebbs and…

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Stanford senior and university VR club co-founder creates pioneering augmented reality film with fellow undergraduate

Max Korman believes that new augmented reality platforms represent a paradigm shift in how people will tell stories and create art in the future.

Stanford undergraduates Max Korman, ’18, and Khoi Le, ’20, launched what may be the world’s first augmented reality narrative film. And they did it using their mobile phones. Snowbird is a 3D-animated short movie about porcelain creatures that come to life in a snow globe. (Image credit: Courtesy of Max Korman) Augmented reality (AR) is a…

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Stanford student’s investigation reveals images in Diebenkorn painting

Richard Diebenkorn's 'Window' is the centerpiece of a new interactive exhibition at the Cantor Arts Center. The exhibit reveals hidden images beneath the painting found by Stanford student Katherine Van Kirk.

Stanford student Katherine Van Kirk, ’19, has paired modern technology with old-fashioned detective work to reveal images hidden beneath the surface of artist Richard Diebenkorn’s painting Window (1967). Van Kirk discovered multiple compositions hidden below Window’s surface that date to the mid-1950s and ‘60s, when Diebenkorn was a leader of the Bay Area Figurative movement. These earlier compositions…

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